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dlcharles
04-14-2006, 09:03 PM
The following post is meant ONLY as a self-denigrating humour attempt caused by my own ineptitude. Sheesh, Veinglory scared me so bad I have suddenly become politically correct conscious (humour here).



I had an urge to try my hand at writing romance novels so I talked my wife into borrowing a bunch of books from one of her girlfriends. I read every one of those books in order to catch a glimpse as to what constitutes "romance" - and I must admit I don't think I can write in this genre. I read at least twenty different author's books and they all read the same.

Are women out of their minds when they write this stuff? I studied phrases like: "His swollen manhood pressed against her" _ now just what is a man's hood and how did it get swollen. I am a sixty-two year old male and never have I discovered any semblance of a hood anywhere on my body, and if I did have a hood I sure wouldn't want to cause it to get swollen.

"His thumb pressed against the center of her universe, causing waves of ecstasy to course through her breast." - Now this is a good one! Center of her universe - what is that? And using his thumb? Either I am more naive than even I thought or the female body has things going on I never heard of.

"He held her in his strong masculine arms, his muscles rippling with the desire to kiss her." - This one is really a no-brainer, since it is obviously a male holding a female even I can figure out that "his" means male - so logically I would presume "masculine" would be a given. Now I have managed to kiss a few ladies in my time, but I can never recall a single instance when my masculine muscular strong arms rippled with desire to kiss someone. I can remember when my lips seemed to have a life of their own as they came into contact with her lips - but they certainly did not ripple.

I won't even attempt to list the various sentence structures used to describe the sexual act itelf, but almost every single one of them made me chuckle with amusement. What is it with the feminine mind which can turn a most enjoyable interlude into a cataclysmic sensual orgasm simply because some unshaved ruffian smiles at her and she thinks she can win his heart by holding back? I don't know, but I believe romance novels are way beyond my ability. Do women actually believe this stuff? If I attempted to "romance" my wife the way men do in these stories she would throw me out in a second.

Many, many years ago I was hitch hiking across the country and landed a job near Franklin, Kentucky at a truck stop. At this truck stop there were at least six "waitresses" at all times on duty. This puzzled me for a few days until I learned they were waitresses only when they were not busy in one of the bedrooms with customers. I was young back then and felt I had arrived in a young man's concept of true heaven. As I worked around the place cleaning, washing dishes, mopping, short order cooking, pumping gas into the big rigs, I was allowed to partake of the various pleasures the ladies offered - and at no charge. I even was allowed to give massages, do their hair, etc., learning all kinds of fantastic things during my tenure at that truck stop. Not once, I mean not even once, did any of those ladies ever act like women do in romance novels - never. I would have stayed there forever if some redneck bubba sheriff hadn't raided the place, at which time I moved on.

DamaNegra
04-14-2006, 09:27 PM
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/Emoterofl5.gif

veinglory
04-14-2006, 09:40 PM
Imagine picking a dozen books at random from any genre. What are the odds you would get the best, and the ones best for you as a reader? If, indeed, this is the genre for you at all.

What baffles me more than the fact some romance publisher put out the purple stuff (many do not) is why you felt any inclination to write romance at all or come to the romance forum to share your disdain for the genre. If you want frank explicit sex try Ellora's Cave ot Loose Id--if you want it without romance try pornography?

If you would like to read some good romance by all means tell us what you are looking for and get some recommendation but mocking quotes doesn't seem to me to meet the forums single rule: "respect your fellow writer."

Now if you define all or most women by truck stop sex workers and expect fictional genre characters to be realistic--well, actually, never mind... I'll leave it at that.

Medievalist
04-14-2006, 09:43 PM
You're not reading the "good" stuff.

Look for books by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller--I'm fond of Pilots Choice in particular, or Plan B, but they're super. They're SF/Romance cross overs. Or look for Georgette Heyer, or Laura London/Sharn and Tom Curtis The Windflower.

There are thousands of "Romance" novels published in a year, with enormous variety of subject, style and approach. Go to your library and look there. Get people who aren't suffering from insomnia to suggest authors and titles; I'm close to aphasic today.

dlcharles
04-14-2006, 10:01 PM
Veinglory: Disdain? Never even gave it thought in that manner. The post was meant "tongue-in-cheek" at my own expense - and not as a derogatory. I do not have the ability to write in this genre - no matter the wish to do so. I would never "disrepect" another 'writer', but regardless of the author or the genre, when one can find humor in something it becomes worth writing about.

veinglory
04-14-2006, 10:05 PM
Veinglory: Disdain? Never even gave it thought in that manner. The post was meant "tongue-in-cheek" at my own expense - and not as a derogatory. I do not have the ability to write in this genre - no matter the wish to do so. I would never "disrepect" another 'writer', but regardless of the author or the genre, when one can find humor in something it becomes worth writing about.

"Are women out of their minds when they write this stuff?"

Keep in mind that on the internet irony and /or humor does not always come across.

dlcharles
04-14-2006, 10:09 PM
Very true - and point taken. I hereby give myself several bad rep points - but I still find humour in the numerous stories I read. I will immediately go back, edit, and clarify as I still do not know how to delete a thread. Which brings up an interesting question - why do most males NOT like romance novels. An answer would be most appreciated.

Medievalist
04-14-2006, 10:30 PM
Spend some time at this site; it's fabulous, and huge:
All About Romance (http://www.likesbooks.com/).

Notice the reviews, and the message forums, and especially the exquisite Purple Prose Parody (http://www.likesbooks.com/ppppageindex.html).

Also, there's a wonderful and pointed blog on romances called Smart Bitches, Trashy Books (http://www.smartbitchestrashybooks.com/).

dlcharles
04-14-2006, 10:33 PM
Spend some time at this site; it's fabulous, and huge:
All About Romance (http://www.likesbooks.com/).

Notice the reviews, and the message forums, and especially the exquisite Purple Prose Parody (http://www.likesbooks.com/ppppageindex.html).

Also, there's a wonderful and pointed blog on romances called Smart Bitches, Trashy Books (http://www.smartbitchestrashybooks.com/).

Thank you! And just for the record - I am now determined to find out if I am able to write a true "romance" novel. I shall study everything and then take pen in hand - and we shall see. I'll keep you informed. My post has already resulted in rewards - thanks again to all.

dlcharles
04-14-2006, 10:34 PM
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/Emoterofl5.gif

I offer sincere blessings to you for realizing I was making a ha ha.

Cathy C
04-15-2006, 12:01 AM
Jeez, guys! I go away for a couple of hours and all heck breaks loose! ;)


Glad to see that this was written tongue-in-cheek rather than seriously, dlcharles. Some people would take it the wrong way--in far worse ways than the comments already here. Good luck with your novel! :)

dlcharles
04-15-2006, 12:20 AM
Jeez, guys! I go away for a couple of hours and all heck breaks loose! ;)


Glad to see that this was written tongue-in-cheek rather than seriously, dlcharles. Some people would take it the wrong way--in far worse ways than the comments already here. Good luck with your novel! :)

Thanks, Cathy. I now have two whom I am afraid of - Quidscriblis and Veinglory. Not too bad considering the thousands of writers online in AW. I believe there is a gigantic difference in poking fun at a genre and disrespecting a writer - I have lots of writers whom I respect and enjoy, but sometimes the genre itself can be hilarious.. I once began a western series and the first story was a gut wrenching, harrowing tale of the early west pioneers. When I finished the story and it was almost ready for publishing I received a letter from a reviewer asking me whether I had intentionally written the western as a comedy or just a parody (pre-computer days). I was devastated that my writing could be so misread. I went back and rewrote the complete story before I would allow it to go out, all because of one review. To this day I regret doing the rewrite.

Also, at least I am no longer cursed with being the biggest thread killer - or am I still?.

Texas hill country - makes me think of Helotes, Texas. I grew up in Laredo and my stomping grounds were San Antonio, Austin, Helotes, and Round Rock - then down to Corpus.

veinglory
04-15-2006, 12:24 AM
I'm just happy to strike fear in someone's heart. That doesn't happen often ;)

Kasey Mackenzie
04-15-2006, 12:48 AM
*quivers in her boots at Veinglory to make her happy*

Cathy C
04-15-2006, 03:06 AM
Kasey, clear out your message box, sweetie. I can't reply to your PM otherwise... :)

vein, you ALWAYS strike fear into my heart. But I like fear, so does that count? ;)

veinglory
04-15-2006, 03:08 AM
That counts *double*

[quietly very happy]

reph
04-15-2006, 08:42 AM
I'm just happy to strike fear in someone's heart. That doesn't happen oftenYou're working my side of the street!

Kasey Mackenzie
04-16-2006, 05:24 AM
Oops, sorry Cathy! Was busy all day with family stuff. Clearing it now. =)

dlcharles
04-16-2006, 06:59 AM
OK - in the past couple of weeks I have read the following romance works and will list them here in order to see whether they are "recognized".

Into the Darkness - GreyGallows - by Barbara Michaels
Outrun The Dark - Cecilia Bartholomew
Pearl - Cecilia Romero Cooper
Tender Savage - Phoebe Conn
Big Bad Wolf - Linda Jones
Noble and Ivy - Carole Howey
Noah's Women - Sylvie Sommerfield
Come Midnight - Suzanne Forste
Destiny - Barbara Benedict
Whispers of Passion - Sandra Dubay
Quicksilver - Pam McCutcheon
With Only One Kiss - Sonya T. Pelton
Abiding Hope - Melody Morgan
Desire In Disguise - Rebecca Brandewyne
Black Velvet - Patricia Wilson
Wild Card Bride - Joy Tucker
The Promise - Kersey Michaels
To Love A Man - Karen Robards
A Season Beyond A Kiss - Kathleene E. Woodwiss
Texas Fire - Caroline Bourne
Return To Opal Reach - Clarissa Garland
Playing With Fire - Victoria Thompson
Always Her Hero - Adrienne deWolfe
Scatter the Tempest - Joyce McLean
Sabrina Kane - Will Cook

It was mentioned that I should read a cross-section and gain a better understanding of "Romance". Does the above constitute such in your opinions?

Also, I stumbled across a very disturbing work copyrighted 1977 - Outrun The Dark - by Cecilia Bartholomew - Putnam -and by disturbing I mean that it drew me into the mind of a woman who spent thirteen years in a mental institution (from age eight to twenty-one) only to then be released back into society without being healed of her problems. Her struggles to accept she may have killed her little brother thirteen years ago, to accept she was hiding molestation by a family member, and to prevent it continuing when she is returned to her family home all brought me deeply into the complex storyline. This book I truly enjoyed and am amazed that I never heard of it.

AnneMarble
04-16-2006, 07:42 AM
OK - in the past couple of weeks I have read the following romance works and will list them here in order to see whether they are "recognized".

Into the Darkness - GreyGallows - by Barbara Michaels
Are there actually bookstores that shelve Barbara Michaels in romance?! Shows what they know.:ROFL: Most of the bookstores I know classify her in fiction, mystery, or even horror. She also writes as Elizabeth Peters, and she's an Egyptologist as well I believe.


It was mentioned that I should read a cross-section and gain a better understanding of "Romance". Does the above constitute such in your opinions?
Have you read many examples published in this century? :ROFL: Good grief, I think some of those people may be dead. ;) I recognized a few of those authors as writers I gave up on in my youth because even when I was young and less picky, I thought their books were silly. Glad to know they still live up to their earlier reputation. :D Where do you buy your romances, yard sales or thrift shops? ;)

Was that enough smileys for everyone? :)

dlcharles
04-16-2006, 03:17 PM
Are there actually bookstores that shelve Barbara Michaels in romance?! Shows what they know. Most of the bookstores I know classify her in fiction, mystery, or even horror. She also writes as Elizabeth Peters, and she's an Egyptologist as well I believe.
Have you read many examples published in this century? Good grief, I think some of those people may be dead.....Where do you buy your romances, yard sales or thrift shops?

From the price stickers I believe mostly WalMart. In my wife's bookstore she also takes books in trade and the most popular genres in these Ozark hills appear to be the romance stories for women (known locally as "Harleys") or westerns for the males.

Cathy C
04-16-2006, 05:06 PM
I think the "taking in trade" may be the problem here. You need to read more recent contemporary books. See if she has any of these authors:

Nora Roberts (writes contemporary - mega-selling author who also writes as J.D. Robb)
Linda Howard (writes both contemporary and paranormal)
Debbie Macomber (writes women's fiction - also just won the first ever Quill Award from Publisher's Weekly)
Sabrina Jeffries (writes historical)
Claire Delacroix (writes historical)
Lisa Gardner (writes contemporary)
Tori Carrington (writes series contemporary)
Barbara McMahon (writes series humorous romance)
Heather Graham (writes contemporary)
Jo Beverly (writes contemporary and suspense)
Madeline Hunter (writes historical)
Lisa Jackson (writes suspense)
JoAnn Ross (writes contemporary and suspense)
Sherrilyn Kenyon (writes paranormal)


All of the above are best selling, award-winning authors from the past year. There are hundreds more, but these should get you started on what readers are picking up on the shelves today, depending on what subgenre you're interested in writing.

Good luck!

Sakamonda
04-16-2006, 05:33 PM
I also recommend the following, especially if you want to laugh:

Katie Macalister: writers adorable romantic comedies in odd settings (like Renaissance fairs, Scottish sheep farms, British reality shows)

Mary Janice Davidson: also writes adorable romantic comedies in odd settings (which are often paranormal)

Carly Phillips: writes hilarious contemporary romantic comedies

Jennifer Weiner: More women's fiction with romantic subplots, but very intelligent, poignant, and relevant to real women's lives while still being funny. Lots of men I know read and enjoy her work as well as women.

preyer
04-18-2006, 05:28 PM
it's takes more than that to offend me, dl, lol. really, the only time i get mad at a poster is when they attack me personally. poke fun at me or my stories with the intent of playfullness and it's cool with me. :)

i agree, though, those kind of books you read are, to me, on the silly side. i think they're more escapist fantasy than meant to be taken seriously as a work of art. there's a place for that, and i think that's what a lot of people think of as what constitutes the typical romance novel (probably mostly guys think this). it's my perception that right now, 2006, 'romance' is such a wide-ranging genre that the 'romance' really has practically less meaning than it ever did. i mean, chick-lit doesn't always involve the girl getting her knight-in-shining-armour, no? yet that falls under the 'romance' umbrella.

for the story i've got in mind, i wouldn't call it 'romance' in the strictest sense like those books you ploughed through, i see it more as a drama with romantic elements. it's something i like to think i can get away with, at least, lol.

i think a lot of guys would like certain romance books if they gave them a chance. i honestly don't see a lot of guys liking 'her rippling bosum heaved like the seas by the tender beating of his throbbing manhood' (trust me, that's a brilliant sentence... for a parody). so, yeah, i think you can get away with a lot more under 'romance' than just about any other genre (maybe not, but for practical purposes, i'd say that statement is pretty close to being true, no?). it's got so many sub-genres that if you can't find a story you want to write within some fairly broad parametres, i don't know what to tell ya, lol.

if you look at fantasy from a certain time, you'd think they were written all by the same author. my guess is that's probably true of any genre at some point or another. you can write literature or pulp trash, that's what i like about the genre. and for me it's a project i can work on with my wife, it be a challenge and while there are probably some story guidelines i need to know, i think i can still write the story i want to write for the most part.

(sorry if more's been added to this since i started this thread yesterday evening and it's been sitting on my computer ever since. :))

preyer
04-18-2006, 05:41 PM
p.s., it sounds like you was living the dream there for a while. hopefully you picked up some insights, though, and this is pretty obvious but i say it anyway, the perspective of some whores probably isn't norm, lol. but, man, what a great set of character bases you could use, though i'd be careful which ones i used when applied to the main character, making sure her motivations are justified for the situation. i'd guess one of those women did it out of desperation and cried herself to sleep every night, while another was just a slut to begin with and her attitude was like, 'i'm going to spread my legs anyway, might as well get paid for it.' there was certainly some drugs filtering through the setting, too.

my question is, do they constitute lot lizards?

and has there ever been a romance set squarely in the middle of a whore house? that'd be a helluva book if you ask me, but it sounds pretty damn hard to write. basically, dl, if you don't write it, i will. :)

dlcharles
04-18-2006, 07:00 PM
p.s., it sounds like you was living the dream there for a while. hopefully you picked up some insights, though, and this is pretty obvious but i say it anyway, the perspective of some whores probably isn't norm, lol. but, man, what a great set of character bases you could use, though i'd be careful which ones i used when applied to the main character, making sure her motivations are justified for the situation. i'd guess one of those women did it out of desperation and cried herself to sleep every night, while another was just a slut to begin with and her attitude was like, 'i'm going to spread my legs anyway, might as well get paid for it.' there was certainly some drugs filtering through the setting, too.

my question is, do they constitute lot lizards?

and has there ever been a romance set squarely in the middle of a whore house? that'd be a helluva book if you ask me, but it sounds pretty damn hard to write. basically, dl, if you don't write it, i will. :)



Lot lozards - not in the least, that is a misconception and primarily slang, and absolutely no drugs back then were tolerated - it was a business run by very strict rules. Remembering back (it was a very long time ago) I recall one or two were going to college - one to become a physician and the other I don't recall what. One was a bottom feeder (no pun intended) and the rest were often married with children or single. It was a reasonably safe place to work (I made certain of this) and the turnover rate wasn't unusual for that line of work. Contrary to most people's opinions of 'whores', I found them to be no more deviant than the average individual - just more honest about what they did; it is up to the paying customer to desire the deviation. I later became a hairdresser in San Antonio in an upscale chain of salons - and there was where I found the true lot lizards. Married women on the prowl made the movie "Shampoo" a farce compared to the real life - rather akin to deer hunter widows at opening season when they hit the bars looking. But that is also another story never to be told. Romance in a whorehouse - it happens more than you think throughout history - and most of them made excellent wives and mothers.

preyer
04-19-2006, 07:57 AM
i call them whores because that's a synonym for a prostitute, right? not meant to be a derogatory term, per se. the idea here is there's a broad spectrum of motivations for being a whore you could use to write a story. :)

dragonjax
04-19-2006, 01:52 PM
Don't forget to read our own Cathy's fabulous paranormal romances, HUNTER'S MOON, MOON'S WEB, and (my favorite) TOUCH OF EVIL. She and her coauthor are award-winners for a reason!

preyer
04-19-2006, 05:57 PM
here's a follow-up, dl: do you suppose there's a difference between house whores and streetwalkers from a psychological profile standpoint?

many a year ago, i had a brief correspondence with a paranormal romance writer whom i 'met' on a 'gladiator: the movie' board of all places. i'd never heard of such a genre, but lo and behold i found her book on the bookshelf. it wasn't my thing, personally, but i found the concept an interesting mix of genres. at the time, i'm not sure there was much of a market for paranormal romance, but obviously now there's enough of 'em to make mention of it as a sub-genre.

a couple of years ago, i picked up one of my wife's books, a sci-fi romance, and thought it was truly a bizarre thing. these sub-genres are inevitable, and i wonder how some of these compare with the other genres conventions, know what i mean?

if it hasn't already been done, given time i'm sure there'll be a gay romance in space between inter-racial people trying to solve the mystery of the space vampires who bring in a lot of victorian influence. sounds like a novel to me. point is, 'romance' in itself is no more limiting than sci-fi or horror, imo. in fact, if the writer has a good grasp of character development and character interaction, 'romance' should almost be second nature to most writers, no? 'romance' in a more traditional sense (correct me if i'm wrong here) is essentially finding a way for person A to fall in love with person B, isn't it?

AnneMarble
04-19-2006, 06:53 PM
and has there ever been a romance set squarely in the middle of a whore house? that'd be a helluva book if you ask me, but it sounds pretty damn hard to write. basically, dl, if you don't write it, i will. :)
In the bodice ripper days, it used to be fairly common for the heroines to get captured and become a prostitute for a while, until finally escaping. But this wasn't a serious treatment of the topic. For most writers, it was just an excuse to throw in more sex scenes even when the hero and heroine were separated, and make us feel even more sorry for the heroine.

However, I have read novels where the heroine was forced into prostitution, got out of that life, and eventually found love. Usually, she leaves the life before meeting the hero. One exception is Mary Balogh's A Precious Jewel. Or is that The Secret Pearl? I always get those two confused.

Also, I have heard very good things about Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers, which I believe is about an abused woman who becomes a prostitute. Somewhere, I have a copy of the original historical romance version of the book. It was also rewritten and released as an inspirational romance.

dlcharles
04-20-2006, 07:16 AM
i call them whores because that's a synonym for a prostitute, right? not meant to be a derogatory term, per se. the idea here is there's a broad spectrum of motivations for being a whore you could use to write a story. :)

Preyer: You are showing yourself as a most insightful, thoughtful,and caring individual beneath that gruff exterior - your wife appears to have done a very good job of training you.

A prostitute would usually be someone who offers a service for a reward of some kind. In this instance we are talking about a sexual service for money, so yes for that point - unless they only do it part time, at which they would not be a prostitute, but a substitute (sic). Insofar as the romanticism of a prostitute, no one is more of a true romantic who awaits the proverbial Prince Charming to fall in love with them and take them out of the life - than a "working girl". On that same note they are also usually the most soft-hearted touch for a hard luck story you can find. I am not talking about drug addicted ladies of the night, but of the average non-addict hooker - seldom can they turn down a stray of any kind - human or animal. Gigantic psychological factors at work which cause such.

There is also a big gap between "street-walkers" (usually pimped out regardless of weather conditions), "call Girls" (upper classed educated and very expensive - perfect escorts for any social occasions), and what I'll call "House Ladies" (work out of a single location managed by a qualified overseer and upscaled). *NOTE: Ladies, please do not send me those nasty letters from your union steward - I am trying to keep this very simple in explanation.* I still have a friendship of many years with several wonderful women who are very successful in their career choice, and it is only a mutual friendship of respect.

From the largest metro areas to the tiniest rural town there is a case of demand and supply, with demand being the multiplier. Near where I live is a little burg of about 350 residents. I know of three ladies who supplement their income as "therapists of sorts" in that one tiny unincorporated town.

Again, back to the romance factors, you are correct in my opinion as to the story concepts of this thread regarding romance. I believe it could make a fantastic story - IF the author could set aside any pre-conceived notions about the business stigmas and just concentrate on writing about various romanticism involved.

I returned to add a footnote, preyer: A cop pulls over an attractive female late at night. He offers a deal to not write a citation or make an arrest if the female submits to his desires. If the female submits which one is the prostitute - the one with the authority or the one submitting to the authority? Make no mistake, this situation constantly occurs throughout the country.

icerose
04-20-2006, 07:54 AM
I found your post rather funny. It reminded me of my first introduction to romance literature and it has taken me...well I still don't read romance because of it. But I remember similar passages as you quoted and thinking to myself "Can that really happen?"

I do realize these are not the best nor the majority of romance literature, it is simply my first encounter with it and the kind that sticks in my head even to this day.

Ironically enough I wrote a romance and have two others planned. As well as a series of paranormal romance. Romance, I feel, Is actually one of the most flexible genres with all the subcatagories and such. I don't think I have a single book, even those outside the romance department, that doesn't have a vein of romance through it. It is such a part of my life, I can't imagine having characters without it playing a part in their lives as well.

I am one of the last people to want to watch a chick flick and such, which again strikes me as so odd that I have written a romance and have others planned.

So if I can write a romance, you certainly can, and it sounds as if you have much more experience than I. Try reading The Notebook. I have heard its well written and was created by a male.

And I do believe those types of romances are escapist fantasies written with the tired housewife/single woman in mind. (I do not know for certain, but it is my guess.)

dlcharles
04-20-2006, 06:00 PM
I found your post rather funny. It reminded me of my first introduction to romance literature and it has taken me...well I still don't read romance because of it. But I remember similar passages as you quoted and thinking to myself "Can that really happen?"

I do realize these are not the best nor the majority of romance literature, it is simply my first encounter with it and the kind that sticks in my head even to this day.

Ironically enough I wrote a romance and have two others planned. As well as a series of paranormal romance. Romance, I feel, Is actually one of the most flexible genres with all the subcatagories and such. I don't think I have a single book, even those outside the romance department, that doesn't have a vein of romance through it. It is such a part of my life, I can't imagine having characters without it playing a part in their lives as well.

I am one of the last people to want to watch a chick flick and such, which again strikes me as so odd that I have written a romance and have others planned.

So if I can write a romance, you certainly can, and it sounds as if you have much more experience than I. Try reading The Notebook. I have heard its well written and was created by a male.

And I do believe those types of romances are escapist fantasies written with the tired housewife/single woman in mind. (I do not know for certain, but it is my guess.)

Writing in any genre there is always a protagonist and an antagonist, either in single(s) or multiple(s) form, whether ghetto or galaxial, and ordinarily the protagonist wins out and manages to survive heartbreak only to find true love during the knuckle-chewing life of the story. If only!

There is, in my opinion, a vast gulf between a female's view/concept of romance and a male's concept. The male mental fantasies are commonly considered to be "crude and base" compared to the "escapist fantasies" of the tired houswife/single woman you mentioned. Personally I have never attempted to get in touch with my supposed "feminine side" (if I even have one) - if I desire to get in touch with the feminine part of me I will simply wrap my arms around my wife. No one ever rambles on about the psychological nuances of a woman wanting to get in touch with her masculine side in order to better deal with the male heart. I'm chuckling to myself as I write this, Icerose, at the mental image of a petite female pushing her billed cap back on her head as she squints into the glare of the dawn's rising sunlight, using her tongue to move the plug of chaw baccy from one cheek to the other as she spits tobacco juice unerringly at a horned toad on the ground. I can visualize her muscled sweaty arms as she then wipes the tobacco juice from her chin and rubs it on her sweat-stained jeans. Notice the big red handkerchief hanging from a rear pocket of the jeans? I wonder why she failed to utilize that instead of wiping with her hand. Ahhhh, the thrilling breathlessness of her bosom as she draws in air preparatory to performing such a remarkable tobacco spitting feat with a natural grace ......and so on. Believe it or not, here in the Ozarks of my Arkansas hills the above female is quite common to behold - and quite in demand. So in that respect she would be considered very romantic.

From a male perspective, if I may: Your name of "Icerose" is a perfect example, with the "imagined" connotations inherent to the male mentality it implies a magical quality of something beyond the ken of ordinary men. To be a "Icerose" brings forth the Tinker Bell qualities of magic and Peter Pan wonderland, a mystical being from the far off crystal-like kingdoms of fantasy, a super heroine of the Justice League of America type endowed with powers. The name itself creates a tingle at the edges of the male mind frame which makes the heart beat faster in anticipation of the concept. The brittle freeze of an Icerose which only a man-above-men can have a remote chance of thawing into a raging furnace of adoring love. See what I mean? Male romance!

I have been married to my wife for almost thirty years now and she is still the most beautiful and sensuous woman I have ever known in my entire life. She tells me I have finally reached the point of old age that my being ugly has its own handsomeness. Both of us are at the stage of life where the "Blanche Effect" (Golden Girls) is in total control, but the romance is stronger than when we first met. My daughters remarked many times about wishing they could end up with a marriage like mom and me and wanted to know how we seemed so compatible. They cannot seem to understand that we worked at it for many years. We developed a complete trust in each other which takes precedence over everything, a mutual respect for the intelligence of the other (even though she is smarter than I am).

Romantic, to me, is sitting at the kitchen table and watching my wife move about as she cooks (she is a very recognized gourmet artist and cooks numerous different nationalities of cuisine), being never more content than when she is preparing foods and she tends to hum or sing while doing so. Romantic is sitting in the living room of an evening with both of us reading and occasionally sharing a touching passage in our respective books. Romantic is sometimes passing hours together without feeling it necessary to shatter the comfortable silence with words. Romantic, to me, is knowing that my wife knows the very fiber of my being without my feeling the need to attempt explanations for something which another may not understand. And romantic is massaging her feet while she reads. And, finally, romance is knowing that after almost thirty years my heart still skips a beat sometimes when she looks at me in a certain way or kisses me and it takes my breath away, leaving me rather giddy as a teenager on a first date. But one cannot write such as this as a novel.

icerose
04-20-2006, 08:07 PM
I think I tend to write more of a males romance than a female's romance myself.

Not the chewing tobacco part YUCK!

I see the allure of the escapist fantasy type, but it isn't for me. I have been a tomboy all my life. The romances that draw me are like Ever After, where you have a strong woman who can take care of herself and doesn't hesitate to get her hands dirty, but can still be a woman.

I came up with IceRose for myself at the age of 12 when I had dreams of being a fighter pilot. That was going to be my call sign. Even to this day I find the name fits me in a lot of ways, everything I percieve/wish myself to be. I love it. :D

My definition of romance is the same as yours. I have only been married for 6 years now, but I do know what you are talking about.

And I think yours would make an excellent romance falling in the new harlequin line Everlasting I believe it is called. It is focused on a lifetime romance rather than the whirlwind part.

I would suggest write it, then go from there, you never know what people will like, although I wouldn't suggest the chewing tobacco part. :e2thud:

Angela
04-29-2006, 10:43 PM
Don't forget to read our own Cathy's fabulous paranormal romances, HUNTER'S MOON, MOON'S WEB, and (my favorite) TOUCH OF EVIL. She and her coauthor are award-winners for a reason!

Oooooh!!!!! I just saw her books at our local grocery store! (I live in a small town, and we don't have a regular bookstore here, except for a Christian bookstore that's opening up.) I wondered if they were written by one of "our" authors!! Now I've got to go back and pick them up for certain!!

Cathy C
04-30-2006, 12:25 AM
Cool! Thanks for telling me, Angela. We were afraid that a lot of the secondary markets (like grocery stores) were a bit put off by the cover in smaller towns. Glad to see it made it to some places (although my own town isn't one of the more "enlightened" ones in the Bible belt... :roll: )

Angela
04-30-2006, 08:02 AM
LOL!! Well, Cathy I live in the Bible Belt, too! (And in rural South Georgia, no less!)

Our local grocery chain was started by a local man, and he GREW, but they recently sold (well, they say merged, but I think the late patriarchs of the family are rolling in their graves. This "merger" occurred shortly after the death of the head of the family. The son of the man who originally started the company, the son who started working in the family store by selling Coca-Cola to the customers and cleaning up. The man who KNEW what it was like to WORK for what the family built up. Everyone thinks that the grandchildren and children only care about the money, and even though they assured our community that there would be no backlash over this little "merger", the local warehouse, which supplied ALL of the stores with goods, will close its doors this summer. One of the other company's warehouses over in South or North Carolina will start supplying the stores. We're a small, mostly farming community, and I can't tell you what this is going to do to our community job-wise! *sigh* Sorry for the rant.)

Anyway, they recently merged with Delhaze, (sp?) the company that owns several grocery store chains, including (I think) Food Lion. I don't recall seeing the Silhouette/Harlequin paperback rack in the store until recently, so I think that the merger might have brought it in. :) Anyway, I went in there this evening and I couldn't find the rack!! I asked a friend of mine in the pharmacy (where the rack was originally located) what had happened to it, and she said they had moved it up in front of the registers! When I went to it, guess what??? Your book was GONE!!!!! :cry: Now I'm going to have to try to find it somewhere else!!

Edited: Excuse me, I said the Harlequin/Silhouette rack.....:e2shower: I looked at that rack the same day, but then I went to your site and looked at the cover. :e2smack: I know I saw it in there, so I'm going to check in the other section the next time I go in there!!! **walks away grumbling about how embarassed she is**

Gillhoughly
05-05-2006, 06:19 PM
Dude--forget writing a romance!

I want to hear about your life (and "hard" times) at that truckstop!

You've got a dang fun coming of age book in that experience. Just cast a young Burt Reynolds as "you" and cut loose!

Woot-woot!


:D