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WriterDude
09-12-2015, 05:00 PM
If the American president travelled by train, internationally, instead of Air Force One, what might it be called?

Rail Road One? Any thing more plausible?

King Neptune
09-12-2015, 05:43 PM
It was named Ferdinand Magellan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferdinand_Magellan_%28railcar%29

It was also known as United States Railcar No. 1 after it was rebuilt.

WriterDude
09-12-2015, 11:01 PM
It was named Ferdinand Magellan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferdinand_Magellan_%28railcar%29

It was also known as United States Railcar No. 1 after it was rebuilt.

Thanks. I already saw that.

My story is present day and for reasons of plot, rail is preferred over air for some international presidential journeys. Suppose it's a question of protocol/nomenclature. Does Rail Road One sound too cheesy?

Trebor1415
09-12-2015, 11:21 PM
Thanks. I already saw that.

My story is present day and for reasons of plot, rail is preferred over air for some international presidential journeys. Suppose it's a question of protocol/nomenclature. Does Rail Road One sound too cheesy?

Yes, too cheesy. (It sounds like something the Secret Service agents might call it sarcasticly)

SBibb
09-13-2015, 02:52 AM
(Note: I know nothing on the subject...)

What about Rail Car One? Or something like that?

Doesn't sound too cheesy to me, but I'm the last person to ask. (Seriously. I have a group called the Camaraderie of Evil in one of my stories, so I may not be the best person to suggest names).

Good luck finding a name for it. :-)

King Neptune
09-13-2015, 03:26 AM
Thanks. I already saw that.

My story is present day and for reasons of plot, rail is preferred over air for some international presidential journeys. Suppose it's a question of protocol/nomenclature. Does Rail Road One sound too cheesy?

What else would one call such a thing? If it a whole train, then United States Train No. 1 probably would be the thing, unless someone decided that some evocative name would be better.

jclarkdawe
09-13-2015, 03:51 AM
Here's some scenes from Obama's trip from Philadelphia to DC. It's the last train trip that I know of. http://content.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1872587,00.html

The railroad would probably call it "the Obama special." Secret service probably worries about the individuals and not the train itself. The press seems to go with "special," which is the appropriate term. Trains are either scheduled or "special."

Individual rail cars can have names.The rail car Obama rode in is the "Georgia 300." See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgia_300

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Trebor1415
09-13-2015, 06:06 AM
How about, "The Presidential Special?"

blacbird
09-13-2015, 06:55 AM
If you're writing fiction, make it up. That's what fiction does.

caw

cornflake
09-13-2015, 06:58 AM
Thanks. I already saw that.

My story is present day and for reasons of plot, rail is preferred over air for some international presidential journeys. Suppose it's a question of protocol/nomenclature. Does Rail Road One sound too cheesy?

Yes, that sounds cheesy to me, but I have a broader question - we're shipping an entire train overseas? Can you fly trains? It seems to me it'd have to be shipped by boat, but I dunno. That seems crazy though.

jclarkdawe
09-13-2015, 07:42 AM
I should have mentioned this. US trains can run in the US, Canada, and Mexico. Other than that, no, it's not going to happen.

There are compatibility issues such as couples, station heights, and safety devices. They would need to have the signaling system installed. Train crews are qualified both on the equipment and the route. Someone who operates a train is required to pass a rigorous test showing knowledge of the route, including all road crossings, sidings, et cetera. It's not like a car where you can get in and just drive. And there are significant differences in how controls are located between European trains and US trains.

But the big thing is that the Europeans would not accept our crap on their tracks. Our freight trains are comparable, but our passenger trains suck. Old equipment that gets up to 150 mph if there is a tailwind and its downhill. European trains run new equipment at 300 kph. US trains would slow down the service and provide a lower quality. Europeans travel a lot by train because it's cheaper and better than flying.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

cornflake
09-13-2015, 07:52 AM
I wondered about that too, whether you could just plop a U.S. train down on like, Italian tracks and have it run, but had no idea if that was a thing or if it's like planes where there're not so many big-time manufacturers and they're global. Apparently that's a thing.

blacbird
09-13-2015, 08:08 AM
This thread brings up a complete digression and curiosity question: Who was the first sitting U.S President to visit a foreign nation? And, secondarily, how did he travel there?

It's not a quiz. I simply don't know.

caw

WriterDude
09-13-2015, 11:57 AM
For context, I have a (magic portal) plot device, which I won't elaborate because I haven't finished it yet and discussing ideas seems to rob my ability to then write so you'll have to forgive my coyness. Needless to say, the practicalities of moving a whole train from Europe to the US are covered.

Europe and in particular the UK, have a more restrictive loading gauge get than the US so it would have to be built to UK standards. American trains are too big to run here, but British trains like the Flying Scotsman have happily done tours of America and Australia.

Coupling, signalling and safety standards do vary between countries but rolling stock can be fitted for multiple systems. We have British locomotives working in France that return to Britain only for maintenance. The most successful loco design running in Europe now was built in North America, and in Canada there are sleeper carriages in service that were built for overnight Anglo European services that never happened because of the rise of the low cost airline.

Train crew could be an issue because route knowledge is essential.

We do have the Royal Train in the UK which is fixed stock and it's something along those lines. With sleeping accommodation, crew facilities, secret services and probably even space for a limo.

jclarkdawe
09-13-2015, 08:23 PM
This thread brings up a complete digression and curiosity question: Who was the first sitting U.S President to visit a foreign nation? And, secondarily, how did he travel there?

It's not a quiz. I simply don't know.

caw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_international_trips_made_by_the_President_ of_the_United_States#Presidential_International_Tr ips_Pre-Aircraft

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

frimble3
09-14-2015, 01:39 AM
Perhaps it would be more practical for the British government to loan the Royal Train to the U.S. for the length of the trip? I can't see the President and the Queen both wanting to use the train simultaneously. (The security double-checking would probably make it impractical). However, as far as train crew, wouldn't they just stick a couple of experienced British crewmembers - at least an engineer - on as advisors?

WeaselFire
09-14-2015, 04:36 PM
First President to visit outside the United States? George Washington. He wasn't even born in the US. :)

Jeff

King Neptune
09-14-2015, 05:09 PM
First President to visit outside the United States? George Washington. He wasn't even born in the US. :)

Jeff

I think you meant Peyton Randolph.

Bing Z
09-14-2015, 05:29 PM
I have no input regarding a train name, maybe other than Valentine One. But traveling internationally with self-provided train engines and cars may be a little troublesome in certain parts of the world due to varying track widths (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Track_gauge). So either the president has to have several sets of trains or he may have to ride on trains loaned to him by untrustworthy governments serviced by T-type Nemesis.

King Neptune
09-14-2015, 05:48 PM
I have no input regarding a train name, maybe other than Valentine One. But traveling internationally with self-provided train engines and cars may be a little troublesome in certain parts of the world due to varying track widths (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Track_gauge). So either the president has to have several sets of trains or he may have to ride on trains loaned to him by untrustworthy governments serviced by T-type Nemesis.

Track width is not a problem, because they just change the wheel assemblies.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmBsdh1YfDk

WriterDude
09-14-2015, 10:13 PM
Track width is not a problem, because they just change the wheel assemblies.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmBsdh1YfDk

That's pretty cool, but why bother stopping the train?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiH4kt14yGw

King Neptune
09-14-2015, 11:52 PM
That's pretty cool, but why bother stopping the train?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiH4kt14yGw

They usually stop the trains, because they changes happen at borders, where there wold be stops in regard to passports and cargo in any case.

blacbird
09-15-2015, 05:24 AM
The first President to travel by spaceship will be a significant item of news.

caw

WeaselFire
09-15-2015, 06:42 AM
I think you meant Peyton Randolph.

Only by technicality though. And the ten others... :)

Jeff

PeteMC
09-21-2015, 06:21 PM
I would have thought Amtrak One would work for a name, in the same spirit as Airforce One

WriterDude
09-24-2015, 12:14 AM
Amtrak One. I like that. I can picture that at King's Cross, with it's pressed steel and aluminium, decorated with reds and blues.

That'll do nicely.

WeaselFire
09-24-2015, 12:31 AM
Just a note, the movie White House Down has a scene where the President grabs the keys to a limo and they're labeled Ground Force One.

Jeff

WriterDude
09-24-2015, 12:39 AM
Ha ha. We had a gardening show on BBC called Ground Force with Alan Titchmarsh.

Alan Titchmarsh and presidential limo in the same headspace can only lead to madness.

PeteMC
09-24-2015, 02:06 AM
POTUS and Titchmarsh are back, and this time it's herbaceous borders!