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clotje
01-27-2005, 01:50 PM
When I was writing my first mystery novel (which I have completed now) I had a set-up of the storyline but by the time I was 3/4 through my ending changed and a new twist developed which made me yelp with excitement. Does this happen to you too?
Iíve started writing my second novel now and canít wait to see if it happens againÖ.

macalicious731
01-28-2005, 02:06 AM
Yes. And isn't it exciting? I especially love when little mundane details you place in the beginning of the draft suddenly give leeway to entire new possibilites halfway through the novel. It's like your subconscious has been trying to tell you something the whole time.

katdad
01-28-2005, 06:33 AM
Yes, this happens to me all the time in my novels. I've even plotted ahead for the protagonist and then found myself doing something totally different.

Maryn
02-15-2005, 11:39 PM
Does this mean that the difficult-to-plot middle, where I've been languishing for weeks, is penetrable after all and I should just dive in writing, because something adequately twisted will arrive?

Nah, I didn't think so. Dang it.

Maryn

katdad
02-16-2005, 11:26 AM
Does this mean that the difficult-to-plot middle, where I've been languishing for weeks, is penetrable after all and I should just dive in writing, because something adequately twisted will arrive?

Nah, I didn't think so. Dang it. Maryn

If you're stuck about a plot twist, my recommendation is to simply charge ahead and keep writing.

What happens is that your subconscious will keep churning and bubbling all the while, and it will be stimulated by your continuing to write. Eventually, as if by magic, a great plot twist will reveal itself, seeming from nowhere.

In fact it's come from your own fevered brain. It may later require some adjustments or minor revisions, but it you'll be fine. Promise.

Maryn
02-16-2005, 05:57 PM
I know, I know. I just have trouble giving myself permission to do such a thing, since I've written myself into a corner more than once. (I'm still there, too.)

But it's snowing hard and I don't want to go anywhere, so maybe today's the day to take the plunge, eh?

Maryn

katdad
02-16-2005, 08:28 PM
I know, I know. I just have trouble giving myself permission to do such a thing, since I've written myself into a corner more than once. (I'm still there, too.) But it's snowing hard and I don't want to go anywhere, so maybe today's the day to take the plunge, eh?Maryn
You'll be okay. All writers get stuck at times. But for me the temptations to slink away are endless. In Houston we can't use the excuse of being snowed in to force ourselves to the keyboard. Today it will be about 68F. Sigh.

I also suggest that you may try to skip forward in the book to a chapter that particularly interests you -- a certain sequence or plot event. I do this all the time.

For example, in my 3rd novel, now in progress, I am now writing a few chapters that encompass my private detective protagonist and his erstwhile girlfriend. He's from Houston and is now staying in Austin a few weeks, visiting an old college pal who's being threatened. The gal he's been dating drives up to Austin for the weekend, and they get together for dinner.

He's nervous about this since she's now staying at a hotel, and it's in his mind that this may be the night for sex to finally rear its head. So those thoughts pester him during the evening.

For some reason, this sequence of the story line intrigued me, so I skipped ahead and now I'm writing those 3-4 chapters.

Later, I'll probably need to "interrupt" the romantic evening -- his college pal phones in panic -- maybe the house has been vandalized in a drive-by, or some such -- and the romance will have to be put on hold.

You can see how my plot-brain is bubbling along with this. By simply starting to write a certain series of middling chapters, I'm already coming up with ideas on how to drive the overall story.

This skip-ahead technique has always worked for me when I hit a dry spot.

If that fails, I shut off the computer and go drink beer, play pool, chase women, or some other meaningful enterprise. The novel can wait a while.

mudflat_marsh_hawk
04-17-2005, 01:42 PM
I too skip around in the manuscript, writing new chapters when I'm faced with a dead-end or don't know how to proceed. It's very frustrating not to be able to write in a linear style from beginning to end, but, I always have taken the "scenic route."

I somewhat envy writers who outline, outline, outline. Then proceed to bang it all out on the keyboard, as outlined. I try to have some semblance of an outline...a plot progression; but, for the main part, I collect a few characters and start writing to see what happens.

:Sun: