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SerenaAkeroyd
07-28-2015, 02:55 PM
Hi!
I have a piece of (fictional) land. I'm in the 70s. I know there's crude oil underneath my property. How do I know this? Lol. Are there signs that I would see to tell me crude oil is there? Or is just pot luck?
This is in New Mexico.
thanks so much
Serena

King Neptune
07-28-2015, 05:10 PM
Hi!
I have a piece of (fictional) land. I'm in the 70s. I know there's crude oil underneath my property. How do I know this? Lol. Are there signs that I would see to tell me crude oil is there? Or is just pot luck?
This is in New Mexico.
thanks so much
Serena

The geology of an area usually indicates whether there might be hydrocarbons. Those include the general type of bedrock minerals; most hydrocarbons are found in sedimentary basins, but there are pockets of hydrocarbons that are trapped by seismic activity. Then there are gas deposits related to subduction zones.

There are many signs, and there are many websites that describe such things. You probably should look into whether the geology of the area you're interested in ever has hydrocarbons.

And is that area in or near one of the major petroleum areas in New Mexico? Map:
https://geoinfo.nmt.edu/faq/energy/petroleum/home.html

SerenaAkeroyd
07-28-2015, 08:09 PM
Thank you so much, King Neptune.
As a layman, would there be any visual signs? Or would they all involve scientific research?
So, you say gas deposits...? Would that mean there were small 'geysers'?
I'll definitely look into that website :)

King Neptune
07-28-2015, 10:16 PM
Thank you so much, King Neptune.
As a layman, would there be any visual signs? Or would they all involve scientific research?
So, you say gas deposits...? Would that mean there were small 'geysers'?
I'll definitely look into that website :)

There are visual clues for the pros, but you'd have to study them. Clues include fault lines, synclines and anticlines, and salt domes are also a good sign. I don't think there are any seeps in NM, but there may be some. If you want some layman to happen upon an oil deposit, then you might invent a seep, where oil comes to the surface. There are gas seeps also, but they don't leave clear signs, because the gas dissipates into the air, while the oil seep forms a pool.

WeaselFire
07-29-2015, 02:10 AM
The reason geologists had so much employment in the 60's and 70's is exactly your situation. And it does take a trained, and somewhat experienced, geologist to determine the potential for oil. For a decent reference, contact the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (http://www.sdsmt.edu/). Their museum should be able to help you.

Alternately, if oil has been discovered on lands adjacent, it's more likely it will exist on this land. If you need a true layman, use a dowser. They've been uncannily accurate at finding both oil and water for just about ever.

Jeff

SerenaAkeroyd
07-29-2015, 02:19 PM
Thanks so much, guys.
And LOL, I always thought they were old wives' tales. Dowsers actually worked? Or doodlebugs...I've just wiki'ed them :P Apparently, they're doodlebugs for petroleum :D

King Neptune
07-29-2015, 04:42 PM
Thanks so much, guys.
And LOL, I always thought they were old wives' tales. Dowsers actually worked? Or doodlebugs...I've just wiki'ed them :P Apparently, they're doodlebugs for petroleum :D

Yes, dowsing works, even though there is no scientific explanation for it.