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snowwmonkey
07-21-2015, 09:48 PM
Hello there,
For some time now I've wanted to collect a batch of poems into a chapbook. The self-publishing route is an option, but I'd love to try my luck with a few small presses first. Having enquired a few of my favorite poetry presses, I've noticed that most presses prefer a chapbook to be fully unpublished. Unfortunately my poems have all been published in online magazines. I've yet to come across any publishers willing to consider this manuscript. Any suggestions or advice are truly appreciated! thanks :)

Kylabelle
07-21-2015, 10:23 PM
Hi snowwmonkey, welcome to AW! I don't have an answer for you except that your experience is how I understand it works: if something has been published, other publishers are usually not interested.

I think probably the only option is self-publishing in this case but I'll be watching this thread in case anyone else has different information.

Stew21
07-21-2015, 10:46 PM
Self-publishing is probably the best option, as Kylabelle said, most publishers want first rights. so for this previously-published material, that would probably be best.
If you want to go the route of a small press, you'll need to submit previously-unpublished work.

There certainly might be exceptions, and if you keep looking, you may find a press willing to take the previously published work you have, but it isn't likely, I don't believe.

snowwmonkey
07-21-2015, 10:58 PM
Thank you Kylabelle and Stew21, that's what my impression was as well. I will ask around a couple more publishers and will report here if I have any news.

Stew21
07-21-2015, 11:18 PM
Definitely do let us know if you find out anything different.

Good luck.

alaktas
08-01-2015, 02:12 AM
Is there an "industry norm" as to how long a poetry book (or what is referred to as a 'chapbook') should be? 30 pages? 50 pages?

Or, to put the question another way, how many poems are typically found in an average chapbook?

I would assume that if one has currently written 10 poems, and each poem is 1 page long, that would seem to be nowhere near the length to even publish in a book form and would thus have to be published in another medium.

Thanks

snowwmonkey
08-10-2015, 12:32 AM
Hi alaktas, every publisher has his own definition of chapbook length manuscripts. But generally speaking, I've come across many that considered 5-15 pages to be of micro-chapbook length and 15-25 pages chapbook length. Again it can vary and it should be clearly mentioned in each publisher's guidelines what lengths they are looking for. For me personally, I'd say anything under 50 pages isn't a full-length poetry book.. By the way I am giving up on finding publisher and it's not because my poems are previously published. It seems everyone is asking reading fees now : (

alaktas
08-26-2015, 02:47 AM
Hi alaktas, every publisher has his own definition of chapbook length manuscripts. But generally speaking, I've come across many that considered 5-15 pages to be of micro-chapbook length and 15-25 pages chapbook length. Again it can vary and it should be clearly mentioned in each publisher's guidelines what lengths they are looking for. For me personally, I'd say anything under 50 pages isn't a full-length poetry book.. By the way I am giving up on finding publisher and it's not because my poems are previously published. It seems everyone is asking reading fees now : (

Thanks snowwmonkey. I appreciate your response. Best of luck to you in your poetry.

RainGore
08-31-2015, 03:04 AM
This is excellent information! I was curious as to what might actually constitute a Chapbook. I am an avid InDesign developer (epub) and was wondering how many pages might constitute a book (printed electronically). Thank u again for this post. I was just wondering if there were any poets who had success with putting a Chapbook up on Amazon/BN?

veinglory
08-31-2015, 06:37 PM
Poetry publishers are likely to consider, even prefer, previously published work if they were markets with literary standing and the work has reverted and is no longer "live" anywhere on the internet.