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anastasiareeves
07-04-2015, 07:39 PM
This week I found myself binge-buying books by Brad Meltzer after he went on back to back podcasts I listen to and was just so intriguing and smart and philosophical I could not resist finding everything he's ever written despite never having read a word of it.

Brad's podcast episodes were Kevin Smith's Fatman on Batman (Brad is also a comic book writer, which is why he was on that, but talks a lot about his whole writing career) and The Nerdist, where he talked even more about life and writing and managed to not repeat anything he said in the Kevin Smith interview despite doing them back to back.

Has anyone ever been so taken by an author in an interview they decided it was a must to read their novels, or whatever else they have written?

Brightdreamer
07-04-2015, 08:31 PM
I heard Simon R. Green at a con earlier this year, and grabbed one of his books because I found him so entertaining to listen to. (Deathstalker - It's still in the TBR pile.) At the same con, and on the same panel, I also was impressed by Django Wexler - I'm keeping an eye out for his stuff at Half Price Books and B&N, or if/when I get some spare cash for an Amazon binge.

(I also grabbed a book, and have others on my to-look-for list, due to panelists recommending them at that con. And I bought one from an author in the hall on a whim - Matt Youngmark's Time Travel Dinosaur - that was a real kick and a half to read. It was a good con...)

shadowwalker
07-05-2015, 12:30 AM
Most writers whose interviews I've heard or read were, well, not impressive - boorish or boring, typically. But thankfully I keep the author separate from their writing, and pick up books based on whether I know and like the author's work, or if it looks interesting on perusal.

anastasiareeves
07-05-2015, 12:51 AM
I have yet to attend a book con or a con where an author is speaking, aside from WonderCon a couple years ago when Cassandra Clare happened to be a part of the panel for her movie adaptation. I was already sucked in to her Shadowhunters series so her Q&A session was just a bonus. But I do listen to a lot of podcasts.

I read a lot of books based on the blurb and the covers, just every now and then when an author who writes in a genre I rarely read in is well spoken and interesting, I find myself wandering into their genre to give them a try.

jjdebenedictis
07-05-2015, 03:10 AM
I had kind of the opposite reaction once?

Not that I found the author too awesome to read -- rather that the author, Sam Sykes, was UNBELIEVABLY entertaining and smart in person (seriously, he's hilarious), but every time I try to read one of his books, I can't get into it.

And that seems like such a shame, because the guy's got a wicked sense of humour, is completely gonzo-in-a-good-way, and manages to say very clever things while keeping you entertained. I'm sure he's a great writer, but there's something about his writing style that isn't my cup of tea.

ElaineA
07-05-2015, 03:55 AM
I had this experience reading an interview of Andy Weir. I bought The Martian immediately upon finishing the article and wasn't the least bit disappointed.

Captcha
07-05-2015, 04:06 AM
I've absolutely had this experience with non-fiction, but I don't think I ever have with fiction. Maybe I need to start listening more to fiction authors...

anastasiareeves
07-05-2015, 04:24 AM
I'll let you guys know when I have the books in hand and know whether or not the writing lives up to his interviewing skills.

I haven't had the opposite happen yet, although sometimes when I find out an author's politics I can't look past them. I try not to delve too deeply into the people I like to read, in general.

BeeGem
07-05-2015, 04:28 AM
I've had this a couple of times - read or heard an interview with an author, encountered them at a Con or on twitter or somewhere else, then picked up their books and loved them. I've also had the opposite experience where I find an author really entertaining but just can't get into their books, no matter how hard I try. :Shrug:

Jamesaritchie
07-05-2015, 07:50 PM
Constantly. I love listening to writer interviews, whether I know the writer, or not. I find almost all of them to be intelligent, informative, and well worth listening to, even when I disagree with much of what they say.

I've tried many writer's novels after listening to an interview. Sometimes I find writers I love this way, sometimes the writing doesn't interest me at all, but it does no harm to try it.

Manuel Royal
07-05-2015, 10:58 PM
I think I may first have become aware of Sarah Vowell through her appearances on The Daily Show; that led me to getting some of her books. Good stuff.

Reading an interview with Lee Child had the opposite effect, and turned me off his work.

oceansoul
07-06-2015, 01:17 PM
I've never really been hooked into reading a new author by their interviews. However, if I'm already interested in reading the book, and have seen the blurb, a really good interview might encourage me to actually buy it. Similarly, if I've read one title by an author, and I'm searching them out -- a good interview might make me aware of another book or realise I need to be following everything they write.

Jamesaritchie
07-06-2015, 07:33 PM
I've never lost interest in a writer's work because of an interview. The writer and the book are not the same thing, and if I didn't read a book because of something the writer said, I'd either never read any writer, or I'd make sure to plug my ears and never listen to any writer.

Pagey's_Girl
07-11-2015, 08:10 PM
This was how I discovered Stephen Donaldson, years ago. He did an interview in People, of all magazines, about the time White Gold Wielder was released. I tracked down Lord Foul's Bane and was hooked. Yeah, I don't know what my friends were reading at fourteen, but that was what I was into.

cmi0616
08-01-2015, 06:45 AM
I'm surprised nobody else has mentioned David Foster Wallace. I was convinced to finally read him after watching his famous interview on a German TV station (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkxUY0kxH80).

Filigree
08-01-2015, 07:35 PM
I've only walked away from authors twice after seeing/reading them in interviews. Both times, I was not terribly thrilled with their work in the first place. I *have* reached new appreciation for authors whose writing I didn't like, but found them to be amazing people in person.

Liosse de Velishaf
08-01-2015, 09:00 PM
I mean, if we expand to non-prose fiction, then yes, I've had this experience many times. Maybe not in audio/video interviews.

CrastersBabies
08-03-2015, 02:42 AM
I had kind of the opposite reaction once?

Not that I found the author too awesome to read -- rather that the author, Sam Sykes, was UNBELIEVABLY entertaining and smart in person (seriously, he's hilarious), but every time I try to read one of his books, I can't get into it.

And that seems like such a shame, because the guy's got a wicked sense of humour, is completely gonzo-in-a-good-way, and manages to say very clever things while keeping you entertained. I'm sure he's a great writer, but there's something about his writing style that isn't my cup of tea.

Yeah, I had the same experience with Sam Sykes, interestingly enough.

Think he's amazingly funny on panels.

greendragon
08-19-2015, 11:50 PM
Jim Butcher. I attended a panel of his at Dragoncon, and (admittedly, with the recommendations of several friends) picked up his books and are enjoying them. I think I'm on his seventh Dresden book now? Eighth? Whichever White Knight is.

Tedium
09-08-2015, 12:24 PM
David Foster Wallace and Larry Brown. I watched interviews before I read anything they wrote. Glad it turned out that I really like their writing.