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JohnnyGottaKeyboard
05-15-2015, 08:24 AM
So, I actually played Team Tennis in high school, but realized when I went to write about it, that I did not know the answer to this question:

If you are recounting the score, how do you record the score of an individual game?

For instance, a set can be recorded as 6-4. Player A won 6 games, Player B, 4. Player A thus won the set. But say you want to document the way the games were won? Since a game of Tennis isn't scored on straight points (1, 2, 3, 4...) how do you describe it? Say Player A (serving) won a game but Player B scored 2 points? Do you document that as "Game/30"? That strikes me as clumsy, but is straightforward enough.

Ah-ha, but now consider: What if they played to Deuce, Player A won the next point, then Player B won a point, putting them back at Deuce, then Player B won another point, but then Player A won the next point, putting them to Deuce a third time, then player A went on to win the next two points winning the game. Whew! How on Earth is that recorded?
The actual point tally would be Player A: 7, Player B: 5, but Tennis doesn't have equivalents for "7" or "5".

Help!

blacbird
05-15-2015, 09:42 AM
Tennis doesn't have equivalents for "7" or "5".

Actually, tennis does. Not unusual at all. With the tiebreaker system, in operation in all major tournaments except Wimbledon, tiebreaker scores of 7-6 are common, and 7-5 set scores likewise. Two or three years ago, at Wimbledon, a marathon match between John Isner of the USA and a French player whose name escapes me at the moment, went on for a record into the sixties for scoring.

caw

blacbird
05-15-2015, 09:44 AM
Tennis doesn't have equivalents for "7" or "5".

Actually, tennis does. Not unusual at all. With the tiebreaker system, in operation in all major tournaments except for fifth sets at Wimbledon, tiebreaker scores of 7-6 are common, and 7-5 set scores likewise. Two or three years ago, at Wimbledon, a marathon match between John Isner of the USA and a French player (Mahut), went on for a record for scoring. The final went to Isner 6-4, 3-6, 6-7, 7-6, 70-68. The final set was played over three days, with no service breaks until the end.

caw

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
05-15-2015, 11:38 AM
Thanks, but again you are recording the set scores. I'm interested in learning how one records the individual game scores.

That's what I meant by "Tennis doesn't have equivalents for "7" or "5"." In an individual game the first point is 15, the second is 30, and the third is 40. After that the game either moves to Deuce or one of the players wins. Therefore there are no "words" to indicate any point beyond the third.

ajaye
05-15-2015, 01:49 PM
I don't know if any such scoring system exists but here's my proposal. As you say, there's no winning game score or number as such so I'd term it 'game' and show it like this (say for a 6-1 set where the winner lost the first game only) -
30-G, G-15, G-30, G-0, G-30, G-15, G-40(4). I'd use brackets to show the number of deuces, as they do when televising.
Must say I don't know why there would be a need to show such detail.

eyeblink
05-15-2015, 02:10 PM
Actually, tennis does. Not unusual at all. With the tiebreaker system, in operation in all major tournaments except for fifth sets at Wimbledon, tiebreaker scores of 7-6 are common, and 7-5 set scores likewise. Two or three years ago, at Wimbledon, a marathon match between John Isner of the USA and a French player (Mahut), went on for a record for scoring. The final went to Isner 6-4, 3-6, 6-7, 7-6, 70-68. The final set was played over three days, with no service breaks until the end.

caw

And except third sets in women's and mixed doubles games. The other Grand Slams do the same. Actually the Isner/Mahut match was in 2010.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
05-15-2015, 04:37 PM
Must say I don't know why there would be a need to show such detail.It's kind of a character quirk. A very boastful man who is bragging about his triumphs. He's put it in a letter to his daughter (which subsequently gets made public), so I've devised my own system (very similar to yours). I just wanted to use the proper way if it existed. Like I said, I played tennis on my school team, and never came across a printed set of scores (for individuals games) and wondered if there was one.

Complicating my story is that the man's opponent eventually tells a very different story of their tennis match...So some details are required to show where the two men's stories disagree.

Bing Z
05-15-2015, 05:12 PM
It's kind of a character quirk. A very boastful man who is bragging about his triumphs. He's put it in a letter to his daughter (which subsequently gets made public), so I've devised my own system (very similar to yours). I just wanted to use the proper way if it existed. Like I said, I played tennis on my school team, and never came across a printed set of scores (for individuals games) and wondered if there was one.

On a sports site you may read something like "Isner lost a tight match against Dimitrov 7-6(9), 6-7(21), 6-7(13), 7-6(10), 6-7(102)." People don't talk like that IRL (or in a novel.) When asked by a friend, Isner may just say something like, "Lost in five, all tiebreaks." Then he may elaborate when such friend wants more details (and offers lotz drinks). If Isner lost to Djokovic with a score of 6-2, 6-3, he would tell his drinking buddy something like, "Lost, two and three."

Nobody cares about the points won in a game (after a set is won) unless the scores are very notable, like a golden set (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_set). Another thing that can be bragged about is "bagel" which is a 6-0 set. Double bagel is 6-0 6-0 which is a humiliation to the loser. Triple bagel is 6-0 6-0 6-0 in grand slams/Davis Cup/Olympic matches (happened less than 10 times since 1980.)

In your example, let's assume the daughter knows squat about tennis, the braggy dad might write "lost/won in three tight matches that lasted 32 hours." He could go into tiebreaks but what good if the daughter doesn't know tennis? OTOH if the daughter knows tennis, he could simply write the score, of if it is something big, she probably should be following.


Complicating my story is that the man's opponent eventually tells a very different story of their tennis match...So some details are required to show where the two men's stories disagree.

King Neptune
05-15-2015, 05:34 PM
Is this what you were looking for?
http://www.cis.umassd.edu/~hxu/alink/UICTennis/score.html

ajaye
05-15-2015, 06:01 PM
It's kind of a character quirk. A very boastful man who is bragging about his triumphs. He's put it in a letter to his daughter (which subsequently gets made public), so I've devised my own system (very similar to yours). I just wanted to use the proper way if it existed. Like I said, I played tennis on my school team, and never came across a printed set of scores (for individuals games) and wondered if there was one.

Complicating my story is that the man's opponent eventually tells a very different story of their tennis match...So some details are required to show where the two men's stories disagree.

Yes I can picture such a letter, written by a pedantic and exasperating bore :) But as a reader I would totally skip those lines and take nothing from them except that the writer is a pedantic and exasperating bore :) I think it can work to that end, but I wouldn't expect the reader to care about or glean anything from such a scoreline.When the opponent comes into the story to disagree I would have him talk normal tennis lingo as suggested by Bing, I wouldn't belabour the pedantry.

Cath
05-15-2015, 07:22 PM
Please focus on answering the question, not speculating on the purpose or impact.

JohnnyGottaKeyboard
05-16-2015, 03:21 AM
So the short answer is: No, as far as we all know, no method for recording individual game scores for posterity exists. Whew. In that case, I'll stick with my homemade method.

Yes I can picture such a letter, written by a pedantic and exasperating bore :) But as a reader I would totally skip those lines and take nothing from them except that the writer is a pedantic and exasperating bore :) I think it can work to that end, but I wouldn't expect the reader to care about or glean anything from such a scoreline.When the opponent comes into the story to disagree I would have him talk normal tennis lingo as suggested by Bing, I wouldn't belabour the pedantry.Except there's really not much to skip. He actually inserts a basic table listing server, winner, score for each game. Simpler than a golf scorecard. As such, I assume most readers would treat it as an illustration and merely glance at it and move on. But I still need to do it the right way if a "right way" exists!

It's a story about a middle aged man who (mostly through coincidence, it turns out) believes he experiences the perfect day. This leads him to decide to write a self-help book. The letter to his daughter justifying his decision is about the whole day. The tennis match is just a small part of it (although he is very excited by it).

Thanks again to everyone for taking the time to respond!

ajaye
05-16-2015, 03:53 AM
Sorry, didn't mean to offend anyone with my last comment but can see I could have.