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Iforgotthis
04-09-2015, 07:37 PM
Hello,
I don't know if this is the right place for this, sorry if it's not.
Secondly, I think I've invented two (similar, but with different meanings) words, but I'm not sure if there's already a word for it and I was wondering if anyone could help.

The first word is: Giance - extreme largeness in size or political/social/cultural influence.

e.g. the man who holds the position of pope has giance.

The second word is: Giancey - extreme largeness in size and political/social/cultural influence.

e.g. the position of pope holds giancey.

With the term 'giancey' I don't mean actual size (unlike with giance), but perceived size, if that makes sense. I mean it in reference to ideas, theories, or organizations that aren't physical (government regimes or religions for example).
I don't know if these words are necessary, or if the definitions already have words to them. Does anyone know?
The context I want to use the words in are as follows:

'The man gazed, dumbfounded, at the giance of the statue.'

'The man had, for as long as he could remember, felt the giancey of the communist party over him.'

Thanks for your time! :)

dawinsor
04-09-2015, 07:58 PM
Neither word shows up on dictionary.com.

Jamesaritchie
04-09-2015, 08:07 PM
I don't think they're words, but why do you need them, and how will readers know what they mean?

Chase
04-09-2015, 08:09 PM
Giance or Giancey. Are these already words?

Not according to WordWeb, Merriam-Webster, or American Heritage.

However, you wouldn't be the first author to make up words to fit your novel. All you need to do is introduce and explain it.

Another word hint: pope is not capitalized in "The man who holds the position of Pope has giance." It's an error of giancetic proportions. :D

Iforgotthis
04-09-2015, 08:21 PM
Not according to WordWeb, Merriam-Webster, or American Heritage.

However, you wouldn't be the first author to make up words to fit your novel. All you need to do is introduce and explain it.

Another word hint: pope is not capitalized in "The man who holds the position of Pope has giance." It's an error of giancetic proportions. :D

That's surprising, I thought it would be, with it being an important religious role and that... thank you for letting me know!
I plan on putting the definitions at the very front of the book, like a foreword. Would this work or should it be embodied in the text?

veinglory
04-09-2015, 08:55 PM
It is far easier and more pleasant to read if the words are just introduced in a way that makes their meaning obvious.

Chase
04-09-2015, 09:20 PM
It is far easier and more pleasant to read if the words are just introduced in a way that makes their meaning obvious.

I thoroughly agree.


That's surprising, I thought it would be, with it being an important religious role . . .

You're not alone, but capitalization has nothing to do with honor, importance, or piety. It's for proper nouns--names, place names, and titles attached to names. For instance, Francis . . . Rome, Italy . . . Pope Francis.

Common nouns are in lower case: the man . . . the city and the country . . . the pope.

King Neptune
04-09-2015, 10:19 PM
That's surprising, I thought it would be, with it being an important religious role and that... thank you for letting me know!
I plan on putting the definitions at the very front of the book, like a foreword. Would this work or should it be embodied in the text?

If you use the title in place of a name, then the capital is correct. The same is true for any job title or term used in place of a person's actual name: the Professor, the Captain, etc.

King Neptune
04-09-2015, 10:54 PM
The above is true in direct address: "Great job, Captain."



The above is not true.

Correct would read: The student was called to the professor's office. (Both student and professor are common nouns.)

Correct would read: The captain told the lieutenant, the lieutenant told the sergeant, and the sergeant told me. (In this case, captain, lieutenant, and sergeant are common nouns.)

I won't go into it agtain, but when a job tiotle is used in place of a name, then is should be capitalized. We went through this before, and eventually even you agreed that the Captain and the Professor on "Gilligan's Island" should be capitalized. Those are just two examples of titles being used in place of names thereby becoming nicknames. If you wish to use a different rule, then don't let me stop you.

evilrooster
04-10-2015, 12:05 AM
Please don't make me do something cruel to get the two of you to stop squabbling.

Wait, it's been a long week. Go ahead. Test my patience. I'm sure it'll be interesting for all of us.

King Neptune
04-10-2015, 12:22 AM
Please don't make me do something cruel to get the two of you to stop squabbling.

Wait, it's been a long week. Go ahead. Test my patience. I'm sure it'll be interesting for all of us.

Thank you, but I refused to squabble.

evilrooster
04-10-2015, 12:31 AM
Thank you, but I refused to squabble.

That's not what it looks like from here. Tread more carefully next time.

DavidMivshek
04-15-2015, 02:31 AM
Most I found:


Giance (from the name Xian, old orthography Jiam, derived of Latin Iulianus + suffix -ici-), with no Spanish equivalent