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dascmom
03-10-2015, 08:39 PM
Hi- I have a couple of questions about teen alcohol addiction.

If a teen gets alcohol poisoning and is brought by parents to the hospital for treatment, does that necessitate that a police report is filed and subsequent court involvement?

If a teen does not end up in the hospital, but the family decides to pull him out of school to send him to a residential rehab out of state does this necessitate court involvement?

Thanks in advance. (I do not want the courts to be involved here.)

Cath
03-10-2015, 08:41 PM
What's the location? I suspect the laws are different depending on location (assuming this is US).

dascmom
03-10-2015, 08:45 PM
The boy lives in New Hampshire. Residential rehab was in Florida.

jclarkdawe
03-10-2015, 10:25 PM
No report is required from the hospital.

No report is required if the boy is pulled from school, providing the school is aware of his status. This is assuming the boy is consenting to the rehab.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

dascmom
03-11-2015, 09:12 AM
Thank you!! This is very helpful!!

cornflake
03-11-2015, 09:21 AM
Hi- I have a couple of questions about teen alcohol addiction.

If a teen gets alcohol poisoning and is brought by parents to the hospital for treatment, does that necessitate that a police report is filed and subsequent court involvement?

A police report and court involvement for what? I'm not sure what you're thinking would trigger that - so I dunno exactly how to answer. If he says someone held him down and poured booze down his throat at a frat hazing and they want the cops called, then obviously they're making a criminal complaint.

If a teen does not end up in the hospital, but the family decides to pull him out of school to send him to a residential rehab out of state does this necessitate court involvement?

Again, I feel like you're skipping a lot of stuff. Rehab for what? Is he supposed to be an alcoholic? What would the court be involved with here? If he's under 16, in most states, and just ditches out of school for longer than is allowed to pass or be truant, then he'll fail or could have a truancy issue?

Thanks in advance. (I do not want the courts to be involved here.)

What is it you want to happen? Working backwards is often easier.

stephsco
03-22-2015, 04:02 AM
Hi everyone. Since this subject line was already here, I figured I would add onto it' ' related topic, new questions.

I am writing a YA set in Oregon (Portland at large), and have looked up various sites already on state-specific drunk driving laws and penalties, but am still coming up a little short on some details.

Wondering if anyone has expertise on driving violations for teens to round out my research; things such as timelines from violation to court hearing, type of hearing, additional fallout I might be overlooking. It could either be general knowledge about violations, or knowledge about Oregon (I've visited and have a few friends in the area, though writers often have more specific details!)

In my story a 15-year-old with provisional license (permit) confesses to driving her drunk sister home from a party. She crashes the car resulting in minor injuries, totaled car. In her mind, she's getting her sister out safe, even though she's not allowed to drive on her own w/o a guardian and certainly not driving another teen who is violating the law by underage drinking. I have her getting sentenced with community service and suspension of driving privileges for either 6 months to a year, meaning she can't get her license until then. Plus fines.

The twist in the story is that the confession is actually a lie; the 15-yr-old is covering for her 18-yr-old sister who actually DID drive drunk. The 18yo has a previous traffic violation, and is heading toward alcoholism; her younger sister aims to "protect" her from a harsh sentence (the story focuses a bit on their struggling relationship as sisters). The penalties from what I can find is suspension of license for a year plus fines plus mandatory drug counseling.

I can provide more story detail if needed.

Thanks in advance!

cornflake
03-22-2015, 04:11 AM
Hi everyone. Since this subject line was already here, I figured I would add onto it' ' related topic, new questions.

I am writing a YA set in Oregon (Portland at large), and have looked up various sites already on state-specific drunk driving laws and penalties, but am still coming up a little short on some details.

Wondering if anyone has expertise on driving violations for teens to round out my research; things such as timelines from violation to court hearing, type of hearing, additional fallout I might be overlooking. It could either be general knowledge about violations, or knowledge about Oregon (I've visited and have a few friends in the area, though writers often have more specific details!)

In my story a 15-year-old with provisional license (permit) confesses to driving her drunk sister home from a party. She crashes the car resulting in minor injuries, totaled car. In her mind, she's getting her sister out safe, even though she's not allowed to drive on her own w/o a guardian and certainly not driving another teen who is violating the law by underage drinking. I have her getting sentenced with community service and suspension of driving privileges for either 6 months to a year, meaning she can't get her license until then. Plus fines.

The twist in the story is that the confession is actually a lie; the 15-yr-old is covering for her 18-yr-old sister who actually DID drive drunk. The 18yo has a previous traffic violation, and is heading toward alcoholism; her younger sister aims to "protect" her from a harsh sentence (the story focuses a bit on their struggling relationship as sisters). The penalties from what I can find is suspension of license for a year plus fines plus mandatory drug counseling.

I can provide more story detail if needed.

Thanks in advance!

I think you'd be better off with a new thread, as this isn't really at all the same topic. Even if stuff seems to relate, it's easier to have separate topics for specific stuff usually, so that people can search and find a specific answer, and so that people who have knowledge can answer.

You can ask a mod to move this to its own thread, rather than double posting. Just check at the bottom to see the section mods and msg one to ask.

As to the question, I'm not in Oregon, so I can't answer too specifically, but time to hearings anyplace will depend on the specific locale and how backed up they are there, unless you're talking about a bail hearing or arraignment, those should be very quick anyplace. A kid that age is likely family court and those run on different schedules a lot of places though.

Your MC is a dumbass tho. :)

stephsco
03-22-2015, 04:25 AM
Ack; thank you. I was a frequent poster at a very large message forum where users would get picky about creating new topics. I'll move this to a new topic!

Thanks for the insight. I used to work (briefly) with family court though with foster care and adoption.

And yes; MC made a dumb decision. Bad choices = (hopefully!) good stories