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CWHs2
02-06-2015, 10:39 PM
Need help figuring out how to fill up a pool using a water delivery service. If I was to hire a water hauler/truck to deliver water, where exactly do they get the water? Do they buy it? From who/where?

Lauram6123
02-06-2015, 10:52 PM
Need help figuring out how to fill up a pool using a water delivery service. If I was to hire a water hauler/truck to deliver water, where exactly do they get the water? Do they buy it? From who/where?

This site looks like it might be of some help.

http://www.daviswaterservice.com/

jclarkdawe
02-06-2015, 11:50 PM
It depends. In an urban area, most likely they'll tap into fire hydrants. In a more rural area, they might pump from a lake or pond. If they're tapping a hydrant, then they pay the water authority for the load. Most water carriers want to limit the trucking distance of the load. Price for the water delivery is based in part upon the cost of the water that is being delivered. Most pool fills will require multiple trips.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

badwolf.usmc
02-06-2015, 11:53 PM
Need help figuring out how to fill up a pool using a water delivery service. If I was to hire a water hauler/truck to deliver water, where exactly do they get the water? Do they buy it? From who/where?

Some towns allow the fire department to fill pools from hydrants. How you fill a pool depends on where you live, but I'm sure that the bulk water delivery service would work with the city utilities in some way since you want clean water to fill pools.

Bolero
02-07-2015, 12:58 AM
Pure curiosity - do fire departments suck water from private pools in an emergency
a) In general
b) If filled from a hydrant?

jclarkdawe
02-07-2015, 02:59 AM
Rural departments that have no hydrant system will sometimes use a pool. It's about 20,000 gallons of water that if it's in the right position can be very helpful. Fire trucks in rural service tend to carry a 1,000 gallons of water, so 20,000 gallons is a good amount of water. Most pools are not located in a place where a fire engine can get to easily.

Water sources for rural work can be pretty bad. Muddy water you wouldn't want to swim in is not a problem. With a dry hydrant system, fish get trapped in the system, grow up so they can't get out, and get sucked into the pump. Algae and plant life can get sucked in without a problem. Pool water, and I don't care where it's from, is actually going to be a pretty good source of water.

The main problem is getting the engine close enough. Usually pools are on the back side of a house, and we'll set up without ever noticing the pool. Even if we see it, we've got to drive a truck weighing 30,000+ pounds to it, and we don't want to stick the truck in mud.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Drachen Jager
02-07-2015, 09:09 AM
Pure curiosity - do fire departments suck water from private pools in an emergency
a) In general
b) If filled from a hydrant?

Here's a video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPIboTdIYyQ

You're probably thinking of trucks though.

In rural areas they bring their own water. In an emergency, they would refill the tanker truck from any available source, whatever's closest.

CWHs2
02-10-2015, 02:15 AM
Thank you all for your helpful comments.

Cuneiform
02-18-2015, 01:18 AM
Usually you would ask a road construction company that has the water trucks for dust control and they have the permit to tap into the nearest fire hydrant or pump it out of a river. Most people turn the water bib on and don't forget ! I've seen whole backyards full and pouring out the walkway around the house. One customer was watering brand new gunite and jetsetted off to the islands for a week. oops