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daisywilbur
01-07-2015, 08:06 PM
Hello,

I'm so confused right now. I found an agent, we worked hard together to get my book all polished, she sent out a round of pitches around Thanksgiving, and we've been waiting for feedback. She has another round of pitches ready to go this week or next.

Last night, she told me she's leaving agenting. I don't know the whole story, but it sounds like a personal decision rather than a true desire to leave the business. Regardless, her motivation doesn't change how this is affecting me.

Anyway, she wants to keep me on until we either make a sale for this manuscript or decide to pack 'er in. She gave a tentative deadline of March/April to make a final decision.

Am I stupid to stick with her until then? Do I even WANT her to make a sale for me when I know she won't be around afterwards? How will a new agent react to this?

The fact is, my manuscript is being considered by a fair number of editors right now, and the idea of pulling it from consideration to search for a new agent makes me nauseous. BUT, is not pulling it and sticking with this agent for the next few months a super dumbass move? If it doesn't sell, it's easier to part ways. My mind keeps turning over the hypothetical sale and what would come after for me.

Someone help!??! Words of wisdom and advice??

Perks
01-07-2015, 08:22 PM
Crap. Is she offering to help you transition to another agent?

daisywilbur
01-07-2015, 08:32 PM
Not really. She sorta kinda mentioned it, but nothing firm.

Perks
01-07-2015, 08:38 PM
See that would be a big problem for me. If the manuscript sells, she'll have to waive off any subsequent rights that could sell - foreign print rights, film or television rights, special editions, etc. - because she won't be around to negotiate and manage those things. If you don't have that very specifically spelled out, she'll be due her 15% (or whatever her cut is) and you won't have the support expected for that payment.

Also, my agent has been invaluable in the process. I have relied on her throughout the publication process.

I do understand your reluctance to pull the submissions. I think you have to have a frank talk with her about what her expectations are where rights are concerned and how she plans to handle the specifics of what would happen if the manuscript sells on this round of submissions.

Did you have any other offers of representation or nibbles of interest before you signed with her?

Old Hack
01-07-2015, 09:11 PM
If she's at an agency, are there other agents there who would consider taking your book on?

If not, can she recommend you to anyone else?

As has already been said, if she abandons your book after making just one sale for it, she's not doing her job. And you are very unlikely to find another agent willing to take the same book on for just subsidiary rights sales.

Sage
01-07-2015, 09:20 PM
It's a very tricky situation, since she's already pitched the book to those editors. If you leave her for another agent, what happens with those pitches that are out there? Do they stay out there or does she have to pull them? It's unfortunate because either way, there are fewer editors a future agent can pitch to, which makes it harder to get an agent with this book.

If she does sell the book, you probably won't be able to get another agent until you have another book ready. The good news is that the sale of this book will probably help with getting a new agent, but you won't have anyone to represent you for other rights for this book in the meantime.

ElaineA
01-07-2015, 09:56 PM
I think you have to have a frank talk with her about what her expectations are where rights are concerned and how she plans to handle the specifics of what would happen if the manuscript sells on this round of submissions.


This. I think that we, as writers, default to looking at agents as "the boss" in the relationship. It's natural. They (generally) know the business side of things better than we do. But really, it's an equal relationship, and we can't be timid about these sorts of conversations. She stands to earn 15% off your work if it gets picked up. The very least she can do is fully inform you of her vision as the process moves forward.

Good luck. It's an unfortunate position, for sure.

Sage
01-07-2015, 09:57 PM
No matter what, make sure you get a list of those editors. And don't let her sub anymore.

daisywilbur
01-07-2015, 11:21 PM
Thanks, everyone. I'm still spinning from the news, but will obviously have to get it together and have that discussion with her. I feel completely in the dark about the business end of things... I have no idea how the author-agent relationship works after a sale.

But I should probably go with my gut... and my gut is telling me that her selling my work at this point is probably not good for me.

I wonder what will happen to those submissions?

:cry:

millymollymo
01-07-2015, 11:29 PM
Do you know where she's subbed to already? If not ask her for a list if you decide to go your own way - then at least you can forwarn the next agent you sign with.
Good luck, and I hope the bad news turns out to be the good news you didn't know you needed.

Perks
01-07-2015, 11:36 PM
Thanks, everyone. I'm still spinning from the news, but will obviously have to get it together and have that discussion with her. I feel completely in the dark about the business end of things... I have no idea how the author-agent relationship works after a sale.

But I should probably go with my gut... and my gut is telling me that her selling my work at this point is probably not good for me.

I wonder what will happen to those submissions?

:cry:

Unfortunately, you'll need to either pull those submissions or make sure that your current agent releases all contractual rights, should the current round of submissions result in a sale. See, as the agent on record, she's entitled to whatever the agreed upon percentage of works sold under her efforts, unless she relinquishes that claim. Do you have any idea how many editors have the manuscript from her at the moment? (And definitely tell her not to sub it any more until you figure this out.)

Hang in there. I switched agents in the middle of submissions with my first novel and it worked out just fine. All is not lost. Just don't let her sub it anymore - first order of business! Then get a list of who she's subbed to. This will make all the difference in how to go forward with things.

daisywilbur
01-07-2015, 11:52 PM
Unfortunately, you'll need to either pull those submissions or make sure that your current agent releases all contractual rights, should the current round of submissions result in a sale. See, as the agent on record, she's entitled to whatever the agreed upon percentage of works sold under her efforts, unless she relinquishes that claim.

OK, so this is the kind of thing that makes me nervous. I don't know nearly enough about the business side of things to know what this even means. It doesn't seem right that a year or two from now she would be collecting income from a sale when we no longer have a relationship. I understand getting a portion of the initial advance or something, but indefinitely? Which is how the contract reads to me. Which would be fine if we were still working together...

It's out with 16 editors right now, after that first submission round of 18 she sent out. I don't know if that's a lot. It seemed like it to me.

Still :cry:

Old Hack
01-07-2015, 11:57 PM
Agents typically are paid their commission on all the earnings from the deals they make. So if your agent sells this book she'll get a percentage of the advance, and then a percentage of all the royalties the book earns once that advance is earned out.

If the publisher demands all rights to the book and then sells any of those rights on, she will also be paid her percentage of all monies you are paid from those deals.

daisywilbur
01-07-2015, 11:58 PM
Did you have any other offers of representation or nibbles of interest before you signed with her?

I had an offer from a small press, but for another story. We decided to work on this manuscript because it's stronger. I never queried this particular work, so no, I have no gauge for other interest.

The thing is, she's letting most, if not all, of her other clients go. To me, this means she's confident it will sell. I'm not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing anymore.

Perks
01-08-2015, 12:03 AM
The thing is, she's letting most, if not all, of her other clients go. To me, this means she's confident it will sell. I'm not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing anymore.

If she's quitting the business imminently, I can't see how it could work out to a good thing. 18 submissions is kind of a lot.

Keep us posted on the talks you have with her and get stuff in writing.

Sage
01-08-2015, 12:27 AM
It's 18 + 16, if I'm reading this right, which is really a lot. And...kinda makes me question how good she is at targeting the right editors.

Old Hack
01-08-2015, 12:34 AM
Would you mind letting us know who this agent is? If you'd rather not say in public you're welcome to let me know via PM, in confidence of course.

Perks
01-08-2015, 12:38 AM
It's 18 + 16, if I'm reading this right, which is really a lot. And...kinda makes me question how good she is at targeting the right editors.

And if that's the case, it could be good news if she hit the wrong ones.

daisywilbur
01-08-2015, 12:38 AM
No, it was that she sent out a blitz of 18 pitches and got 17 requests for the manuscript (we've had one rejection so far). So it's still out with 16. It's only gone one round, albeit a big one.

And her push to get these out by Thanksgiving (which was only 7 weeks ago) makes the pessimist in me wonder about her timing, and when she got news the agency was closing. It sounds very much like this was a sudden thing, but I don't know.

I don't mind divulging who the agent is, but I don't know if anything has been formally announced yet. I'll let you know when someone else spills the beans, but I'd hate for another client of hers to find out HERE that this is happening...

Old Hack
01-08-2015, 01:37 AM
Send me a PM; please. I won't tell anyone who it is, but knowing who it is might well colour the advice that I can give you.

I'm getting worried by what you've told us, and I'm concerned that you're in the hands of a dodgy agent.

For the record, I've worked in publishing for (OMG) thirty years, and have written a few books, too. I've seen far too many dodgy agents in that time.

Quickbread
01-08-2015, 02:36 AM
I'm so sorry this is happening to you. What does your contract say about this situation? If the agency is closing its doors, maybe there's some sort of exit from future contractual obligations.

daisywilbur
01-08-2015, 03:10 AM
There's nothing in the contract that says anything about this scenario. It's in effect for 1 year (from last October), but can be terminated earlier "if all possibilities for selling the work have been exhausted." I suppose the agent leaving and the agency closing effectively apply there, but if she wants to keep me, I might be held to the contract??

I'm getting more upset the longer I think about this. I noticed on QueryTracker that she closed to queries and was not accepting new agents in November... about when we went out on sub.

Moonchild
01-13-2015, 01:50 AM
Oh man, what a horribly frustrating and upsetting situation! I'm so sorry to hear you're going through it! :Hug2:

Others with more knowledge and experience have already weighed in with what seems to me very sound advice and clarifications of what this agent would be entitled to if you decide to stick with her and your book sells.

Given the situation, what appear to be her expectations or assumptions, and the fact that she subbed to so friggin' many pubs in one batch, the whole thing really does give me pause. The way I see it is, she probably thinks your book will sell (which is good) and so, even though she's quitting agenting, she'd like to still have a chance to get a piece of the pie... which is not so good... Also, unfair. I mean... Is she quitting-QUITTING? Or will she continue to handle rights or something on her own? Because, maybe I'm being unfair and/or ignorant/naive, but if she's really getting out of the biz altogether, and will therefore effectively stop being your representative/advocate, I don't see why she should reap any future benefits from work she won't do.

I really think you need to have a very frank discussion with her about this and/or with the head of the agency (unless that's her too!). I don't know about the legal stuff and how binding such a contract would be given the circumstances, but I really do agree with others that you need to get a clear picture of her expectations and what--if anything--does she propose to do for you in the long-term.

tl;dr: I saw an announcement today on Publisher's Lunch, so I have a strong suspicion of who this person might be. If you feel comfortable doing so, I wouldn't mind getting confirmation of her identity via PM (I'm in the middle of querying and I like to keep tabs on agents). If you don't feel comfortable sharing the info, that's cool too.

Best of luck, though! I really am sorry you are going through this crap! :cry:

Jamesaritchie
01-13-2015, 03:06 AM
Agents typically are paid their commission on all the earnings from the deals they make. So if your agent sells this book she'll get a percentage of the advance, and then a percentage of all the royalties the book earns once that advance is earned out.

If the publisher demands all rights to the book and then sells any of those rights on, she will also be paid her percentage of all monies you are paid from those deals.

The publisher can demand whatever it likes, but NO agent worth having will ever give in to such rights. I doubt very much any reputable publisher would demand all rights. I've never known it to happen, and I'd laugh at them if they did. So would my agent.

Jamesaritchie
01-13-2015, 03:07 AM
I'd ask her to pull everything from submission, with an explanation to the editors for why she's doing so.

Toothpaste
01-13-2015, 03:48 AM
Once again I appear on the scene to correct James's assertion. Many publishers these days are asking for world rights and often attempt to get audio and film with the deal. I agree that agents should do whatever they can to retain as many rights as possible, but saying that no reputable publisher would demand all rights is just wrong. The Big Five do it ALL the time.

As for the rest: pull the submissions, find out if she can recommend you to any of her colleagues either in the agency, or elsewhere. And don't panic. I'm on my third agent, and third agency, due to agents quitting and moving. It's frustrating and scary, but it happens to a lot of us, it's very normal. And it'll work out okay. Oh, and btw, my second agency still has all the rights and earns money on the books that my agent sold with them, even though she and I have moved to the third agency together. That's how it works. They did the work for you, they deserve to be paid for it.

Perks
01-13-2015, 04:02 AM
Many publishers these days are asking for world rights and often attempt to get audio and film with the deal. I agree that agents should do whatever they can to retain as many rights as possible, but saying that no reputable publisher would demand all rights is just wrong. The Big Five do it ALL the time.



That's my experience, too. Although, I'm wondering if the sticking point is on the word "demand". They will certainly look to make that initial deal about world rights and the kitchen sink, but that's only where the negotiations start.

Toothpaste
01-13-2015, 05:44 AM
Possibly, though that's not at all how it came across to me. But at the same time I know of Big Five offers where World Rights were demanded and there was absolutely no wiggle room. Now, the agent and author negotiated the advance and had it raised, for sure, but it was world rights or they weren't publishing the book. I assume James would say then to refuse the offer, but not every author is so lucky as to have multiple offers on the table. And as an author who has one book that pretty much has been rejected by everyone, I know that not every book finds a home. It's a gamble.

daisywilbur
01-13-2015, 08:38 AM
Oh man, what a horribly frustrating and upsetting situation! I'm so sorry to hear you're going through it! :Hug2:

Others with more knowledge and experience have already weighed in with what seems to me very sound advice and clarifications of what this agent would be entitled to if you decide to stick with her and your book sells.

Given the situation, what appear to be her expectations or assumptions, and the fact that she subbed to so friggin' many pubs in one batch, the whole thing really does give me pause. The way I see it is, she probably thinks your book will sell (which is good) and so, even though she's quitting agenting, she'd like to still have a chance to get a piece of the pie... which is not so good... Also, unfair. I mean... Is she quitting-QUITTING? Or will she continue to handle rights or something on her own? Because, maybe I'm being unfair and/or ignorant/naive, but if she's really getting out of the biz altogether, and will therefore effectively stop being your representative/advocate, I don't see why she should reap any future benefits from work she won't do.

I really think you need to have a very frank discussion with her about this and/or with the head of the agency (unless that's her too!). I don't know about the legal stuff and how binding such a contract would be given the circumstances, but I really do agree with others that you need to get a clear picture of her expectations and what--if anything--does she propose to do for you in the long-term.

tl;dr: I saw an announcement today on Publisher's Lunch, so I have a strong suspicion of who this person might be. If you feel comfortable doing so, I wouldn't mind getting confirmation of her identity via PM (I'm in the middle of querying and I like to keep tabs on agents). If you don't feel comfortable sharing the info, that's cool too.

Best of luck, though! I really am sorry you are going through this crap! :cry:

Hey Moonchild, I'm in Nanaimo! Crazy small world, fellow islander!

Thanks for your encouragement. I feel much better about everything. We've come up with a plan that, should the manuscript sell, they would partner with a co-agent. That way, they would get some benefit for selling the work, but I wouldn't be left high and dry and would have some continuity of care (the social worker in me shows herself!) I get the strong impression that the contract negotiation stage is where a these decisions will get made, but I have some idea of how it would all go down instead of my previous floundering.

I'll keep everyone posted and will write more later, and I'll PM you Moonchild.

Old Hack
01-13-2015, 11:29 AM
Many publishers these days are asking for world rights and often attempt to get audio and film with the deal. I agree that agents should do whatever they can to retain as many rights as possible, but saying that no reputable publisher would demand all rights is just wrong. The Big Five do it ALL the time.


That's my experience, too. Although, I'm wondering if the sticking point is on the word "demand". They will certainly look to make that initial deal about world rights and the kitchen sink, but that's only where the negotiations start.

Yes, and yes.


We've come up with a plan that, should the manuscript sell, they would partner with a co-agent. That way, they would get some benefit for selling the work, but I wouldn't be left high and dry and would have some continuity of care (the social worker in me shows herself!) I get the strong impression that the contract negotiation stage is where a these decisions will get made, but I have some idea of how it would all go down instead of my previous floundering.

What do you mean by this, exactly?

I'm concerned that you'll end up paying double-commission on any sales which are made, but you'll not have an agent who is hugely motivated to sell your books--so you'll have the worst of both worlds.

I'm not convinced that this is a good solution for you, but I can see how it would work for the agent.

Protect yourself, please.

Cathy C
01-13-2015, 03:55 PM
In addition to concerns that others have stated, if the AGENCY is the one closing, it's going to be tough to even proceed with a contract with a publisher because there's no entity remaining to send checks to. An agent isn't an agency, nor vice versa. They're not interchangeable. So you would, in effect, have to sign a new deal with your agent as a sole proprietor in order for checks to go to him/her. I would strongly suggest that you not do that, because it will be difficult to work with a new agent. Now, if the agency is remaining and the agent is just leaving, then you're still a client of the agency and could remain with them with a different agent.

ElaineA
01-13-2015, 08:03 PM
I'm not convinced that this is a good solution for you, but I can see how it would work for the agent.

Protect yourself, please.

Looks like Janet Reid agrees with OH here. She took this quandry up on her blog today (http://jetreidliterary.blogspot.com/2015/01/query-question-my-agent-is-quitting-but.html).

daisywilbur
01-13-2015, 08:27 PM
Looks like Janet Reid agrees with OH here. She took this quandry up on her blog today (http://jetreidliterary.blogspot.com/2015/01/query-question-my-agent-is-quitting-but.html).

Yep, that's me... I feel famous now! ;) Janet was oh so nice about it, even emailing back and forth with me a couple times to get more information.

The situation as I left it with my agent is with the assurance they would see the project through and not leave me high and dry. There are two options, should the work sell:

- There are two parts to the agency: a literary consultation side and an agenting side. The agenting side is closing, but the agency head is keeping a select group of her long-time clients. Though my agent won't be around, this agency head would have the ability to handle royalties and answer questions if they come up. So if we do it this way, it's the same as being transferred to another agent.

- Or (my preferred option), my agent would pair up with another agent to collaborate. She would negotiate the contract and handle the advance, and the co-agent would handle royalties and anything that comes up with the project after. They would work out a percentage split for their commission that wouldn't affect me.

I actually thought option 2 was an OK way of making the best out of this situation. The new agent will have some financial incentive for working on the project, will be there from the beginning, and I'll have my support throughout the process. The details of their work split would be worked out at the contract stage.

Totally not ideal, I know. But adequate?

The idea of pulling those submissions makes me ill...

mayqueen
01-13-2015, 08:40 PM
I'm not sure if this helps you or if it muddies up a difficult decision more, but other agents are weighing in on Twitter in response to Janet Reid's tweet about the post (https://twitter.com/Janet_Reid/status/555027871576891392). It seems like a difficult decisions, and I wish you the best!

Perks
01-13-2015, 09:02 PM
I guess one big consideration for option 2 is who the co-agent turns out to be. If it's an agent of comparable experience and reputation and they work out a split on the commission that doesn't make a difference to your bottom line, then groovy.

If it's an inexperienced agent or an agent with a lesser track record than the one you're contracted with, then I'd have a problem with that.

daisywilbur
01-13-2015, 09:03 PM
I'm not sure if this helps you or if it muddies up a difficult decision more, but other agents are weighing in on Twitter in response to Janet Reid's tweet about the post (https://twitter.com/Janet_Reid/status/555027871576891392). It seems like a difficult decisions, and I wish you the best!

Thanks, Mayqueen. I suppose it's nice to see some backup to her response.

I just wish it wasn't such a mess. To chase a dream so long, finally think I'm getting somewhere, and then have this happen to take me the long way back to the start line...

Old Hack
01-13-2015, 11:14 PM
Listen to the wondrous Ms Reid. She talks sense.

I know it's hard, but it will be the best thing in the long run.

Quickbread
01-13-2015, 11:35 PM
Daisy, I agree with Ms. Reid and OH, too. It doesn't seem like your agent is doing you any favors with a co-agent. Why won't she just let go of the manuscript and give you some referrals so you can start fresh and clean? She must know how complicated things could get under a split arrangement, as well as how unsupported you could potentially find yourself at a time when you really need an agent who can talk you down from the ledge because they believe in you 100%.

Who would the co-agent be (assuming your agent is able to find someone willing). Will your agent be able to find a person who loves your work equally deeply and who will work with you equally well? Or is the new agent going to be agreeing to this to do as a grudging favor for a friend or colleague? You might never know, except that the co-agent might not have the proper level of enthusiasm for working with you if they're only in it as a favor or for a few percent in commissions. That's not at all the same thing as finding an agent who's so passionate about your work that they're dying to represent it.

Please think about this carefully and thoroughly consider what is best for your career, your stress level, your need for a support, everything that can happen on the road to publication and beyond, etc. And also consider carefully what your agent's motives are.

Jo Zebedee
01-15-2015, 02:35 AM
I can't help, but I'm finding the thread useful having found myself agentless this week during the submissions phase. In my case, it's amicable, is being sorted professionally, and to do with the range I write, but it's all pretty disconcerting. Hugs to you, I hope it works out for you.

daisywilbur
01-17-2015, 09:59 PM
So my agent and I have parted ways, the submissions have been pulled, and I'm querying again.

I have no desire to run through the long story, but the short version could be taken as a cautionary tale for others.

About an hour after she read the Janet Reid blog post, she released me from all contractual obligations. Though I thought I'd kept my question to Janet very respectful and totally anonymous, my agent was pissed off about it enough to end the discussions we were having.

So, if you have a specific question about the agenting business, know that posting them public places like blogs, or even this forum, can bite you.

But I know this is completely for the best. I obviously don't do well with such a high level of uncertainty, and need to work with someone who can communicate fully.

...It just may take me awhile to emerge from the rubble.

Sage
01-17-2015, 10:21 PM
Reading your part of JR's blog post, you were definitely respectful. I mean, you call her "wonderful." But I could understand her feeling attacked by the publishing world in general after all the tweets and discussion about it, even though she's not mentioned by name.

I'm sorry that this is how it went down and she's mad at you, but this is probably for the best for your novel. I just hope that you did get the name of those editors you were on submission to before she stopped communicating with you.

daisywilbur
01-17-2015, 10:27 PM
Reading your part of JR's blog post, you were definitely respectful. I mean, you call her "wonderful." But I could understand her feeling attacked by the publishing world in general after all the tweets and discussion about it, even though she's not mentioned by name.

I'm sorry that this is how it went down and she's mad at you, but this is probably for the best for your novel. I just hope that you did get the name of those editors you were on submission to before she stopped communicating with you.

Yes, I do feel terrible about it. I didn't want to hurt anyone, and I definitely wouldn't do it the same way twice. That said, I still don't think I did anything fundamentally wrong. It's funny how both things can be true at the same time.

Perks
01-17-2015, 10:30 PM
Daisy, you didn't do ANYthing wrong. I know this is really unpleasant, but her behavior is completely off base.

We're rooting for you.

Viridian
01-17-2015, 10:43 PM
I don't think you did anything wrong, Daisy. Your question was respectful and you did the right thing, seeking advice from Mrs. Reid.

I read some of the tweets, and I think those are kind of disrespectful towards your ex-agent. Janet Reid herself was very kind and neutral, but some of the others weren't exactly tactful.

So, no, you didn't do anything. It isn't your fault that others have chosen to be disrespectful towards your agent. It's a pity she's chosen to blame you for it.

amergina
01-17-2015, 11:05 PM
Your ex-agent should have let you go on the first place. That would have avoided all of this.

Old Hack
01-17-2015, 11:24 PM
I'm seconding (thirding? fourthing?) the comments which say you behaved well here, and have nothing to feel sorry for.

I do think your agent could have handled this better, and I can't help thinking this is for the best. Onward and upward!

Netz
01-18-2015, 01:12 AM
Sending a :Hug2:your way, Daisy. Your writing has attracted agent interest before, and it'll do so again - stay strong! :)

Putputt
01-18-2015, 06:54 AM
I thought your message to Janet Reid was very respectful and kind. I'm with everyone else. You didn't do anything wrong.

Quickbread
01-18-2015, 01:02 PM
I'm sorry this happened to you, Daisy. But even if the agent reacted angrily toward you, she can only be upset with herself. You did the right thing to seek advice, publicly or otherwise, and you were respectful and professional. I know it's easier said than done, but you've nothing to feel bad about.

Good luck with your manuscript!

Pyekett
01-18-2015, 01:47 PM
Better to have a public blowup and bad feelings now than later, and it looks like you were heading towards having it later, when both you and your book would have suffered more.

I don't think there was a "good" end to this, Daisy. Not an end where everyone felt warm and fuzzy and generous to each other. I think this was going to be messy, and you got it over more quickly and with less fallout for you this way.

The_Ink_Goddess
01-19-2015, 01:21 AM
Better to have a public blowup and bad feelings now than later, and it looks like you were heading towards having it later, when both you and your book would have suffered more.

I don't think there was a "good" end to this, Daisy. Not an end where everyone felt warm and fuzzy and generous to each other. I think this was going to be messy, and you got it over more quickly and with less fallout for you this way.

While this is true, I want to add another voice to the chorus telling you that you didn't blow this up - she did. She is essentially leaving you at the most important moment and trying to make your career harder. I know it's scary - really scary - jumping back into the query trenches, my instinct tells me it's worth it, simply due to how deliberately vague (if not downright disingenuous), she's been.

Moonchild
01-20-2015, 03:50 AM
Just joining in to say you didn't do anything wrong: your question to the Sharkly One was as anonymous as you could have made it, and it was polite and even kindly-worded. That's all commendable at the best of times, so considering the emotional upheaval and confusion you must have been in at the time, you get even more brownie points for your professionalism under duress, far as I'm concerned! :Hug2:

It's not your fault how others may or may have not chimed in with their opinions on Twitter, and it's not their fault how Ms. Agent reacted to the whole thing. It's not like she or her agency was ever singled out by name or any other identifiers. She's probably stressed out and confused by the whole thing (i.e., being pushed into a career change), too, so I do get how she might have been more likely to lash out. But all in all, as much as this is upsetting and hurtful, I agree with everyone else: it's probably for the best. At least in your new queries you can add a sentence about 'having recently parted ways with your agent.' Maybe I'm being naive (or optimistic), but I'd imagine a book that has already attracted an agent's attention will be more likely to get requests? :Shrug:

Either way, best of luck!

ElaineA
01-20-2015, 08:04 PM
Daisy, I'll say again, you've been entirely professional under real duress. While I'm sure it's stressful for the agent facing a career change, I find her response far less professional than yours.

I'm with Pyekett. This is one of those "rip off the band-aid" situations. I strongly suspect you'll come out the better for it. Hang in there. :Hug2:

Lena Hillbrand
01-20-2015, 09:29 PM
I'm so sorry this happened to you. Hopefully you will be laughing about this someday, when you're a bestseller.

You did not go about this the wrong way. You did not release your agent's name, and seeking advice from an impartial professional is the RIGHT thing to do. If you had not asked for advice, you might be stuck in a much worse situation than querying (such as not being able to interest another agent).

Good luck to you! Hang in there.