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slhuang
12-22-2014, 10:34 PM
Hi!

I have a character I want to repeat the word "No" in a variety of different languages -- context is that he's tempted to do something and is cutting himself off by saying, "no, I will not be that person" and basically repeating the word "no" a bunch of times. Speak a non-English language? Help me out! :D

The only specific language that's important for me to include is Tagalog, which I got as "Walang" from Google Translate, but I do not know if that makes sense in this context. :o I'm particularly interested in non-Western languages and obscure dialects just because the places the character has been to learn all these languages are often non-Western off the beaten track, but am happy to get any input. :)

Thanks (and rep points) in advance!

cornflake
12-22-2014, 10:39 PM
Nyet - Russian

Hold out either hand and firmly bring together the first two fingers and the thumb (like if you were making an 'omg you're just going on and on' motion, but using only the first two fingers, not all four, on top of the thumb), once. - ASL.

There are several good video dictionaries of the ASL if you want to look to see it, to perhaps describe it more concisely, heh.

Christabelle
12-22-2014, 10:41 PM
Spanish - No
German - Nein
Hungarian - Nem

alleycat
12-22-2014, 10:43 PM
You can go to one of the online translators and get it translated in to a number of languages.

For example, Bing: http://www.bing.com/translator/

chompers
12-22-2014, 10:44 PM
Some of the languages differentiate how it's spoken based on how it's used. So that might make a difference in the responses you get.

For instance, in Mandarin, if you want to just say no, as if something tragic happening and you're screaming, "Nooooooo!!!!!!" it would be one word (不!!!!). But then if it's "No, [I am not]," it's two words (不是 -- bu shi)*

*Actually, seeing your name, I'm going to assume you know this already, so sorry if I've overexplained.


French: Non.
Japanese: Iie.

I know one more, but it doesn't have an official written language, so I don't know if it'll help.

slhuang
12-22-2014, 10:53 PM
Thank you so much, guys! :D :D

Reps for all. :hooray: Keep 'em coming!


You can go to one of the online translators and get it translated in to a number of languages.

For example, Bing: http://www.bing.com/translator/

Thank you! Yes, I did that for the rough draft -- I have a paragraph in there already with nine different versions of "no." ;) But as chompers said, I'm afraid some of them are the wrong no, if that makes sense! So I thought I'd ask people here instead. ;)

Gringa
12-22-2014, 11:01 PM
and another used in Spanish a lot and means "never" .... nunca

Chase
12-22-2014, 11:17 PM
Hold out either hand and firmly bring together the first two fingers and the thumb (like if you were making an 'omg you're just going on and on' motion, but using only the first two fingers, not all four, on top of the thumb), once. - ASL.

Good description of ASL's emphatic "no." Here are some subtle variations:
http://www.lifeprint.com/asl101/pages-signs/n/no.htm

I once went with a sweet Norwegian girl: no (way) = ikke

One of the first terms I learned in Vietnam: no, negative = khng

Amadan
12-22-2014, 11:21 PM
Arabic: la
Korean: aniyo

jvc
12-22-2014, 11:27 PM
You might need to point out to the reader that all of these words mean 'no'. Because otherwise the reader may just think it's gibberish.

Zelenka
12-22-2014, 11:34 PM
My Norwegian friend just says 'Nei' (pronounced kind of like 'nigh') for 'no' as an exclamation. She's said to me before though that it varies from region to region.

Czech - Ne

Slovak - Nie

Scots Gaelic is a weird one and doesn't really have a word for 'no', so they tend to say 'Chan eil' (pronounced 'han yel') which is 'am not' or would answer with the verb that was in the original question in the negative. So you wouldn't say No if you were asked 'do you understand' you would say 'not understand'.

Portuguese - no

Same as if someone asks you to say something in another language, I've gone blank on any others. I think Dutch is nee but I'm not sure on the spelling.

Sunflowerrei
12-22-2014, 11:38 PM
Japanese: Iie.


Mmm. Yeah. But "iie" is generally pretty polite and I don't know if it'll work in the context SL described. I think something like "dame" (which means something like"don't" basically in Japanese) could work better.

chompers
12-23-2014, 12:08 AM
Mmm. Yeah. But "iie" is generally pretty polite and I don't know if it'll work in the context SL described. I think something like "dame" (which means something like"don't" basically in Japanese) could work better.
Oh, yes, much better. Sorry, slhuang, blanked out earlier. I blame it on not having gone to bed yet. :P

Dennis E. Taylor
12-23-2014, 01:59 AM
No. Non. Nix. Negative. Uh-uh. Nyet. Hellno. Negatory. Nak. Nyetsky. Screw that. Not gonna happen.


No.

StarryEyes
12-23-2014, 03:00 AM
Swedish - nej

Icelandic - nei

My Swiss German friend says "nee". Don't know if it's common or if it's just her though.

Chris P
12-23-2014, 03:03 AM
Hapana - Swahili

Nedda - Luganda

Tocotin
12-23-2014, 03:48 AM
Polish: nie.

Japanese iie would work well for your purpose, because it usually begins a negative sentence. It's not much used separately, and when it is, it's not that polite.

Deb Kinnard
12-23-2014, 04:31 AM
Italian: no
Spanish, a tad bit more color: en tus sueos (in your dreams). If you want "in my dreams" it'd be en mis sueos.

amergina
12-23-2014, 04:43 AM
Hayır -- Turkish. (Note that the i has no dot.)

Siri Kirpal
12-23-2014, 04:43 AM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Not sure how the Punjabi is transliterated, but it sounds like NEY (or neigh). Usually it's said twice: ney, ney.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Sunflowerrei
12-23-2014, 05:06 AM
Is this for Rio, SL?

Tepelus
12-23-2014, 05:37 AM
Romanian - Nu.

Ken
12-23-2014, 05:39 AM
American Legalize (or whatnot) - Nay

slhuang
12-23-2014, 05:43 AM
You guys are AMAZING! Thank you! (And the funny replies are cracking me up.)


You might need to point out to the reader that all of these words mean 'no'. Because otherwise the reader may just think it's gibberish.

Yah, no worries, I'm definitely trying to make sure it's clear what's happening. :)


Is this for Rio, SL?

Hee hee HOW DID YOU GUESS :heart:

L M Ashton
12-23-2014, 07:14 AM
Ne - Sinhalese (but Sinhalese uses a different alphabet, so this is only mostly close - and the e is pronounced like the A in Apple. Sort of. The sounds don't entirely translate to English sounds.)

Tidak in Malay (but I suspect you already know that, slhuang, right?)

Debbie V
12-24-2014, 12:34 AM
Lo in Hebrew.

beckethm
12-24-2014, 12:56 AM
Irish - n hea (pronounced "nee ha")

Tazlima
12-24-2014, 01:17 AM
My Swiss German friend says "nee". Don't know if it's common or if it's just her though.

Is she a knight?

(Sorry, couldn't resist). :D

Sunflowerrei
12-24-2014, 11:24 PM
Hee hee HOW DID YOU GUESS :heart:

Just had a feeling. Cas might know a bunch of obscure languages, but Rio definitely does.

Putputt
12-25-2014, 07:24 AM
Indo: Tidak.
Javanese: Ora.

Is he trying to say no to killing the puppy, you sicko?

StarryEyes
12-25-2014, 02:27 PM
Is she a knight?

(Sorry, couldn't resist). :D

Took me a while, I laughed so hard when I finally got it!

books2thesky
12-26-2014, 10:07 PM
The only specific language that's important for me to include is Tagalog, which I got as "Walang" from Google Translate, but I do not know if that makes sense in this context. :o

It does not, in fact, make sense! "Walang X" is "there is no X"; the word for "no" as a refusal is "hindi."

[EDIT 2: finally noticed that you specified the context in your original post. I fail at reading comprehension. At least I gave the right answer in spite of it... :tongue]

slhuang
12-26-2014, 10:18 PM
It does not, in fact, make sense! "Walang X" is "there is no X"; the word for "no" as a refusal is "hindi."
(if the character does happen to want to say that there is no X or that he doesn't have X, the exclamation would be "wala.")

e.g.

"Will you tell me the location of the rebel base?"
"No. Nyet. Hindi."

"Is there a base on Yavin?" / "Do you have the Death Star plans?"
"No. Nyet. Wala."

Oh, THANK YOU!

*goes to change right away*

Really appreciate it. :D You have saved me!!

Thanks to everyone else, too -- I think I've got enough. If you feel moved, feel free to add in case this thread is ever helpful to anyone else, but I think I'm set. :D

books2thesky
12-26-2014, 10:21 PM
Happy to help!

boron
12-27-2014, 06:16 PM
Slovenian, Croatian, Bosnian and Serbian (from former Yugoslavian republics):
"Ne"

mrsmig
12-27-2014, 06:29 PM
Hawaiian: 'a'ole

Torill
12-27-2014, 09:19 PM
I once went with a sweet Norwegian girl: no (way) = ikke
An ordinary 'no' = nei. 'Ikke!' is something you'd say to stop someone doing something that you don't want. As in 'Don't!' (Ikke = not)

If you want 'no way', I'd say 'Ikke snakk om!' (literally 'not talk about', as in 'not up for discussion') Or the more informal 'ferdig snakka' = 'talk finished', as in 'end of discussion'.

GailD
12-28-2014, 03:38 AM
Afrikaans - Nee, pronounced 'nee-a.' (Has Dutch-German origin.)

Zulu - Cha,qha or hhayi. This depends on the context in which the word is used. No, thanks - Cha, ngiyabonga.

Dawnstorm
12-28-2014, 04:32 AM
Mmm. Yeah. But "iie" is generally pretty polite and I don't know if it'll work in the context SL described. I think something like "dame" (which means something like"don't" basically in Japanese) could work better.

I'm thinking "iyada" (often shortened to "yada") in that context. It's a reaction to something unpleasant and is often used to refuse things. (See this page (http://www.jref.com/japanese/japanese-slang/) about Japanese slang.)

afarnam
12-28-2014, 05:47 AM
Already covered most of mine Czech, Polish, Russian, German, Arabic.

But I've got one. "Na" is "no" in Romanes, the language of the Roma, the "real" Gypsies of Europe.

Marlys
12-28-2014, 06:49 AM
Finnish: ei.

Sunflowerrei
12-28-2014, 08:52 AM
I'm thinking "iyada" (often shortened to "yada") in that context. It's a reaction to something unpleasant and is often used to refuse things. (See this page (http://www.jref.com/japanese/japanese-slang/) about Japanese slang.)

Yeah, maybe. If someone is demanding the character do something he finds distasteful, then "yada" would work. If it's something he's stopping himself (or another person) from doing, "dame" fits.

"Iie" is "no," but maybe it's just my family, but we never use "iie," so it sounds formal to me--we usually just say "no."

Dawnstorm
12-28-2014, 11:48 AM
Yeah, maybe. If someone is demanding the character do something he finds distasteful, then "yada" would work. If it's something he's stopping himself (or another person) from doing, "dame" fits.

"Iie" is "no," but maybe it's just my family, but we never use "iie," so it sounds formal to me--we usually just say "no."

Hm, re-reading the opening post, "dame" seems to work better, since he's tempted to do it (and you're unlikely to be tempted by something you find distasteful). I sort of missed that part while first reading it, and I automatically imagined "I'm not going to be that person" as a strong reaction against an outside demand.

Keyan
12-31-2014, 05:16 PM
Hindi: 'No' is 'nahi' - (nuh-hee) but the i is pronounced nasally, so it's often transcribed as 'nahin'

Bengali - Na

Tamil - ille (pronounced il-leh or il-lay - the double L is pronounced as two sounds).

greendragon
02-06-2015, 10:48 PM
Irish Gaelic:
N hea (Nee haa; literally, 'it is not')