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MaCain
12-17-2014, 09:54 PM
To kickstart the launch of my new website and celebrate all the Nanowrimo winners, I am giving away a professional developmental edit to one person, for the first 50,000 words of their manuscript. You can enter the giveaway from now until Jan. 1, 2015.

More details can be found at:
http://www.marycaineditor.com/#!Tips-for-Revising-a-Critique-Giveaway/co3i/F2C0D675-FBCD-46B6-8BB2-A29D455DA615

Old Hack
12-18-2014, 01:51 AM
To kickstart the launch of my new website and celebrate all the Nanowrimo winners, I am giving away a professional developmental edit to one person, for the first 50,000 words of their manuscript. You can enter the giveaway from now until Jan. 1, 2015.

More details can be found at:
http://tinyurl.com/m4xg72j

In your profile here you say about yourself,


Biography

I'm a stay at home mom of two boys. I graduated with a degree in Fashion Design from SCAD.. I haven't done anything professional with my degree but as it turns out, I love writing just as much (if not more) than design.

Occupation

Stay at home mom, seamstressI don't see much publishing experience there. How, then, can you offer a "professional developmental edit"?

I'm not trying to be snarky, and I don't mean to put you on the spot: but if you're going to edit anyone's work they need to know what your training, experience and expertise is. I've seen lots of writers' work and technique spoiled by incompetent editing, and I'd hate to see that happen to anyone here.

MaCain
12-18-2014, 04:14 AM
Old Hack,

That's a very good question. I haven't updated my bio since I joined, and I definitely am going to do that now.

Yes, my degree is in Fashion Design, but in the past few years I've done a lot of freelance writing and editing. I've written several grant proposals and helped write/edit speeches for a local politician. In the way of fiction, I have done developmental edits for 3 published authors who would gladly provide references (2 trad. published, 1 self pub). Two other writers that I have done extensive developmental editing for have recently found agents and I'm confident they'll see their novels published soon.

I don't have a degree in English, no, so I'm only able to offer solid references and a sample of my services so that writers can test the waters. As far as a writers work or technique being spoiled by incompetent editing, that's unfortunate, but at the end of the day, it's the writer who makes all final decisions regarding revisions. I don't expect anyone to take all of my suggests to heart, and I don't expect anyone to hire me if they aren't confident in my abilities.

As far as the giveaway, it's free, so the winner has nothing to lose.

Old Hack
12-18-2014, 11:36 AM
Old Hack,

That's a very good question. I haven't updated my bio since I joined, and I definitely am going to do that now.

Yes, my degree is in Fashion Design, but in the past few years I've done a lot of freelance writing and editing. I've written several grant proposals and helped write/edit speeches for a local politician.

Writing grant proposals and speeches does not provide you with the skills you need to be a good editor.


In the way of fiction, I have done developmental edits for 3 published authors who would gladly provide references (2 trad. published, 1 self pub). Two other writers that I have done extensive developmental editing for have recently found agents and I'm confident they'll see their novels published soon.

Working on five books does not make you a professional editor.


I don't have a degree in English, no, so I'm only able to offer solid references and a sample of my services so that writers can test the waters.

I don't have a degree in English either: I don't think one is necessary for editors. All sorts of other things are useful, though, and a few are essential: for example, solid mentoring while learning the skill; and a talent for it, too, which few people have.

There's a great post here about the skills a copy editor should have:

[Publishing Services] What should I ask a prospective copy editor? (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=271090)

I know you don't offer copy editing, but it does give an excellent indication of the level of talent, experience and expertise that good editors require in order to work effectively.


As far as a writers work or technique being spoiled by incompetent editing, that's unfortunate,

"Unfortunate" makes it sound as though it's an accident. I suspect that the novice writers whose work is thus affected would prefer a stronger descriptor.


but at the end of the day, it's the writer who makes all final decisions regarding revisions.

It is: but many writers often don't understand that, nor do they always have the skill to recognise poor advice--especially when it comes from someone who bills themselves as a "professional editor".

Also, I don't think it appropriate to try to place the blame for a poor editor onto the shoulders of the writers whose work the editor spoils.


I don't expect anyone to take all of my suggests to heart, and I don't expect anyone to hire me if they aren't confident in my abilities.

I'd like it if you could provide more substantial information about your experience and training on your website, because at the moment I'm not sure there's enough there for writers to make a fully informed decision.

I'd also suggest that you consider how you can make it clear to writers that editors' suggestions are only that: it's a message more writers need to hear.


As far as the giveaway, it's free, so the winner has nothing to lose.

You've not edited many books. If you couple that inexperience with no substantial knowledge of the genres you're working in, then the winner has months or years of work to lose.

For your information, I've worked in publishing for about thirty years, have edited more books than I can remember, and have written quite a few too. You might be a brilliant editor: but you might not, and even if you are talented you don't have enough experience yet to do the very best job every time, and you don't appear to have anyone mentoring you to catch you when you slip.

I don't intend to upset you or to make you feel put-upon, but this is a real problem with inexperienced editors and I don't want anyone to go into this without understanding what they might be facing.