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cylemmulo
12-02-2014, 06:17 AM
So I wrote a short story that I actually like a lot. I was looking to submit it to some different places (Clarkesworld, Apex, etc.) My question is, do most people submit to multiple magazines at once? Am I going to hurt a relationship with one if they accept it, and then I tell them it's already been printed elsewhere?

Dmbeucler
12-02-2014, 06:37 AM
For magazines you query one at a time. (At least the ones I've submitted to which sounds like the same ones you are submitting to now.) Most of them are pretty quick responders, with the exception of Tor. But Tor's slush pile volume has always been epic, and they responded to me within 2 months. So it wasn't that bad.

But first published rights for short stories are pretty important, so if you sell it to two places, likely only one would actually buy it and run it. And having to turn down an acceptance because it was being published elsewhere might annoy editors.

Little Ming
12-02-2014, 06:49 AM
So I wrote a short story that I actually like a lot. I was looking to submit it to some different places (Clarkesworld, Apex, etc.) My question is, do most people submit to multiple magazines at once? Am I going to hurt a relationship with one if they accept it, and then I tell them it's already been printed elsewhere?

Check guidelines. The vast majority are very clear about simultaneous submissions.

Fruitbat
12-02-2014, 07:30 AM
Check guidelines. The vast majority are very clear about simultaneous submissions.

Yep. Also, fyi "multiple submissions" means sending more than one story to the same magazine at a time. "Simultaneous submissions" means sending the same story to more than one publisher at the same time.

Filigree
12-02-2014, 07:52 AM
Yep. Don't do simultaneous submissions unless the magazine clearly says it's acceptable (and usually they ask you to let them know in your cover letter.)

I have heard multiple editors here on AW and elsewhere grumble about finding a great story - and then realizing it's out at other markets. Most of them really don't like that. Unless the story is incredible, the mere fact of it being a simultaneous submission is going to knock points off in consideration. And editors do remember annoyance factors, especially if those seem chronic with a particular author.

"...and then I tell them it's already been printed elsewhere?" That's a 'reprint'. Some markets take them, but at a much lower per-word payment. Some markets won't take them at all. Usually, you'll know from their guidelines, but never be afraid to ask first.

cylemmulo
12-02-2014, 08:18 AM
Thanks for the great information everyone! I appreciate all the input.

Drachen Jager
12-02-2014, 08:45 AM
The Submission Grinder will tell you whether mags are multiple sub or not (most of them aren't). Always check the guidelines to be sure, but Duotrope or The Grinder are really useful tools for submitting shorts.

Duotrope is a pay service and I believe The Grinder is still free (haven't used it in a while). They also let you track your stories and have cool graphs and charts so you know when to expect a response.

sabindanjoup
12-02-2014, 10:22 AM
...
Duotrope is a pay service and I believe The Grinder is still free (haven't used it in a while). They also let you track your stories and have cool graphs and charts so you know when to expect a response.

Yes, the Grinder is still free.
Ah, the small mercies! :)

Filigree
12-02-2014, 04:01 PM
Ralan.com is still somewhat useful for genre submission lists (science fiction, fantasy, horror).

Some AW authors do really well at selling reprints, sometimes getting more for the second or third sale of a story than for the first. Me, not so well. I usually give up after a few years of trying - sometimes, I'll put a previously-published story up on my blog for a free read.

Good luck with your quest!

Phaeal
12-02-2014, 05:27 PM
I generally sub shorts to one market at a time, whether the market allows simultaneous subs or not. I give the market two months past its stated wait time (or Duotrope average), then query. If I get no response to the query in two weeks, I then move on and sub elsewhere.

I have one short out to a market that's had it since April -- 2013. Yeah, I think I'll resub that baby when I get a little time off from the novels. ;)

Jamesaritchie
12-02-2014, 06:44 PM
The problem with simultaneous submissions is that you're firing all your bullets at once. If the story has a problem, you won't have a chance to work on the problems, or problems, between submissions.

My experience is that good stories don't need to be submitted to several mags at once, and poor stories are just harmed by it.

Writers tend to want to use simultaneous submissions because they think it takes too long to submit to one magazine at a time. They need to stop worrying about time, and worry about selling. Selling is easier when you get editorial feedback while still having good magazines remaining that you can submit the story to. Such feedback is useless, if you've already blown through all the good markets.

Submit to one magazine, sit down and write another story, submit it to one magazine, and so on. It won't be long before you have enough stories circulating that you hear back from one market or another every week.

Polenth
12-03-2014, 07:31 PM
Magazines don't have guidelines for fun. They have them because they want people to follow them. If you don't, and they find out, they will be unhappy with you. It's not the best way to start a business relationship.

cylemmulo
12-03-2014, 11:36 PM
Magazines don't have guidelines for fun. They have them because they want people to follow them. If you don't, and they find out, they will be unhappy with you. It's not the best way to start a business relationship.

I get that, but some of them just don't specify. So I was looking more for a general rule of thumb. I see now that many of them do mention simultaneous submissions though.