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jaus tail
11-19-2014, 02:40 PM
i saw this in a tv show and was wondering whether this is a possible.

a cow eats lots of money that was placed in the barn. then the villagers give the cow some laxative. the cow poops. the villagers wash and dry the money.

is this possible? wouldnt the cow's digestive enzymes ruin the money?

Helix
11-19-2014, 02:51 PM
If the money were coins, there'd be no change*.

Paper money would be destroyed because of the digestive process of ruminants.

I'm not sure how polymer notes would go.

*Arf! Arf!

Ken
11-19-2014, 04:06 PM
lol
good plot

Captcha
11-19-2014, 04:55 PM
If the cow had ENOUGH laxatives would the notes move through her system fast enough to not be digested?

(I know, cows are good digesters. I'm just trying to think if there's ANY way for it work...)

Thewitt
11-19-2014, 05:04 PM
Most paper money is made of linen, not cellulose. Cows cannot digest linen so the money would pass thru undigested.

Helix
11-19-2014, 05:29 PM
Most paper money is made of linen, not cellulose. Cows cannot digest linen so the money would pass thru undigested.

So what's linen made of?

Thewitt
11-19-2014, 05:37 PM
US paper money is 75% cotton fiber and 25% linen fiber.

Linen is made from flax.

Though both are plants, and both cottonseed and flax seed can be digested by cows, the fiber is not readily digested.

EMaree
11-19-2014, 05:45 PM
Depends entirely on what the money's made of, really. So I guess the first thing you need to decide on is the nationality of your heifer. :)

Helix
11-19-2014, 05:45 PM
I would ask what flax is made of, but it's not really worth the effort.

Anyway, since a cow is a cud-chewer, anything chewable that goes in one end is going to be in a mess by the time it comes out of the other.

EMaree
11-19-2014, 05:51 PM
I haven't ever handled a polymer note, so I'm curious -- would a cow actually be able to chew it up? I see them called 'almost impossible (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2416755/Is-end-paper-bank-note-Bank-England-unveils-plans-plastic-cash-survive-spin-washing-machine-just-dont-try-ironing-it.html) to tear (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaTtGHcpdXM)' a lot, which makes me think they'd be a difficult task even for a determined moo-er.

Helix
11-19-2014, 05:55 PM
I've got some polymer notes here, but I'm not game to try nibbling at them. Not even for AW! They're tough, but I don't think they're indestructible.

King Neptune
11-19-2014, 06:01 PM
Both cotton and flax are cellulose like sawdust and wood pulp. The laxative would have to be strong and quickly administered.

ArtsyAmy
11-19-2014, 08:07 PM
Not sure if the money would be okay, but I'm doubting it would be. As Captcha said, cows are good digesters. I have a horse and a former bull--now an ox. I can say that equine poo and bovine poo are quite different in that one can look at horse poo and tell what the horse has eaten. If Ace, the horse, has eaten grass, there's grass in what he leaves behind. On the other hand, that which Lewis, the ox named after C.S., leaves behind provides no indication of what he's eaten. My guess is that even if the bits of fibers couldn't be fully digested, the money would have gotten all torn up after getting wet inside the animal and chewed and chewed and chewed. I haven't used laxatives with either horse or ox--not sure if that would allow the money to pass through okay. I guess if it were possible for the money to be okay, the laxative would have to be given almost at the same time that the bovine ate the cash. Just guessing...

Bolero
11-19-2014, 08:31 PM
Other folks have already said - lots of chewing, lots of water, probably trashed - I'm with them I'm afraid.

And then I just had to add the one from the Darwin Awards about the elephant given a laxative.....

http://www.darwinawards.com/legends/legends1998-09.html

Tazlima
11-19-2014, 10:55 PM
If Ace, the horse, has eaten grass, there's grass in what he leaves behind. On the other hand, that which Lewis, the ox named after C.S., leaves behind provides no indication of what he's eaten. My guess is that even if the bits of fibers couldn't be fully digested, the money would have gotten all torn up after getting wet inside the animal and chewed and chewed and chewed.

This.

Cows chew cud, which basically involves barfing up mouthfuls of partially-digested food and chewing it a second time to aid in digestion. It's my (very far from expert) understanding that food has to reach a certain point in this process before it will continue on to the next portion of the digestive process.

I don't know if giving a cow a laxative would force the food past this part of their digestion (like drinking water to swallow a pill), or if it would simply empty the latter part of their digestive tract where the food was already broken down.

What about giving the cow an emitic? They seem kind of designed for puking anyway and the money wouldn't be nearly as damaged.

jaus tail
11-20-2014, 07:41 AM
thanks. but it was fun to watch that scene when they were giving the cow laxative.

Chris P
11-20-2014, 08:11 AM
I dunno about the "good digesters" part. The cow poop I've scooped up was still pretty green with recognizable bits of grass, although pretty well pulverized to goo. Cotton and flax fibers are both cellulose, btw. Paper from wood contains a lot more lignin in addition to cellulose than linen or cotton does, with cotton having even less lignin than linen does.

Now, I do know what happens to US paper money when it goes through a chocolate lab (that dog could and would eat anything!). It comes out very discolored and stiff, but more or less intact. Just in case you need to know, wait until after the bank clerk exchanges it for fresh bills to tell her what happened to it.

Thewitt
11-20-2014, 08:35 AM
When a ruminant chews cud, it comes up from the first stomach. Items that the body decides cannot be digested move more quickly through the digestive system, and yes can come out nearly intact. Spend any time on a working farm - not a bug commercial farm where feed is always controlled, but a small family farm where pastures are multi-use and animals eat many things they probably shouldn't and you will see this.

It's perfectly plausible that linen based money will pass through a cow relatively intact.

mccardey
11-20-2014, 08:40 AM
I haven't ever handled a polymer note, so I'm curious -- would a cow actually be able to chew it up?

A polymer cow could chew it.

ETA: Ok. Someone who quite clearly needs to remain anonymous (it was Helix) just repped me with the comment that a polymoo cow could chew it.

So - moooving on...

ETA 2: Helix started it.

Bolero
11-20-2014, 09:34 AM
When a ruminant chews cud, it comes up from the first stomach. Items that the body decides cannot be digested move more quickly through the digestive system, and yes can come out nearly intact. Spend any time on a working farm - not a bug commercial farm where feed is always controlled, but a small family farm where pastures are multi-use and animals eat many things they probably shouldn't and you will see this.

It's perfectly plausible that linen based money will pass through a cow relatively intact.

OK - and doing a partial U turn - I'm convinced on what Thewitt says. But wouldn't that be with occasional items?

And having thought about it properly, why would a cow eat a lot of money in the first place? So one bill, a few bills, mixed in with feed, coated with molasses - that might go down and be in with the general tummy slurry. But the quantities of money the OP is talking about - would the cow eat that much?
If the cow has eaten lots of stuff it can't digest, does the send it on through/send it up for chewing system cope with mostly send it through?

Though having said that I just remembered this story
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/west_midlands/3614022.stm

Canvas can be linen and cotton. The aircraft bits clearly had something tasty on them. However, just because the cows bit off all the canvas, there is a chance they didn't swallow just wandered off and dropped it. No information on whether the canvas showed up in the poop.

And then I watched the video with the model airplane that also came up in the search

http://fpvcentral.net/2013/11/cow-eats-fpv-plane/

You can see a cow chewing on a bit with wires hanging out of it, but otherwise largely licking. I think they were youngsters - not sure. Do remember a neighbour saying that a calf will eat anything until it knows better and he has to make sure there are no bits of baler twine in the field for example as that can cause problems for the calf it it eats it - goes in part way and gets stuck.

OP - you might want to do searches on laxatives on cows and the like. Am wondering whether you'd give laxative of the prune variety or paraffin oil as you give to cats to help them pass a hairball.

Helix
11-20-2014, 09:43 AM
Well, I've got three US dollar bills in my foreign money bag, which I could test feed to droughtmasters, but it's hot and the buggers are on the other side of the paddock, so it'll have to wait for another day.

I'd be surprised if any of it survived the spit, molars and big sloppy cow tongue.

mccardey
11-20-2014, 09:44 AM
And having thought about it properly, why would a cow eat a lot of money in the first place?

A goat would eat them. Because - goat. We used to keep goats. Goats eat anything.

That was pre-polymer, though. You should find a goat and test that hypothesis before you use it, OP.

Thewitt
11-20-2014, 11:32 AM
Well, I've got three US dollar bills in my foreign money bag, which I could test feed to droughtmasters, but it's hot and the buggers are on the other side of the paddock, so it'll have to wait for another day.

I'd be surprised if any of it survived the spit, molars and big sloppy cow tongue.

If I still lived on the farm I would definitely test this one... assuming you can keep them locked up until they pass the money... I don't think I'd want to wander over 20 acres looking for the right cow pie...

cornflake
11-20-2014, 12:06 PM
A goat would eat them. Because - goat. We used to keep goats. Goats eat anything.

That was pre-polymer, though. You should find a goat and test that hypothesis before you use it, OP.

I think ducks eat most anything too.

:gone:

mccardey
11-20-2014, 12:14 PM
I think ducks eat most anything too.

:gone:

Goats eat ducks.

Helix
11-20-2014, 12:18 PM
I think ducks eat most anything too.

:gone:


I don't know what you mean...

Captcha
11-20-2014, 03:19 PM
They have those cow magnets to catch metal stuff - for some reason, the cow magnet doesn't get pooped out, even though it's indigestible. I guess it's too heavy?

(this is tangential to the main discussion, I know, but now I'm just thinking about cow digestive systems!)

Bolero
11-20-2014, 10:08 PM
Huh, live and learn. I'd heard of magnets (very large ones) in factories processing grain - to grab all metal rubbish before the grain goes into the mill, but not actually in a cow.

jaus tail
11-21-2014, 08:08 AM
cows should be the judge on that masterchef show.

Thewitt
11-21-2014, 08:16 AM
They have those cow magnets to catch metal stuff - for some reason, the cow magnet doesn't get pooped out, even though it's indigestible. I guess it's too heavy?

(this is tangential to the main discussion, I know, but now I'm just thinking about cow digestive systems!)

Cow magnets can be passed, but it's not common. Cows are not particularly smart animals and when they graze they will eat any odd bits of metal that happen to be in the pasture. Along fence lines this is typically lots barbs off barb-wire fencing. It can also include fencing nails and really anything they pick up with the grass.

These bits of metal can pass through the walls of the first stomach and cause major issues - even death. The cow magnet grabs all these bits and keeps them from being pushed around in the first stomach.

They are passed on occasion, but it can be a very painful process for the cow and cause damage as well if there is much "junk" attached to the magnet.

mccardey
11-21-2014, 08:19 AM
Huh, live and learn. I'd heard of magnets (very large ones) in factories processing grain - to grab all metal rubbish before the grain goes into the mill, but not actually in a cow.

They're also really handy if you want to attach the cow to a fridge.

For any reason.

lacygnette
11-21-2014, 09:12 PM
They're also really handy if you want to attach the cow to a fridge.

For any reason.
I snorted my coffee!

Casey Karp
11-21-2014, 10:00 PM
They're also really handy if you want to attach the cow to a fridge.

Note: Do not try this trick with a consumer-grade refrigerator. Use a professional walk-in model, unless you want the cow to walk out of the house with the fridge stuck to her back.

Budget tip: If you can't afford a walk-in fridge, simply make sure to invert the cow before sticking it to the fridge door.

mccardey
11-22-2014, 01:16 AM
Budget tip: If you can't afford a walk-in fridge, simply make sure to invert the cow before sticking it to the fridge door. Why do they never put these tips in the manuals?? I suppose they make money on the call-outs.