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Thuro
11-18-2014, 11:16 AM
So if the title is a little confusing I understand. Keep reading. It'll get clearer as you keep reading.

Does anyone know of a mental disorder that has the following effects (or something similar)?

Details popping out instead of forming a whole picture.
Instinctively on subtle things it takes most people several seconds to pick up but having to concentrate to see the larger picture.

My character has small details jump out at her, kind of like a normal human brain in reverse. You and I might see a shirt, then note its color, then look to see what its made out of.
Her brain does this in reverse. She immediately notices the material, then the fact that this is a shirt, and then that its yellow.

cornflake
11-18-2014, 11:21 AM
That doesn't sound like any disorder I'm aware of. Perhaps someone will come along and know one for you.

It sounds like simply how someone thinks - maybe an autistic-type thing, but it doesn't read as disordered the way I'm reading it. I could also be reading it incorrectly and missing something.

arcan
11-18-2014, 12:43 PM
Cirnflake is right. Some autists present similar problems, like a famius one who will see two dogs but won't think of them as the same kind of animal because too many details are not the same. He sees the details but not the feneral oicture of the dog. If you want to google, he us the one who draws scenes he has just glimpsed with an incredible amount of details.

TheNighSwan
11-18-2014, 01:41 PM
"Normal" people aren't that good at grasping the whole picture either. What actually happens is we pick up a few significant details, and the rest of the scene is largely *reconstructed* in our head, rather than actually perceived and memorised.

Cathy C
11-18-2014, 04:14 PM
Traumatic obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) might work for you. Some people with OCD have a compulsive need to put items in order by means of certain narrow criteria, called symmetry or exactness obsessions (http://www.ocdtypes.com/symmetry-ocd.php). There's some question whether it's that the brain actually only sees the criteria first (the cloth material) or whether the brain notices the whole shirt. But it can be argued that the person experiencing the event won't know what was noticed first. They have no choice but to make the arrangement by the criteria.

Just one option. :) Think the TV character "Monk" for some elements of symmetry disorder caused by traumatic OCD.

Muppster
11-18-2014, 05:12 PM
Details popping out instead of forming a whole picture.

Watch this video (http://youtu.be/82tlVcq6E7A).

A guy who’s had the connection between his hemispheres severed is presented with a portrait constructed from fruit (some wacky renaissance ‘modernism’!). He can only see the bigger picture (a face) when it’s presented to one eye; he can only see the detail (fruit) when it’s presented to the other (a bi-product of the split is that each eye’s visual input is processed by only one hemisphere).

The above example only works if your protagonist looks at stuff through only one eye at a time. Pinker’s Language Instinct (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Language-Instinct-Science-Mind-Penguin-ebook/dp/B002RI9DJW/ref=sr_1_1_twi_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416316055&sr=8-1&keywords=language+instinct+steven+pinker) talks about this weirdness more; people who’ve had strokes/brain injuries can ‘lose’ a field of vision even though the eye still works, or be able to process certain information in only one field. Keep in mind the brain is pretty plastic; most of these effects are seen as the result of something traumatic. Folks who’re born with structural abnormality or get injured young often rewire and function normally.

Thuro
11-19-2014, 03:55 AM
Traumatic obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) might work for you. Some people with OCD have a compulsive need to put items in order by means of certain narrow criteria, called symmetry or exactness obsessions (http://www.ocdtypes.com/symmetry-ocd.php). There's some question whether it's that the brain actually only sees the criteria first (the cloth material) or whether the brain notices the whole shirt. But it can be argued that the person experiencing the event won't know what was noticed first. They have no choice but to make the arrangement by the criteria.

Just one option. :) Think the TV character "Monk" for some elements of symmetry disorder caused by traumatic OCD.

Thanks :). That's definitely a step in the right direction.