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poetinahat
11-10-2014, 08:46 AM
Don't worry that the process of revision seems slow. The writer's tools were developed early - paper, pen, and ink; a watchful eye; an open heart - and good writing is still the patient handiwork of those simple tools. A poet who makes only one really fine poem during his life gives far more to the world than the poet who publishes twenty books of mediocre verse. The Industrial Revolution did not reach imaginative writing until recently, and today black clouds of soot belch from the smokestacks over the creative writing schools. Poems get manufactured and piled on the loading docks where many of them rot for lack of transport. Wouldn't we all be better off if there wasn't such an emphasis on productivity?

At a party, I once heard a woman say that it was "criminal" that Harper Lee had written only the one novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. What peculiar expectations we've developed for our writers! "Criminal?" We ought to be thankful Lee used her time to write her book as perfectly as she could, that she didn't rush a lot of half-finished books into print.

-- Ted Kooser, from The Poetry Home Repair Manual


You cannot work too hard at poetry. People are bad at it not because they have tin ears, but because they simply don't have the faintest idea how much work goes into it. It's not as if you're ordering a pizza or doing something that requires direct communication in a very banal way. But it seems these days the only people who spend time over things are retired people and prisoners. We bolt things, untasted.

It's so easy to say, 'That'll do.' Everyone's in a hurry. People are intellectually lazy, morally lazy, ethically lazy...

-- Stephen Fry, from an interview with The Daily Telegraph (http://mentalfloss.com/article/31792/12-stephen-frys-wise-witty-quotations)

Magdalen
11-10-2014, 08:39 PM
Thanks, PIAH! I could not agree more!!

Williebee
11-10-2014, 08:59 PM
And true of so much besides poetry, as well.

CassandraW
11-10-2014, 11:18 PM
+1. A lot of people seem to believe that because something is just a few lines long, it shouldn't take much time to write. Yeah, I can toss off a silly verse in a few minutes. But an actual poem -- that's serious work. I can go back and forth on a single word choice for weeks.

KTC
11-10-2014, 11:25 PM
a good poem, like a fine wine,
when found, should be teeming
with a richness unmeasured by measure.
for a good poem stays with you
wherever you go,for the rest of life.
A good poem, like lips made red
from a night of wine-ing,
is very much a moveable feast.

Williebee
11-11-2014, 01:05 AM
Now you're just showing off. :)

poetinahat
11-11-2014, 01:34 AM
KTC is an acronym in some little-known language for "Eat My Exceptional Dust". Blimey, dude.

B.D. Eyeslie
11-11-2014, 07:00 PM
a good poem, like a fine wine,
when found, should be teeming
with a richness unmeasured by measure.
for a good poem stays with you
wherever you go,for the rest of life.
A good poem, like lips made red
from a night of wine-ing,
is very much a moveable feast.

I would take it one step further: A good poem is fine wine.
Or maybe chocolate milk and cookies, but only if they're really good cookies.

Eli Hinze
11-11-2014, 10:24 PM
Agreed 100%.

poetinahat
11-17-2014, 03:30 AM
I'd like to add here:

If you've posted a poem for critique, and it hasn't gotten the feedback you want, please feel free to bump the thread and ask again. If it's important to you, let us know.

We sometimes get so many poems that none of them gets enough time on the stage before they're washed away by new ones.

kdaniel171
12-02-2014, 12:17 PM
Hey, I agree with the quote, but somehow those who have passion can also write the best. I would like to include real Lovers in this list.