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Writer_
11-04-2014, 11:35 PM
If there is no specific instructions, should the cover letter and synopsis be attached or in the actual e-mail?

Thanks.

Jamesaritchie
11-05-2014, 12:15 AM
In the actual e-mail. opening attachments is too risky.

Jo Zebedee
11-05-2014, 02:21 AM
If no guidelines cover letter first, then I usually did sample chapters as per guidelines and synopsis at the end (it's only usually looked at if the concept and writing grab attention.) cover letter should always be in the body of the email.

Siri Kirpal
11-05-2014, 02:36 AM
Sat Nam! (Literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Cover letter in body of email. Absolutely always.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Wilde_at_heart
11-05-2014, 03:38 AM
Don't send attachments unless it's requested material. Many agents will delete without opening.

Anything unsolicited should be in the body of the email.

Matthew Warner
02-09-2015, 08:01 PM
Okay, so assuming I'm including sample pages or chapters within the body of an email, should I:


attempt to preserve manuscript formatting (double spacing, etc.)?
strip it down to plain text styling and reformat to block paragraphs?

I'm leaning toward #2 since email browsers will display rich text inconsistently, but I haven't seen any definitive advice on this yet.

amergina
02-09-2015, 08:19 PM
Okay, so assuming I'm including sample pages or chapters within the body of an email, should I:


attempt to preserve manuscript formatting (double spacing, etc.)?
strip it down to plain text styling and reformat to block paragraphs?

I'm leaning toward #2 since email browsers will display rich text inconsistently, but I haven't seen any definitive advice on this yet.

Assume plain text. Or at least RTF, but you can't really go wrong with plain text.

Laer Carroll
02-10-2015, 02:07 AM
Usually inline as every one else says. But a few agents specifically say to include additional material as attachments. Here's one.

http://greenburger.com/agent/matt-bialer-2/

Notice that the query is inline. Likely he would only risk opening the attachment if the query convinced him the attachment was not spam or contained a virus.

Also be aware that a good anti-virus program will scan all emails with attachments. Then they will deep-scan the attached files before opening them when you attempt to open them.

Still, this is risky behavior. Even for me. I'm a computer professional with several kinds of anti-intrusion hardware & software protection on all my computers. But even so I would hesitate long before I risked opening an attachment from a stranger. And even from friends, only if I have a second comm channel to them & check through it to be sure the "friend" is not a spoofed person.