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View Full Version : Does anyone know anything about wasps?



mccardey
10-31-2014, 10:26 AM
Can it be a wasp if it doesn't have any visible thing to sting with? It's just that I have a wasp-y thing that keeps turning up in my office, even though I keep taking it outside.

Ladyxkaa
10-31-2014, 10:27 AM
can you get me a pic that looks similar to it? I know a bit about wasps cuz we used to get them a lot at my old house(we had trees that gave us LOTS of peaches

mccardey
10-31-2014, 10:29 AM
can you get me a pic that looks similar to it? I know a bit about wasps cuz we used to get them a lot at my old house(we had trees that gave us LOTS of peaches

I'm looking, but I'm hampered because a) it's not here now and b) I'm not sure what to google. Hang on....


ETA: Ahhh. I think it might be a European Wasp (http://www.lga.sa.gov.au/page.aspx?u=283). Apparently they're quite vehement about the whole stinging thing. (Although this one has been rather sweet, to date. The second time it just landed on my bare arm and let me carry it outside on my hand. Though perhaps it's just biding its time...)

Ladyxkaa
10-31-2014, 10:32 AM
edit: Holy crap! O.O....I always get stung when I let those darned this near me. Just be careful, ok? You don't wanna find out the hard way that you're allergic to them.

mccardey
10-31-2014, 10:33 AM
I see. Well, take your time with it ^^ We wanna be accurate with this. Do you have Pecans where you live? wasps and yellow-jacket's love those.

We have lots of fruit trees - apples and citrus and stone fruit. Also lots of berries.

Ladyxkaa
10-31-2014, 10:34 AM
yeah they love those. stay away as much as you can

mccardey
10-31-2014, 10:36 AM
Yes, alright. Thank you. I shall discourage it. Next time it comes in, I'll tell it - Ii dunno. Something harsh. "Those colours don't really suit you." Something like that.

Ladyxkaa
10-31-2014, 10:41 AM
ouch. sorry...

franky_s
10-31-2014, 10:42 AM
I have a wasp-y thing that keeps turning up in my office, even though I keep taking it outside.

Don't mean to alarm you but are you sure it's the same wasp? You may have a nest of them in your office. Do wasps have nests? I don't know. This isn't helpful is it?

mccardey
10-31-2014, 10:48 AM
ouch. sorry...

No - I'm serious! I'm grateful for the advice. I'm just teasing - "Discourage it" is something we say down here when we plan to napalm the place ;)

mccardey
10-31-2014, 10:49 AM
Don't mean to alarm you but are you sure it's the same wasp? You may have a nest of them in your office. Do wasps have nests? I don't know. This isn't helpful is it?

Well that suddenly sounds alarming. And on Hallowe'en, too. You make a good point. I just assumed it was the same one because - well - it looked a lot like it.

I'm suddenly wondering if I should move house or something.

Just for a while.

But it seemed like a nice wasp.

Ladyxkaa
10-31-2014, 10:55 AM
Okie dokie ^^ and don't worry too much, there are sprays and the like to get bees and wasps nests gone, withers them AND poisons the wasps

Helix
10-31-2014, 11:01 AM
Well, I can tell you summat about wasps, but it looks as though you've got it sorted.

Carry on.

Forbidden Snowflake
10-31-2014, 01:08 PM
In England whenever someone sees a wasp like thing they flap their arms wildly and run off flapping even more wildly screaming.

I always glare at them and tell them if *I* get stung because they agitated them *I* will sting *them*.

I then sit or stand there perfectly still and usually Mr. or Mrs. Wasp just sit down on me, decide I'm not edible and fly off again.

And everyone else goes: oh no, you're so brave, I could never do that!

When you don't threaten Mr. or Mrs. Wasp they're usually pleasant. BUT make sure there's no nest. Because they can get unpleasant en masse.

onesecondglance
10-31-2014, 01:24 PM
I love that, because virtually everything in Australia is actively trying to kill you, a European wasp appears not to have a stinger... :)

Parametric
10-31-2014, 01:35 PM
But it seemed like a nice wasp.

It is not a nice wasp. It is a bad wasp. It will sting you for fun and release chemicals to encourage all the other wasps to sting you too.

Does your office have a window? You might want to take a look around the outside of the house near your office in case there's a nest. Look for a stream of wasps going in and out of a hole - in brickwork, under the eaves, around the window, etc.

Rotes
10-31-2014, 01:37 PM
I personally don't, but I know of an expert. http://imgur.com/vTsFTVn
:D :D :D

Forbidden Snowflake
10-31-2014, 01:40 PM
It is not a nice wasp. It is a bad wasp. It will sting you for fun and release chemicals to encourage all the other wasps to sting you too.


They only sting when threatened. They are not having fun wile doing so ;)

but yes, a human being in the wrong place at the wrong time making the wrong gesture can seem like a threat. But still, they felt threatened. Best thing is to keep still and calm they will move on.

Parametric
10-31-2014, 02:10 PM
They only sting when threatened. They are not having fun wile doing so ;)

but yes, a human being in the wrong place at the wrong time making the wrong gesture can seem like a threat. But still, they felt threatened. Best thing is to keep still and calm they will move on.

You're part of the wasp conspiracy, aren't you. :tongue

Friendly Frog
10-31-2014, 02:31 PM
European wasps generally only sting when held or when you get too close to their nest. They sting more readily than bees because they survive to sting another day, but they're not overly agressive in my experience. Although I have never tried to test the limits of their temper...

Many wasps have moveable stingers and with European wasps those only come out when they do want to sting. My dad once showed me by gently picking up a wasp with a pincet so I could see the tiny sting come out of the abdomen.

The two times I've been stung by a wasp was near a pool, happening exactly the same way. The wasp was licking water off the inside of my knee and I didn't know it was there when I knelt down. They probably wouldn't have stung me if they hadn't felt trapped.

I've swatted wasps away with the back of my hand if they're too in-my-face, like when eating fruit or ice cream. None of those ever came back to attack me.

I generally transfer any that's strayed inside in a little jar. (I keep specific little jars for transportation of intruding insects. I may be weird like that.)

Forbidden Snowflake
10-31-2014, 02:32 PM
You're part of the wasp conspiracy, aren't you. :tongue

No :D I'm just really terrified of spiders and a few had to die because of me (putting them outside, vacuum cleaner, my dog eating them) and I feel terribly guilty, so I try to make it up by defending another unloved animal that I'm not afraid of and that so far has never stung me ;)

It's a (desperate?) attempt to improve karma.

onesecondglance
10-31-2014, 05:03 PM
I'm just really terrified of spiders and a few had to die because of me (putting them outside, vacuum cleaner, my dog eating them) and I feel terribly guilty, so I try to make it up by defending another unloved animal that I'm not afraid of and that so far has never stung me ;)

It's a (desperate?) attempt to improve karma.


I - and the sole (soul?) of my shoe - are going straight to hell...

goddammit, why can't I get the grammar of that sentence to sound right? "me [and the shoe] are" doesn't work either, but surely it can't be "I [and the shoe] am"? grr.

usuallycountingbats
10-31-2014, 05:14 PM
I suspect this is superfluous, but there are heaps of insects which look like wasps but are not wasps (and don't have stings). It's a good defense mechanism, because everything goes - oh, wasp, those sting, don't eat that.

I know nothing about invertebrates in Australia though, but I'm certain the rule of thumb over there is that everything is deadly, and should be treated accordingly.

Myrealana
10-31-2014, 05:27 PM
Wasps?!?! Kill it! Kill it with fire!

Actually, CO2 is better, in my experience, and less damaging to the house.

We had a nest of yellow jackets that moved in under our front steps. We (I say we, I mean my husband. I didn't go near the damn things) tried several kinds of poison, traps, and even covering over the hole with concrete and they just dug a new entrance.

Then, one day, I was walking the dog and looking at a snow bank (early September, first snow of the year) and I started wondering if I could pack snow into their hole and freeze them out. By the time I got home, the snow idea had become packing the entrance with dry ice.

It worked. No more wasps.

To say I don't like wasps, bees and hornets would be like saying the surface of the sun is kind of warm.

mccardey
11-01-2014, 03:40 AM
You know what other wildlife I saw today? A baby bunny. In my vegie garden.

I don't see that ending well...

Ken
11-01-2014, 03:49 AM
Went to a party a few years ago. Let a wasp sip outta my drink. Tilted it so it could get at the beverage. Conversed with the little fella too. Had a fine time. Maybe you might try something similar.

CathleenT
11-01-2014, 06:09 AM
At least you can eat the bunny. I'm afraid I usually go straight for the wasp spray. I've never been introduced to a European wasp, but our meat wasps are real pests, and build nests all over the place.

I rationalize it by saying they're bee competitors, and someone needs to help those little guys/gals out. :)

Helix
11-01-2014, 06:25 AM
You know what other wildlife I saw today? A baby bunny. In my vegie garden.

I don't see that ending well...

I saw a bunny in a neighbours' garden the other day. Unfortunately, you're not allowed to discharge a firearm in rural residential areas. Also I don't have a firearm. So I glared at the bunny and made a note to add to the RabbitScan database (http://www.feralscan.org.au/).

mccardey
11-01-2014, 06:28 AM
I saw a bunny in a neighbours' garden the other day. Unfortunately, you're not allowed to discharge a firearm in rural residential areas. Also I don't have a firearm. So I glared at the bunny and made a note to add to the RabbitScan database (http://www.feralscan.org.au/).

We have owls. So - I think that's all taken care of....

jjdebenedictis
11-01-2014, 07:46 PM
If you live in the Northern hemisphere (which you don't), wasps tend to start showing up indoors in the fall because they're looking for a nice place to hibernate (or so I've been told; why don't they go back to their existing nest?)

Maybe you've got a few that camped over-winter in your house and are now waking up? Very nice of you to ferry them outside; I do that too, although it has less to do with empathy than with getting them away from me without a lot of violence they might take offense to.

It might be different if I was actually competent at the whole swatting-to-kill thing.

Friendly Frog
11-01-2014, 11:30 PM
If you live in the Northern hemisphere (which you don't), wasps tend to start showing up indoors in the fall because they're looking for a nice place to hibernate (or so I've been told; why don't they go back to their existing nest?)
As far as the common European wasps, it's just the young queens who do this after leaving/being kicked out of the hive. Wasps go all Highlander if there's more than one grown queen in the hive.

So the new queens overwinter elsewhere and then start a new hive of their own.

You can tell the way the wasps entering indoors in fall looking for a nice cosy hibernation spot are generally larger than usual. Which I once could observe quite well when one of them crawled (loudly) under the door of my room in the middle of the night and landed on my bed just as I turned off the light. Good times.

Pyekett
11-01-2014, 11:35 PM
Trust funds, Lilly Pulitzer prints, dry gin, repressed shame, artificial laughter, and men's belts dotted with whales?

Quentin Nokov
11-02-2014, 01:33 AM
Once Upon A Time: I was peeling a boat-load of apples the one day for canning and I had hundreds flying around me. They landed on me, on my hand, on the knife, on the apple I was working on. I never got stung. Batting at them will aggravate them, so I just let them lick the sticky apple juice off my hand while I continued to peel apples. I'm nice and make sure they don't get in the way if my knife :) Bees are good, they help pollinate.

As far as I know wasps never re-use nests. So at this last in the year, I'd leave the nest be. They'll be relocating soon. I know yellow jackets go under ground for the winter, but I'm not sure where wasps go. I know with yellow jackets, if they're under ground and their nest is close to your house or shed and you don't want them there, a good way to kill them off is dumping boiling hot water into the nest at night.

Mr Flibble
11-02-2014, 01:52 AM
What I know about wasps:

The name is not wasp, it is jasper (what they're called around these here parts anyway).

They sting people

They seem to especially like cider

They make big nests

Um...

....


....

...


That's about it.

mccardey
11-02-2014, 01:57 AM
You've all been very helpful. And Pyekett was funny, so extra points for that.

I've decided to be gently discouraging, but not in an arm-waving way. We'll see how that goes.

Someone told me wasps eat cockroaches, so I was thinking of getting some cockroaches shipped in but then I thought - no that would be carrying things too far...

Forbidden Snowflake
11-02-2014, 03:14 AM
Maybe this is why you have no cockroaches.