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rhymegirl
10-18-2014, 06:18 PM
Hi everybody!

I am working on a Christmas article for the monthly publication I write for. (I don't have an okay yet from the editor but I need to have something prepared soon since the deadline is November 1st.)

So if you'd like to participate, here's my question:
What's the worst Christmas gift you ever received?
I am willing to share mine here. My parents gave me an electric can opener one year when I was single, living on my own. I looked at it and thought: Really? A can opener is a nice housewarming type of gift, but for Christmas?

If nothing stands out, what is the best Christmas gift you've received? And why?

Thank you for sharing your comments here. I will need to quote people, so please make sure you're okay with being quoted.

Magnanimoe
10-18-2014, 06:47 PM
Two bags of Cheetos, not even wrapped. But hey, at least they were the crinkly kind.

But there was also this toy airport with a hangar, parking ramp, etc. The toy was great but what made it the worst was that my brother and I had pestered my parents into letting us open one present on Christmas Eve. We had always been strictly Christmas morning kids. After opening the gift I just had this horrible guilt. Obviously I've never forgotten that.

I also remember a college professor, way back in 1985, telling us about the time he gave his young daughter a cow's head for Christmas. It was some kind of inside joke between the two but it totally backfired and she freaked. Merry Christmas!

TellMeAStory
10-18-2014, 06:57 PM
My mother told the story about the year (the late 1940s, I would guess) everybody gave her scented soaps, perfumes, sachets, more scented soaps...That next year she decided to bathe more often than twice a week.

Michael Davis
10-18-2014, 07:35 PM
Wort I every received was a fog horn from my in-laws. Only worked for a week.

Los Pollos Hermanos
10-18-2014, 09:40 PM
A really nasty Christmas jumper (sweater) from my Nan circa 1990 - before they were cringingly fashionable. As a 13/14 year old, I was mortified.

Now I'm getting old, I'm contemplating the purchase of:

http://www.cheesychristmasjumpers.com/product/boxing-day-mash-up-christmas-jumpers-unisex

:partyguy:

spieles
10-18-2014, 09:53 PM
My mother told the story about the year (the late 1940s, I would guess) everybody gave her scented soaps, perfumes, sachets, more scented soaps...That next year she decided to bathe more often than twice a week.

Hahahaha.

My husband had back pain for a while, so my mom and step-dad wanted to help so that got him one of those back massagers. The really funny part though is that later that evening when my husband mentioned his pain was back, my mom said, "No problem. I've got the vibrator. Now get down on the floor."

Dieeeeed.

Maryn
10-18-2014, 11:33 PM
My sister used to give me passive-aggressive gifts. She is smaller than I and slender; I've always been built more like a mailbox. Every year I would send her a brief wish list and my sizes in various items. She usually got me something on the list but many, many sizes too large, i.e., I asked for a long-sleeved yellow shirt in a size 16 and I received one in a size 24.

She did the same with books once I stopped asking for clothes. Usually the title of the one I received had one of the same words as the title of the one I'd asked for.

We no longer exchange gifts.

Maryn, good with that

Fruitbat
10-18-2014, 11:59 PM
My mother-in-law gave me a stack of Christmas gifts that I recognized as the five cheapo giveaways that came with a catalogue order. Which would have been fine except that everyone else got lovely and pricey gifts, and she was catty to me anyway. Context counts.

Gringa
10-19-2014, 12:02 AM
roll of toilet paper

alleycat
10-19-2014, 12:04 AM
I got a battery-powered tie rack one year. It's not the worst present I ever got but I thought it was funny. "Oh, wow! I don't have to reach that extra six inches to get my tie now. I'll just push this button until the right tie comes around." I never did use it. I finally gave it away to one of those charity organizations.

kuwisdelu
10-19-2014, 12:19 AM
She usually got me something on the list but many, many sizes too large
...
She did the same with books

I'm imagining this:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/143553/Funny/big-book.jpg

alleycat
10-19-2014, 12:23 AM
I have a good friend who used to get confused about what she had given me in past years. She knew I liked old movies so she gave me a copy of Casablanca . . . and a copy of Casablanca . . . and (surprise!) a copy of Casablanca.

Marian Perera
10-19-2014, 12:29 AM
I went to college in the States. The first year I was back home for Christmas, my father gave me this elaborate silver-plated three-branched candleholder with shiny glass prisms dangling from it. It was large and heavy (weight limit on the airline), utterly inappropriate for a typical college student's dorm room and couldn't be used anyway because there was a no-candles policy. I gave it to my mother and she gave it away entirely.

The Story of the Christmas Bookcase (http://marianperera.blogspot.ca/2013/12/the-story-of-christmas-bookcase.html) (on my blog) is a tale of what might have been the best gift I'd ever received, if not for one small problem...

Karen Junker
10-19-2014, 01:30 AM
The year I was 8, my mom and dad gave all of us kids (I had 2 younger sibs) a set of encyclopedias, as a collective (and our only) gift. I was really upset and complained bitterly, because I had asked for a transistor radio.

My mother took me aside and explained to me that my father had saved all year for those books - and he was so proud to have been able to given them to us -- because when he was a child, the only book in their home (a cabin without electricy, running water or indoor lavatory) was a bible that had been passed down from his great-grandfather. It changed the way I looked at gifts, at giving, and at my father. Pretty dang good gift.

KarmaPolice
10-19-2014, 01:45 AM
Pretty much every gift I got from my parents were crappy ones. With (very) few exceptions, they fit into the following categories:

1/ Stuff you'd have to buy your kid anyway. Clothing for school, sensible shoes, boring stationary etc.

2/ Stuff that looked okay on first glance, but turned out to have a fault which meant it had to be sent back... and it never returned. Board games and electronics were the main ones.

3/ Stuff I had wanted... several years before. At 14 I got a Scalextric, which by then I hadn't wanted since 12.

4/ ...And just sheer crap. The kind that makes you wonder if they even know what age and gender you are. Books way below my reading level or really boring ones. Several footballs, despite the fact that I had zero skill or interest in it. Music / films suitable for a 7 year-old girl. A Noddy costume when I was 12.

Needless to say, we don't get on even now. Though it wasn't personal - my siblings got similar crap too.

The best? My first PC, bought second-hand by my Nan back in '98. Wasn't that good even at the time; Pentium 1, Windows 95, 32 MB RAM. But it was all mine, and it was my first.

Maggie Maxwell
10-19-2014, 02:29 AM
Not my own, but...

If you play video games, you probably know about Gamestop and their trade-in policy. Bring in a used stuff, get a teeny amount of money for another game. I worked there for three years. A few days after Christmas, a guy comes in with a large bag and says his grandparents got him some video game stuff he has no use or space for and wondered if he could trade it in. I opened the bag... and found it full of random things we gave away with purchases and preorders. We had a drawer full of leftovers of our own we sometimes let kids raid. We had to tell the poor guy that his grandparents raided a freebies drawer at their local store for his Christmas and that we couldn't give him a penny for any of it.

rhymegirl
10-19-2014, 02:44 AM
Wow, this is going along quite well.

Thank you for all the responses so far!

I guess this is a good topic.

Channy
10-19-2014, 03:34 AM
Two years ago, my mom kinda forgot so she whipped out some tiki-inspired whicker candle holders/set.. It was pretty until I noticed something, lifted one candle and found a dead baby mouse (http://imgur.com/rdNB0b2).

Buffysquirrel
10-19-2014, 04:02 AM
One year my husband's brother and his wife gave us the liqueur chocolates they'd received the previous year from another family member. The chocs hadn't done well in the meantime. Then they told us they were no longer giving or expecting gifts. Yet last year I saw the wife posting on FB about how her gift shopping was going. Uh huh?

Apart from that, one year my parents gave me a jumper in the colour of my school uniform (bottle green). I *hated* my school uniform.

Fruitbat
10-19-2014, 04:15 AM
Oh, that reminds me. One year my father gave me a box of chocolates. When I opened it, a bunch of moths flew out. He thought it was funny to give out chocolates but open the box and eat one before he wrapped, so maybe that was how it happened. :)

MaryMumsy
10-19-2014, 05:33 AM
Gifts from my parents were always pretty good, even as an adult, although some wouldn't think so. I'm sorry, but new dish towels were on my wish list. I bought myself some new ones this year, I hadn't had any new ones since my Mom died in 2004.

My MIL, on the other hand, didn't get it. It was always something I either didn't want or didn't need. And it got worse after my BIL got married. You could see the calculator going in his wife's head as the gifts were opened. MIL countered by giving us girls exactly the same thing (if it was clothing, in different colors) and giving the guys exactly the same thing.

About 15 years ago my gift from hubby was a new toilet. But I didn't complain, we needed it. And we tend to buy things for the house, if we buy gifts at all. We get things as we need or want them.

MM

L M Ashton
10-19-2014, 07:06 AM
A pen. Yep, that exciting. From my mother, who always gave me crappy gifts when I got them, which wasn't always. That particular year, one of my brothers got a briefcase, the other a toolbox (a good one, not a crappy one), and my sister a sewing machine, all gifts well over a hundred bucks each. Mine? Yeah...

shakeysix
10-19-2014, 07:49 AM
I was the oldest grandchild of 10. My sister was next oldest. Every Thanksgiving Day, from the time I was six and started to read until I was in high school, my maternal grandmother put my sister and me in charge of Christmas shopping for our brother and our 7 little cousins.

She would hand us each a pencil and a Christmas catalog--Montgomery Ward and Sears Roebuck. The baby always got a Jack in the Box for his first Christmas and there was always a baby, so we picked one out, circled it. The other kids could pick up to 6 toys. The toys had to come under the budget. My sister and I circled each child's choice and of course our own choices. Then put the child's name by it. Next we added up the cost and put it on a list for Grandma so she could tell Santa what to bring. Grandma didn't buy every choice. She had final say and if something wasn't safe or practical that was that. Our great grandmother gave each of us warm pajamas, a warm hat and mittens and a box of chocolate cherries. We got to pick them too, but not tell the little kids. Getting to help was the best gift because when the kids opened their gifts we were as excited as they were.

As we got older, we put a lot of effort into keeping the Santa secret going with the little kids. Grandma and Grandpa's gifts were even better than a surprise for my sister and me, because we knew what was coming but had no idea what it was really like, just a black and white catalog picture. I remember an ant farm, a telescope, a xylophone, a camera, and best of all a microscope. I spent all that Christmas Day trying to get a snowflake under my slide!

Some Christmases there was a 5$ limit per kid, others had a $3 limit, depending on how well the wheat and alfalfa harvests had gone. Incredible as it seems, $5 could buy a decent tricycle in the early fifties. Our dad, grandfather and uncles went pheasant hunting on Thanksgiving morning so the Christmas catalog chore was a perfect way to keep ten kids busy while Grandma and Great Grandma made T-giving dinner--s6

snafu1056
10-19-2014, 09:45 AM
The worst was just a mistake. I wanted a Star Wars book and they got me Star Trek instead. I like Star Trek too, so it wasn't that bad, but I was completely baffled when I opened it.

Also a Chia-pet, but that was a gag gift anyway.

Fruitbat
10-19-2014, 04:42 PM
My son got me some air freshener for my birthday once. He was young and trying to be thoughtful but it was hard not to laugh.

mrsmig
10-19-2014, 05:00 PM
My youngest sister once gave my husband and me a set of light switch plate covers in the shape of a Hamsa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamsa). Why she thought this would be a good gift I have no idea - the design had nothing to do with our lives, our interests or our decor, and was kind of ugly into the bargain. I laughed about it but when we unwrapped them it was definitely a WTF moment.

My husband gave me a cast-iron skillet as a stocking-stuffer surprise Christmas gift last year. My sister in law turned up her nose at it ("A skillet? For Christmas?"), but I love it. Different strokes.

Wilde_at_heart
10-19-2014, 06:20 PM
ETA @MM: - back in my 20s my room-mate/best friend at the time gave me a cast iron skillet for Christmas - I loved it and still have it!

My mother for the past few years has been giving away 'antiques' - i.e. stuff she no longer has any use for and is wanting to de-clutter.

So she gave my nephew (who has been vegan for many years!) a pair of ivory salad tongs. Because, well, vegans must eat lots of salad ... :facepalm:

Bolero
10-19-2014, 06:45 PM
Being given a present on my sibling's birthday. I was most taken aback when I was given a perfectly nice small present - good quality sort of jack-in-the-cone - pops up on a stick. Friends of the parents gave it to me. I thanked them but was puzzled, so I asked my mother quietly, and out of earshot, why I was getting a present when it wasn't my birthday. She explained that some children would be upset by not getting a present when their sibling was getting one. I was most hacked off that those people thought I was that kind of person.

Deb Kinnard
10-19-2014, 07:20 PM
Wow, lots of "worst" scenarios here, so I'll share one of my "best" stories.

It was 1956 and I was five. We lived in a two-flat apartment in Chicago at the time. My father did professional catalog photography and he was always bringing home toys for me to play with just for one night--the toys were merchandise, didn't belong to the photo studio, and had to go back in the morning. I loved playing with that stuff 6-8 months before it became available, but I didn't have any fuss over that then. They were just cool toys.

One was a drink-and-wet doll called Betsy Wetsy (I know--but this was the fifties). She came with all the gear--the clothing, the bottle, the diaper, the whole enchilada. I wanted her like whoa but the parents said, "No, too expensive."

You already know the punchline. She was under the tree, with the whole set of gear she came with. I have photos of that Christmas, with five-year-old me holding Betsy and beaming.

I played with that doll until she looked like she'd gone through both World Wars.

Like Ralphie in "The Christmas Story", she was the best Christmas present I had ever received or would ever receive.

Now my husband and I have "gifted" each other over the past 28 years with the same non-working cassette tape player. It broke years ago. We find weird ways to gift each other. One evening I wrapped it up as a birthday present, slipped it to our Mexican-restaurant waiter, and whispered to him in Spanish that this was something really brilliant for my husband's birthday, and would he please present it to him after the main course with the appropriate ceremony and panache?

My DH almost choked on his margarita when he opened it. Yes. I am evil.

stormie
10-19-2014, 09:12 PM
I do love dolls, though decidedly not the creepy ones (cracks down the face, crossed-eyes...). When I was a child, and one of four sisters,
we had plenty of dolls to play with.

Every few years, my parents would give us each a new doll, and they came in rectangular boxes. So I knew when I was getting a doll
if there was a rectangular-shaped present under the tree.

That was decades ago, and all but one doll from my childhood survived. One Christmas a few years ago, right after my parents passed away,
my husband handed me a long rectangular box, nicely wrapped. It brought back a flood of memories but...a doll?!

I laughed and said, "A doll, right?"
He looked stunned. He asked how I knew. Now it was my turn to be stunned.

He had won the doll in a raffle. It was new and one of those collector's dolls,
dressed in a winter Victorian outfit.

I cried. It was the best gift ever.

stormie
10-19-2014, 09:31 PM
And here's my worst:

My SIL had received a lot of bowls and dishes for her wedding. My MIL rewrapped one of the boxes of plates
and gave it to my husband and me. When we got home, I noticed an odd smell coming from the box.

When I opened it, there was a tiny dead mouse in the bottom corner.

My MIL never did like me.

Bloo
10-20-2014, 06:44 AM
I'll share a couple of stories.

This is going to sound weird, but the best present I got, the one I still ask for to this day and still baffles my parents was...a box of meat.

It wasn't my first apartment or I had just moved out or anything, so I don't know what prompted my parents to do it-maybe my love of cooking? Anyway, they went to a local butcher and got a box of different kinds of meat; steaks, hand cut bacon, pork chops, sausage, hamburgers, chicken, etc. All locally raised and butchered. At first glance I was like "it's a box of meat." But I treasured that box and would take great care in taking the time to cook and prepare it because it was limited supply. I would plan menus on my days off around that box of meat in my freezer.

I still get meat LOL but not at the level as that present, one of the best.

Another one, a couple of years ago, I lost my job as a hotel manager just before Christmas, wasn't collecting unemployment and actually moved back into my parents basement just after Thanksgiving (I had about 2 months before I moved to a different town to go back to college). My dad pulled me aside and said, "I know you don't have any money for Christmas presents for your brother and sister, here take this." and he slipped me a $100 to spend on them. Not really a present per se but just something genuine and nice.

Kashmirgirl1976
10-20-2014, 07:02 AM
Best: My son born twenty-three days prior.

Worst: A regifted dvd player my husband got from his office Christmas party.

rhymegirl
10-20-2014, 05:53 PM
Wow, lots of "worst" scenarios here, so I'll share one of my "best" stories.

It was 1956 and I was five. We lived in a two-flat apartment in Chicago at the time. My father did professional catalog photography and he was always bringing home toys for me to play with just for one night--the toys were merchandise, didn't belong to the photo studio, and had to go back in the morning. I loved playing with that stuff 6-8 months before it became available, but I didn't have any fuss over that then. They were just cool toys.

One was a drink-and-wet doll called Betsy Wetsy (I know--but this was the fifties). She came with all the gear--the clothing, the bottle, the diaper, the whole enchilada. I wanted her like whoa but the parents said, "No, too expensive."

You already know the punchline. She was under the tree, with the whole set of gear she came with. I have photos of that Christmas, with five-year-old me holding Betsy and beaming.
I played with that doll until she looked like she'd gone through both World Wars.
Like Ralphie in "The Christmas Story", she was the best Christmas present I had ever received or would ever receive.

Great story! And I remember Betsy Wetsy! I was a wee one in the fifties.

rhymegirl
10-20-2014, 06:03 PM
And here's my worst:
My SIL had received a lot of bowls and dishes for her wedding. My MIL rewrapped one of the boxes of plates
and gave it to my husband and me. When we got home, I noticed an odd smell coming from the box.
When I opened it, there was a tiny dead mouse in the bottom corner.
My MIL never did like me.

Ewww. I can see why that would be your worst gift.
I normally shake out empty boxes that have been sitting in my cellar for a while before I use them to wrap gifts. I'm generally looking for bugs that might have crawled into the boxes. But I've never come across a dead mouse.

stormie
10-20-2014, 06:10 PM
How that mouse crawled in, I don't know, or if it was before she wrapped it (she's cooked outdated food that smells and we've gotten sick) or after she wrapped it and stored it for Christmas. There was probably a tiny hole in the bottom corner. She kept all sorts of things in her mice-and squirrel infested third floor attic area, or the basement. Just had my husband put the entire box in a large trash bag and dump it all in the outside trash can.

That was a Christmas to remember. And not fondly.

Lavern08
10-20-2014, 06:34 PM
...And just sheer crap. The kind that makes you wonder if they even know what age and gender you are.
I apologize, but that ^ statement made me (literally) LOL :D

JimmyB27
10-20-2014, 06:56 PM
Only thing that springs to mind is the best and worst - last year's Kindle from my parents.
Best because, duh, it's a Kindle. Worst because of how my book spending has sky-rocketed since I got it. :P

Shakesbear
10-20-2014, 06:57 PM
Does Hanukkah count? Not very often but now and then my paternal grandfather liked to have a bet on the horses. It infuriated my grandmother who thought he was throwing his money away. One year he had a big win. There were five grandchildren and he gave us 44 each. That totalled 220, roughly 3000 today. Why 44 - because that is how many candles are lit during Hanukkah.
Worst present? As a teacher I was given gifts by my tutor group and also by individual pupils. Worst, from an individual pupil, was a plastic rose 'tree' that lit up and changed colour. It looked like a bramble plant and the rose was a blob. I kept it on my desk until the battery died.

thedark
10-20-2014, 07:04 PM
I had Christmas when I was a little kid, but when I was about nine, all holidays and birthdays were forbidden.

But when I was thirteen, and my brother was fifteen, I wanted to do something special for him on his birthday, because I was the only one who remembered, or knew.

For the six months beforehand, I'd saved the little circular hole punches you get from your office hole puncher. Squirreled them away in a little ziplock bag and hid it in the walls. Two weeks beforehand, I slipped a single match and the stub of a well-used candle into my sleeve. And two days beforehand, I got my hands on a cupcake and hid it in the very back of one of the refrigerators, right behind a bloody lamb's head (It was in a bag, at least. The cupcake.)

In the middle of the night on his birthday, I tiptoed across ten thousand square feet of building and found his room. Woke my brother up, tossed confetti on him and curled up on his bed, eating half a cupcake and whispering about all birthdays we'd one day have in the light.

I've never had a better birthday, or been closer to my sibling.

No present, but it didn't matter to him, or to me.

I still smile when I empty out my hole puncher, all these years later. And yes, it took us like an hour to clean all the confetti off his bed. :)

~ Anna

kuwisdelu
10-20-2014, 08:02 PM
My husband gave me a cast-iron skillet as a stocking-stuffer surprise Christmas gift last year. My sister in law turned up her nose at it ("A skillet? For Christmas?"), but I love it. Different strokes.

How do you fit a cast iron skillet in a stocking?

And without taking the stocking down with it?

shakeysix
10-20-2014, 09:51 PM
The best student Christmas gift my husband ever received came from an eleven year old: five quarters taped into a hand made card that read "Have a beer on me, Mr. Smith." He laughed and laughed over that. I still have it in my desk at home--s6

stormie
10-20-2014, 10:19 PM
How do you fit a cast iron skillet in a stocking?

And without taking the stocking down with it?
Little skillet, big stocking, heavy-duty hanger?

Matchu
10-21-2014, 03:12 AM
A huge oblong parcel, red wrapped in happy santas. Admittedly my brother-in law was twenty years old but I was very envious, certain this package all ready and waiting for him contained a last train set from his daddy or a hi-fi deck for college. It was a trouser press. Sad for him - from my perspective, but the family were very conventional so to them it was an extremely useful gift.

chompers
10-21-2014, 04:06 AM
No present, but it didn't matter to him, or to me.


It's the thought that counts, and you more than made up for it in spades. Thanks for sharing such a lovely memory.

rhymegirl
10-24-2014, 02:43 AM
Any more Best Christmas gifts? I think I have lots of "worst" here.

And thank you to everyone for your responses!

Deb Kinnard
10-25-2014, 02:29 AM
In adulthood? A beautiful gold Celtic cross pendant from a museum-type catalog. I coveted it but never told my husband. Gold wasn't $1700 per ounce then, but it was pricey enough, which is why I never mentioned it to him.

He knew anyway. It appeared in my stocking. Twenty years later (today), I'm still wearing it, I rarely take it off.

mellymel
10-25-2014, 05:21 AM
I feel terrible for saying this but it was a gift from one of my Kindergarten students many years ago. It was a glass figurine of, what looked like, a cockroach. It even had antennae. It could have been a shrimp I suppose, but it was brown and REALLY looked like a roach. I have a really BAD fear of roaches, so for me it was the worse thing I could have every gotten. I opened the box and then because the child was watching me, I pretended it was amazing, closed the box, put it to the side and gave him a hug. I told him thank you so much and when all the kids left, it went in the garbage. I know it seems so mean, but a roach? Really? It couldn't have been a...a...frog? Or a dragonfly, or...or ANYTHING else??? *feels like a mean schmucky schmuck*

ETA: Oh, I just saw your post that you had enough bad ones. Can't think of best right now. Will have to think on that one.

mrsmig
10-25-2014, 05:30 AM
How do you fit a cast iron skillet in a stocking?

And without taking the stocking down with it?


Little skillet, big stocking, heavy-duty hanger?

Full size Lodge skillet. :D

Since there's just the two of us, we go a little overboard on our Christmas stockings. The stockings are chock full and there are usually a couple of presents that get laid alongside them because they won't/can't fit. We don't have a place to hang our stockings so we put them on either end of the sofa.

Foolonthehill
10-27-2014, 03:57 PM
Probably my best Christmas present was from my husband. A music "box" in she shape of a theatre. It played (plays) the nutcracker suite and has four different rotating scenes with moving ballerinas, dancers and all kinds of figurines appearing at intervals after the curtains are mechanically drawn and re-opened.

Foolonthehill
10-27-2014, 04:03 PM
But I'll add a worst one anyway. WE were brought up in Italy and a Scottish aunt thought that we might appreciate jumpers with Italian writing on them, that it might be trendy as it was at one point or maybe still is the UK (Italian fashion brands etc). She once sent one over to my teenaged sister and the writing on it translated as complete nonsense, literally.... ALL HENS.....

jaksen
10-27-2014, 04:55 PM
Sometimes the best present is to find something that the receiver always wanted, but never got, as a child. It might seem silly to give a grown man a fully-functioning Lionel train set, but that's what I gave my husband on our first (married) Christmas. (His family was very poor; he sometimes received nothing but some candy and oranges in his Christmas stocking.)

He got Lincoln logs the next Christmas. We actually sat and played with both under the tree. (We were in our mid-twenties at the time.)

Now my grandsons play with the train and the Lincoln logs and there is a story behind both.

Red-Green
10-27-2014, 07:13 PM
My worst present is the same as my best present. A guy I was dating gave me a boxer puppy for Christmas. Worst present ever! A puppy? 12 weeks old, not house trained, not anything trained. She peed everywhere, ate the arm off my couch, plus a pair of shoes.

Now, she's 4 years old and she is absolutely my beloved. She is sweet and attentive and friendly and bravely gets up in the night to bark when drunk college boys stagger through my yard (and sometimes knock on my door.) Everyone who meets her comments on how sweet and beautiful she is. Best Christmas present ever!

Wicked
10-28-2014, 11:52 PM
I hate Christmas. A lot.
Every year it depresses me more and more.

A few years ago a family in our community lost their grandmother when her car went off the road and she tried to walk home in a blizzard.

So I asked my husband to give me the money he would have blown buying a bunch of stuff I didn't need, and help me shop for the family. We got together with a few other people, and played secret Santa.

Since then it's become a bit of tradition. I pick someone who seems a bit more alone, or more in need of a pick me up than I am, and I send them an unexpected present.

Sometimes all I can afford is a tin of candy, but being able to do it is the best present I get all year.

Deb Kinnard
10-29-2014, 06:06 PM
I hear you, Wicked. As my kids began to outgrow toys, I asked them to help me shop for Toys for Tots instead of buying them a lot of stuff, and they were chuffed to pick toys they'd like to have had when they were younger. I think it was also an indirect way to teach them about the satisfaction in giving back.

lastlittlebird
10-30-2014, 01:58 AM
The best present I ever got was also a puppy. We had just moved to the other side of the country when I was about 11 or 12 and my parents had promised I could get a puppy as compensation. We went and picked one from a litter on Christmas Eve and I was told that I could come back and get him after New Years.
Apparently I was so excited about the idea of getting a puppy that I didn't notice there was one in a box in the van with us on the ride home.
I was woken that morning by barking and my sweet boy spent about fourteen years with us. Best dog ever, best present ever.

As for the worst. I can't really think of a interestingly bad one that I've received personally, but mum told me a story about one a while ago.

My mother was given a dressing gown by her FIL with her first name embroidered on it one Christmas.
Dad's brother's wife was given the exact same dressing gown with "X's wife" embroidered on it.
Dad's family wasn't really very good at subtlety.

rhymegirl
10-30-2014, 07:37 PM
Thank you for all your responses. The editor okayed the story idea.

I want to reiterate here that if you post here I am looking for quotes so I will need your real name and location.

I will ask you privately for that info.

Qui Amat Scribere
11-03-2014, 06:51 AM
Well, the year before last, one of my aunts, who could charitably be called 'thrifty', gave me one of those plastic deviled-egg trays and a package of dollar-store brand muffin mix. The muffin mix was expired and had a small hole in one bottom corner, which had been sealed up again with Scotch tape. As for the egg holder, I LOATHE deviled eggs, and have since childhood.

Needless to say it was worth it for the laugh.