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jclarkdawe
10-18-2014, 03:32 PM
Police officer, who is former US marine, it talking with a civilian former marine, and the police officer vehemently disagrees with some of his Chief's policies. Police officer was an specialist in the Marines and saw combat. Chief was a Lieutenant in the Army and pushed a desk.

Civilian that the police officer is talking to is very good at getting people to relax and say things they shouldn't. Response can be obscene, but needs to be clearly nasty as well as inappropriate for the police officer to say.

Thanks for any help. And rep points sent for all answers.

Jim Clark-Dawe

alleycat
10-18-2014, 03:41 PM
I know a lot more insults from army guys to marines since I grew up next to a huge army base.

I wonder if grunt or fucking grunt would work. "Once a grunt, always a fucking grunt."

An old one is "They start off green and then turn yellow."

The army guys used to call the Air Force the Chair Force; you might be able to do something with that since your target is a desk jockey (desk jockey might also work).

Chase
10-18-2014, 04:23 PM
Sorry, most of the best insults I know are from army guys (like me) to marine guys (like my little brother):

1. Marines are terrible marksmen. I once saw an angry marine throw himself to the ground . . . and miss.

2. Call the marines when it absolutely, positively needs to be FUBAR by tomorrow.

3. Army guy doing marine impressions . . .
Marine in combat: Confused expression with hands in the air.
Marine mine sweeper: Eyes closed, fingers in ears, probing the ground in front with one foot.

4. They're still looking for a few good men.

Cathy C
10-18-2014, 04:42 PM
How about this one:

An Army guy and a Marine guy are at a shooting range and the Army guy is disappointed with his score. He looks at the target and say, "Wow, this is terrible. I should shoot myself." The Marine looks at the target and says, "Better reload. I think you'll need more than one bullet."

Magnanimoe
10-18-2014, 05:56 PM
I spent 6 years in the Marines. I believe we referred to them as Dogs, Doggies, Joes, or G.I. Joes. In this case, however, it might be more important that one saw combat and the other was "rear echelon" or a "desk jockey." If the police officer was an enlisted man, that could also make a huge difference in his attitude. We enlisted guys called officers "zeroes," a reference to the letter "O" in front of their rank (O1=second lieutenant) as opposed to the letter "E" (E1=private). The wall between officers and enlisted is huge.

Snowstorm
10-18-2014, 06:48 PM
Here's my offering, Jim: When I was in I took to calling a LT a "chock." Put him behind a vehicle tire then he'll be good for something.

ClareGreen
10-19-2014, 01:14 AM
There's always the ancient (and eternal) REMF. Rear Echelon ahemahem.

redfalcon
10-19-2014, 01:44 AM
We called them Chairborne Rangers or Pogues. I was in the Army, I'm not sure what the jar heads called them.


How do you keep a Marine in suspense?

badwolf.usmc
10-19-2014, 04:04 AM
Marines usually don't insult Army guys, it's like insulting your little brother who looks up to you like a hero. They'll get there some day.

grayworld
10-19-2014, 04:32 AM
Something along these lines?

Officer: "My Chief is a REMF [Or insult of your choice]."

Civilian: "I didn't want to say it, but he sounds like a(n) [expletive of your choice here]"

Officer: "Call him 'Sir.' He doesn't work for a living."

A play on "Don't call me 'sir,' I work for a living." An enlisted-on-enlisted insult. Actually used that line in one of my books :)

shakeysix
10-19-2014, 05:19 AM
According to my father--a marine who saw action in the South Pacific during ww2-- in a public situation if a group pf army guys spotted marines, they would split into two groups. One group would ask "What's the color of horseshit?" The others would holler "Marine Green!"

Regardless of how outnumbered they were, dad and his buddies would arrive slugging and a pleasant time was had by all. I remember my Army Air Corps g-father. Dad's father-in-law, asking the same question at family picnics, while they were pitching horseshoes, all in fun of course. --s6

jclarkdawe
10-20-2014, 03:26 PM
Scene is still in the rough draft stage, but this is how it's going:


He gets out of his cruiser, adjusts his hat, then his belt, and struts towards me. Definitely into fitness, and more the weight building-type and not the lean runner. About thirty, it’s hard to decide whether his head is shaved or the crew cut is that short. On his right forearm, I notice “Semper Fi,” with a Marine anchor tattoo. “You know you can’t hitchhike here,” he barks.

No politeness and definitely a guy who likes to bust people, probably not caring whether it’s a real charge or not. He’s going to ask for my ID and he’s going to run it through the computer. When the Feds start searching for me, which is going to be sooner rather then later when they realize they’re not getting that two million, they’ll be within a three hundred miles of where I don’t want them to be. That’s a lot closer then I want. I want them to think I fell off the ends of the Earth. In real terms, I can use any site within an eight hundred mile radius of DC, but I’ve got a very good location already, and I don’t want to waste time scouting a new location.

I can feel the tension rising in me, and struggle not to show it. Cops pounce on stress like a cat on a mouse, and I don’t want to be a mouse. “Oorah, Sir!” The Marine battle cry. “I’m sorry, I thought I was okay here.” I stand at attention.

“Marine?”

“Yes, Sir. Four years. Second Marine.” Yeah, no way was I in the military. But if he buys that I’m a fellow Marine, then maybe he’ll forget to ask for my ID. No salute though. He doesn’t look like officer material.

“Sorry about that. My Chief doesn’t want people hitch-hiking in town. Says it creates the wrong image. So I have to hassle anybody hitching.” He looks around like he’s worried his Chief is glaring over his shoulder. “Mind riding in the back? I’ll take you up to the next exit. Solves my Chief’s issue. Guy is a want-to-be Marine who was a zero chair jockey in the Army. He’s a dick to work for.” The cop is holding the door open to his cruiser. Thanks for all the help.

Jim Clark-Dawe

badwolf.usmc
10-20-2014, 04:50 PM
Scene is still in the rough draft stage, but this is how it's going:
Thanks for all the help.
Jim Clark-Dawe

A few notes:
1: “Second Marine” refers to the regiment, not division, and the proper way to cite them is “Second Marines”; plural form not singular.

2: Marines identify themselves by the battalion they were with, not the division. For example, I’m with CLB-25 (Combat Logistics Battalion 25). Second Marine division is divided into several Regiments, so just pick a battalion within that regiment. Also, battalion numbers are not linear so you just can’t pick a battalion number. So, a battalion within second Marine division is third battalion, second Marines. The proper way to show that is 3/2, or three-two. Example:

“Who were you with?” Frank asked as he sipped on the beer.
“Three-two,” Stan replied, “I bounced between Kilo and Lima companies.”
“To the Bastards,” Frank said as he raised his beer. Stan grunted in agreement and clanked beers with him.

3: Don’t stand at attention, a Marine would only do that to be a smartass.

4: Marines hate posers, it pisses them off. Most Marines can spot a poser pretty easy. With that said, Marines who are out of the military tend to be pretty relaxed with other branches, so that Cop would help out your main character no matter what his branch is.

alleycat
10-20-2014, 05:00 PM
I still think you could do something with the desk jockey part.

"Yeah, when he was in the service he manned the assault stapler. I heard he got the Purple Heart for a paper cut."

jclarkdawe
10-20-2014, 05:59 PM
Alleycat -- I like the assault stapler and paper cut Purple Heart. Makes him much nastier.




A few notes:
1: “Second Marine” refers to the regiment, not division, and the proper way to cite them is “Second Marines”; plural form not singular.

2: Marines identify themselves by the battalion they were with, not the division. For example, I’m with CLB-25 (Combat Logistics Battalion 25). Second Marine division is divided into several Regiments, so just pick a battalion within that regiment. Also, battalion numbers are not linear so you just can’t pick a battalion number. So, a battalion within second Marine division is third battalion, second Marines. The proper way to show that is 3/2, or three-two. Example:

“Who were you with?” Frank asked as he sipped on the beer.
“Three-two,” Stan replied, “I bounced between Kilo and Lima companies.”
“To the Bastards,” Frank said as he raised his beer. Stan grunted in agreement and clanked beers with him. Thank you and will change.

3: Don’t stand at attention, a Marine would only do that to be a smartass. Yeah, I've got to improve that. Cops like people who stand in a respectful position and that's more what I'm thinking of here.

4: Marines hate posers, it pisses them off. Most Marines can spot a poser pretty easy. With that said, Marines who are out of the military tend to be pretty relaxed with other branches, so that Cop would help out your main character no matter what his branch is. This is a cop who doesn't help much of anyone else. He's a dick. Cops that tend to hassle hitchhikers don't tend to like to help people. Good cops help the hitchhiker solve the problem or ignore them if there's no problem. This cop usually makes hitchhikers walk to the next exit (4 miles away).

The character is a good poser. He says just enough to get some bait on the hook and then lets the other guy hook himself. A good conman knows that say a little, and then let the other guy talk.

Thanks for all the help.

Jim

badwolf.usmc
10-20-2014, 06:50 PM
Thanks for all the help.

Jim

NP.

Lol, I don't know why I missed it the first time but the technical term for that "Marine Anchor" is an EGA (Eagle, Globe, Anchor). Ironically, I have one on my right forearm, the same as your Cop character. Some people recognize it as Marines, others ask if I was in the Army or Navy, but almost everyone recognizes it as a military tattoo of some kind.

In the Marines, we have this thing called "Parade Rest". It's kinda like standing at attention, but instead of your feet together and your hands at your side, your feet are shoulder width apart and your hands are together either behind or in front of you. It is considered the relaxed, but respectful, way to to talk to someone more senior than you. Many Marines go to this when talking to someone senior without thinking about it, and it can be an indicator that someone is a Marine, or former Marine.

Snowstorm
10-20-2014, 07:42 PM
"Yeah, when he was in the service he manned the assault stapler. I heard he got the Purple Heart for a paper cut."

*cleans up snorted coffee off my screen* Bolding mine. Now, that's funny!

WeaselFire
10-20-2014, 08:53 PM
Classics I remember over the years:

"I'd rather have my baby sister walking the street than marrying an Army puke."

"No wonder we're always first in and last out and you guys haul the supplies."

"Pretty much all he can be."

"Marines are hitting the beach while the Army is waiting in the barracks."

These were all referring to regular Army troops. The Marines are pretty much in awe of the Delta Force guys and are pals with the Rangers.

Jeff

jclarkdawe
10-21-2014, 05:23 PM
My character would know it was a Marine anchor (he notices that sort of thing) but would not know its proper name. Tats can provide a lot of information about who you are.

Parade rest was the position I was thinking of, and which I have now sort of described. I have to decide whether my character would know the name, as opposed to knowing the position. Parade rest is actually used by a lot of people who aren't ex-military. A lot of cons sort of use it in talking to correction officials and police. It's sort of sub-conscious but helps defuse the situation.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

grayworld
10-25-2014, 07:58 AM
Scene is still in the rough draft stage, but this is how it's going:

Thanks for all the help.

Jim Clark-Dawe

I was just an Army puke, but I worked with the USMC on many occasions. I don't remember Marines referring to themselves as Marines. It was always "Corpsman" when referring to a fellow Marine and "The Corps" when referring to the Marines in general.

I'm sure badwolf.usmc can set the record straight, and I'm probably splitting hairs, but it was always "Corps" and "Corpsman" among the Marines when I was in the service a decade or so ago.

I'd change the line "Marine?" to "Corpsman?" That's it.

Drachen Jager
10-25-2014, 10:19 AM
This doesn't directly relate, but might help you somewhere along the line. When I was in the Army, I heard this joke:

Army corporal uses the washroom, goes to leave, a Naval officer says, "In the Navy, they teach us to wash after we piss."

Corporal replies, "Sir, in the Army they teach us not to piss on our hands."

badwolf.usmc
10-26-2014, 05:11 AM
I was just an Army puke, but I worked with the USMC on many occasions. I don't remember Marines referring to themselves as Marines. It was always "Corpsman" when referring to a fellow Marine and "The Corps" when referring to the Marines in general.

I'm sure badwolf.usmc can set the record straight, and I'm probably splitting hairs, but it was always "Corps" and "Corpsman" among the Marines when I was in the service a decade or so ago.

I'd change the line "Marine?" to "Corpsman?" That's it.

Like many things in the military, it varies from unit to unit.

With that said, I don't know of any Marines that call each other Corpsman. A Corpsman is a naval rate which is assigned to Marine units; they are like Army medics. A Navy Corpsman must go through training to work with the Navy, then additional training to work with Marines.