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CathleenT
10-06-2014, 02:20 AM
I thank all the good punctuation faeries in advance.

A line from my current WIP (actually two, the first is to put it in context, in case that matters):

"You might want to save some [popcorn] to make garlands for your tree," Dad said.

"Yes, that too," I replied. [Comma after that?]

I normally put a comma after the word preceding 'too.' But it looked odd to me this time. I've put it in and taken it out several times now. Word doesn't seem to care.

:Shrug:

Osulagh
10-06-2014, 02:22 AM
Say, "Yes, that, too," and tell me that pause sounds natural or as intended.

Doesn't to me.

King Neptune
10-06-2014, 02:25 AM
I know what you mean, but it would look odd to have another comma. I think you should leave it as it is. It wouldn't be wrong to add a comma, but "that" and "too" go together.

Marlys
10-06-2014, 02:36 AM
Yeah, it's because you include the "yes" as part of the sentence--that makes another comma look (and sound) wrong after "that."

You might just break it into two utterances:

"Yes," I replied. "That, too."

CathleenT
10-06-2014, 02:50 AM
Perhaps more context would be useful.

"You might want to save some to make garlands for your tree," Dad said.

"Yes, that too," I replied. "Would you like some more to eat?"

Do you think putting the dialogue tag after yes would work in this instance? (I agree that it's the bomb-proof way to handle the problem.)

King Neptune
10-06-2014, 03:19 AM
If you feel uncertain, thne you might just rewrite the exchange to eliminate that line.

Maryn
10-06-2014, 03:53 AM
Be aware, too, that at some publishers, house style now eliminates the comma before a sentence-ending too. It takes some getting used to, too.

Maryn, trying to be funny while truthful

Chase
10-06-2014, 04:12 AM
I normally put a comma after the word preceding 'too.' But it looked odd to me this time.

Many eliminate the comma after trailing adverbs because they wrongly think they have something to do with pauses or speaking. They do not.

Commas are a structural aid to reading. I'm like you, Cathleen. I normally include them, too. :D So I'd find a way for consistency. I like the one Marlys suggested. Here's a couple more:

"Yes. That, too," I replied.

"Yes . . . that, too," I replied.

Osulagh
10-06-2014, 04:35 AM
"You might want to save some to make garlands for your tree," Dad said.

"Yes, that too," I replied. "Would you like some more to eat?"

I think this as it is, is best.

"Yes, that, too." stresses too many pauses.

"Yes that too." is too quick.

"Yes that, too." is just awkward.

"Yes, that too." while doesn't stress a pause between "that" and "too" makes the saying more fluid and natural.


My second choice would be Marlys' "Yes," I replied. "That, too." as the dialogue tag implies a pause, rather than enforcing one.

blacbird
10-06-2014, 04:49 AM
No comma.

caw

Bufty
10-06-2014, 01:17 PM
Another for no comma. It's so short the meaning is obvious without it.

Ken
10-06-2014, 03:53 PM
No comma. No 'yes.'

"You might want to save some to make garlands for your tree," Dad said.

"That too," I replied.

Jamesaritchie
10-06-2014, 09:22 PM
Say, "Yes, that, too," and tell me that pause sounds natural or as intended.

Doesn't to me.

You should never, ever use or omit a comma based on a pause, or whether it sounds natural. There are specific rules for comma use, and none of them involves how it sounds.

Jamesaritchie
10-06-2014, 09:23 PM
Yes, use a comma. It belongs there.

Chase
10-06-2014, 10:26 PM
You should never, ever use or omit a comma based on a pause, or whether it sounds natural. There are specific rules for comma use, and none of them involves how it sounds.
Hear, hear! See, see!


Yes, use a comma. It belongs there.

James is spot on. Despite the noisy bandwagon to cut commas with structural purposes, it's always correct to place a comma before trailing adverbs. Too is only one. Others include also, then, and however.

ArtsyAmy
10-07-2014, 10:34 PM
Perhaps more context would be useful.

"You might want to save some to make garlands for your tree," Dad said.

"Yes, that too," I replied. "Would you like some more to eat?"



To me, with or without the comma before "too," the sentence's meaning is unclear (even with the context you've included). (Maybe seeing it in more context would change that.) I'm not sure why your character would reply in that way to what Dad said, or why the character would then ask if Dad would like some more [popcorn?] to eat. What does "too" mean in this sentence? That is, in addition to what? Should the character save some popcorn for garlands in addition to saving some for some other thing, like, I dunno, caramel-popcorn balls (sounds yummy)? Does it mean popcorn should be saved for making garlands and for eating later? But if that's the case, I'm not sure why the character would ask Dad if he wants more [popcorn?] to eat [now?]. Depending on what the meaning is, perhaps this would work:

"Yes, for that, too," I replied.

Maybe look into rewording the passage for clarity, and the comma issue will disappear?

Hope you find something that works for your story. :)

Roxxsmom
10-08-2014, 09:33 AM
As far as I know, you only need to put a comma before too if it represents an abrupt change of thought.

http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/when-use-comma-too?page=all (http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/when-use-comma-too?page=all)

BethS
10-08-2014, 03:58 PM
Perhaps more context would be useful.

"You might want to save some to make garlands for your tree," Dad said.

"Yes, that too," I replied. "Would you like some more to eat?"

Do you think putting the dialogue tag after yes would work in this instance? (I agree that it's the bomb-proof way to handle the problem.)

Why not drop the "yes" entirely? It's not necessary. In fact, looks like the dialogue tag could go, too.