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Dennis E. Taylor
09-07-2014, 01:11 AM
As the title says. I'm not just concerned about possible medical issues -- I'm also wondering about discomfort issues.

The protagonist is female, pregnant, and a knowledgeable horse owner and rider, so I'm wondering when she might say enough.

Me, I'm pretty sure I know which end of a horse is the front.

cornflake
09-07-2014, 01:15 AM
As the title says. I'm not just concerned about possible medical issues -- I'm also wondering about discomfort issues.

The protagonist is female, pregnant, and a knowledgeable horse owner and rider, so I'm wondering when she might say enough.

Me, I'm pretty sure I know which end of a horse is the front.

When she feels like it? How could there be an answer to when a women would not feel like doing something? It'll be totally individual from X months to not at all.

stephenf
09-07-2014, 01:18 AM
Hi , not sure I understand your post , but the basic answer can only be ,when she wants to .

Quickbread
09-07-2014, 01:30 AM
I get what you're asking. At what point would it be uncomfortable for her, right? Here are some first-hand experiences: http://horseandstylemag.com/editorial/ride-ride-pregnant-equestrian.html

Mr Flibble
09-07-2014, 01:32 AM
Personally? No problem up to about five months or so. After six I started getting a big ol' penguin waddle going on :D So it got a bit uncomfortable with the bump.

ETA Although the whole "need to pee every two minutes" in the first few months was a drag!

Anna Spargo-Ryan
09-07-2014, 01:52 AM
Women used to ride horseback to bring on abortion, didn't they? I think something to do with the jostling motion can cause placental abruption. Not sure how likely it is, but it would be a theoretical risk from as soon as there was a placenta, I guess!

shaldna
09-07-2014, 02:26 AM
As the title says. I'm not just concerned about possible medical issues -- I'm also wondering about discomfort issues.

The protagonist is female, pregnant, and a knowledgeable horse owner and rider, so I'm wondering when she might say enough.

Me, I'm pretty sure I know which end of a horse is the front.

I stopped riding when it became too difficult to get my fat ass into the saddle -about 8 months or so.

Although I feel the need to point out that I didn't know I was pregnant until I was about 5 months (didn't skip periods, didn't gain weight, no other signs etc, and incidently Ihad been out eventing two days before I found out and had fallen off. I had also been giving a trampolining lesson on the day I found out, but that is by the by)

For the record, I owned (still do) a bit of a tempermental TB who didn;t like to stand still. I stopped jumping and doing cross-country, but i kept riding.

In truth I was more uncomfortable AFTER the baby - it was months before I was back in the saddle.

Cyia
09-07-2014, 02:37 AM
I'm very tempted to say "during labor."

However, I would imagine it depends on several factors including, age, health, time period, occupation, location, etc. If she's a modern NYC trust fund baby, who only rides on weekends for fun, she'd likely stop long before someone in rural Arizona who lives and works on a ranch.

Larry M
09-07-2014, 03:25 AM
This is a story of a pregnant woman that took one too many horseback rides.

In Scotland in 1316, an 18 (or possibly 19) -year-old pregnant woman named Marjorie Bruce went riding by herself. Somewhere along the road, something spooked the horse and Marjorie was thrown to the ground, suffering fatal injuries. As she lay dying, a passerby came to her aid and delivered her baby - a boy she named Robert, just before she died.

That woman was the daughter of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland. Her only child became Robert II Stewart, and became King in 1371. Had Robert died along with his mother, the course of Scottish and English history would have been quite different - all because a pregnant woman decided to go horseback riding.

Mr Flibble
09-07-2014, 03:44 AM
Women used to ride horseback to bring on abortion, didn't they?

They almost certainly failed, unless the pregnancy would have ended in miscarriage anyway.

The only problem (as noted above) is if you take a tumble.

cornflake
09-07-2014, 03:52 AM
This is a story of a pregnant woman that took one too many horseback rides.

In Scotland in 1316, an 18 (or possibly 19) -year-old pregnant woman named Marjorie Bruce went riding by herself. Somewhere along the road, something spooked the horse and Marjorie was thrown to the ground, suffering fatal injuries. As she lay dying, a passerby came to her aid and delivered her baby - a boy she named Robert, just before she died.

That woman was the daughter of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland. Her only child became Robert II Stewart, and became King in 1371. Had Robert died along with his mother, the course of Scottish and English history would have been quite different - all because a pregnant woman decided to go horseback riding.

I don't know how you meant this, but it reads uhm, badly.

If the same woman had dared to decide to go outside and ride a horse before that and been thrown, perhaps she wouldn't have become pregnant at all.

What if Robert Stewart had gone horseback riding, been thrown, and been fatally injured? The course of history would've been quite different, all because a man decided to go horseback riding.

I mean what's your point? Women should spend nine months in a cotton-wool sling, never leaving the house, because they lose the right to their own agency once pregnant? What if the house falls down?

Cath
09-07-2014, 03:58 AM
Careful folks. This is story research, not P&CE. Let's focus on answering the OP's question.

Larry, I haven't heard that tale before - do you have a source?

Larry M
09-07-2014, 04:41 AM
I mean what's your point?

My point is clearly stated in the first line of my post (in response to the OP's question: "At what point would a pregnant woman stop horseback riding?"


This is a story of a pregnant woman that took one too many horseback rides.

Your 'what if's' are pointless. My post presents a simple story of one woman that should not have gone riding.


Larry, I haven't heard that tale before - do you have a source?

Three sources that tell the story (there are others; print sources are given in some):

Cairn with plaque to Marjory Bruce (http://womenofscotland.org.uk/memorials/cairn-plaque-marjory-bruce) (source indicates Robert was born posthumously; other sources state she was alive when she gave birth).

Marjorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland (http://thefreelancehistorywriter.com/2013/09/28/marjorie-bruce-princess-of-scotland/)

The Stewart Society - History of the Stewarts (http://www.stewartsociety.org/history-of-the-stewarts.cfm?section=famous-stewarts&subcatid=16&histid=140)

Dennis E. Taylor
09-07-2014, 04:42 AM
Thanks all. The obvious answer is "when she feels like it," but that begs the question of when she might feel like it. At least now I have a reasonable range to work within. It'll also have to be modified by how much she pays attention to her BF, whose head is about to explode.

cornflake
09-07-2014, 06:11 AM
My point is clearly stated in the first line of my post (in response to the OP's question: "At what point would a pregnant woman stop horseback riding?"

First, his question was about personal comfort. Second, I don't understand what your answer would be, or why it'd be that.


Your 'what if's' are pointless. My post presents a simple story of one woman that should not have gone riding.

She shouldn't have gone riding because she was thrown? That's like 'you shouldn't have left the house because you were mauled by that escaped lion.'

Larry M
09-07-2014, 06:18 AM
First, his question was about personal comfort. Second, I don't understand what your answer would be, or why it'd be that.


She shouldn't have gone riding because she was thrown? That's like 'you shouldn't have left the house because you were mauled by that escaped lion.'

So you are bound and determined to attack me and my post instead of responding to the OP's question.

cornflake
09-07-2014, 06:20 AM
So you are bound and determined to attack me and my post instead of responding to the OP's question.

I haven't attacked anything, but if you feel attacked, use the triangle to report a post.

I did respond to the OP's question. I don't think you did.

Perks
09-07-2014, 07:35 AM
I was a midwifery student for a time and I would say that it depends. Some women experience quite a bit of crampy discomfort at the beginning which can make you feel pretty paranoid on top of the discomfort.

If we're just talking about gentle walking while on horseback, then there might not be any reason to stop at all except that after about seven months or so getting on a horse might not be worth all the sweating and cursing.

Some women experience terrible pelvic pain. (A woman's pelvis isn't fused in the front, but held together with a ligament.) Straddling a horse, even as early as twelve weeks or so might be terribly uncomfortable for some women.

If you can tell em when you need her to decline a horseback ride, I can give you some possible excuses.

Fruitbat
09-07-2014, 07:43 AM
She might well stop when her pregnancy reaches that inevitable stage where the public believes she is under their general guidance. If they don't approve, they will shake their no-no fingers at her and lecture her and perhaps even pull her off the horse. She will likely give in because who wants to be pointed out as a bad mother-to-be.

ULTRAGOTHA
09-07-2014, 08:05 AM
My wife was 8+ months pregnant with my step daughter when her horse reared and went over backwards. She was unable to put enough of her weight far enough forward to force it back down, due to her large tummy. Fortunately, the horse fell NEXT to her instead of ON TOP of her. No harm to her or DSD. She didn't even spill her husband's beer she was holding.

So, yeah, when she feels like it.

Fruitbat
09-07-2014, 08:08 AM
If your question includes personal limits, I probably wouldn't do it at all. If she's an experienced rider, perhaps she'd limit her riding to horses she knows and trusts. Along with the other factors, pregnant women vary widely in how careful or adventurous they are with it. So it could show a lot about her personality, as well as her relationship with her husband. He doesn't like it? So, she sneaks, tells him he's not included in the decision, honors his feelings on it, or what? Sorry, probably getting far away from your question...

shaldna
09-07-2014, 11:11 AM
- all because a pregnant woman decided to go horseback riding.

You probably didn't mean it in this way, but this comes across as pretty judgy.





I mean what's your point? Women should spend nine months in a cotton-wool sling, never leaving the house, because they lose the right to their own agency once pregnant? What if the house falls down?

As I've talked about in other threads here, I was 5 months pregnant before I knew, and so I was doing a lot of things that pregnant mothers are generally advised not to. My kid is fine. In fact she's better than fine. We tend to panic and wrap expectant mothers up in cotton wool, all the while forgetting that this is what their bodies are designed to do. What nature intended. Pregnant or not, women are tough and fierce and pregnancy only escalates that.





She shouldn't have gone riding because she was thrown? That's like 'you shouldn't have left the house because you were mauled by that escaped lion.'

I was thrown at 5 months. Quite badly. I was eventing and came off during the cross country phase when we landed badly after a tiger trap.

When I found out I was pregnant I stopped jumping, but I kept riding. Pretty much everyone I know who is horsey did the same thing. We all kept riding. Admittedly there were certain horses I didn't ride during that time because I couldn't trust them, but my big guy I would trust with my life. Incidentally, the first time my daughter rode a horse she was a couple of weeks old and was nestled in her sling while I rode. It continued that way until she was three and we got her a pony of her own. It may sound to outsiders like bad parenting, but when necessity meets passion it's just something you deal with the best way you can.




If we're just talking about gentle walking while on horseback, then there might not be any reason to stop at all except that after about seven months or so getting on a horse might not be worth all the sweating and cursing.

This. Completely. I stopped when I reached the point that I couldn't haul myself up any more.

Plus, there comes a point when you just need to pee all the time and the pressure on your bladder is enough to make you stop.


She might well stop when her pregnancy reaches that inevitable stage where the public believes she is under their general guidance. If they don't approve, they will shake their no-no fingers at her and lecture her and perhaps even pull her off the horse. She will likely give in because who wants to be pointed out as a bad mother-to-be.

Oh god yes, I experienced this a lot. Thankfully I was on a yard where several other folk had kids and knew and understood the situation. There were horses I would ride and horses I wouldn't. I mean, hacking out my 15 year old that I bottlefed is completely different to riding my newly broken 3 year old. I think people need to trust that we, as horse women, know our limitations, but that we also know our animals and what is likely, or unlikely, to happen.



If your question includes personal limits, I probably wouldn't do it at all. If she's an experienced rider, perhaps she'd limit her riding to horses she knows and trusts. Along with the other factors, pregnant women vary widely in how careful or adventurous they are with it. So it could show a lot about her personality, as well as her relationship with her husband. He doesn't like it? So, she sneaks, tells him he's not included in the decision, honors his feelings on it, or what? Sorry, probably getting far away from your question...

This also. The day I found out that I was (very) pregnant I was giving a trampoline lesson (I used to be an instructor) which involved me dropping onto my stomach and somersaulting through the air repeatedly. I certainly panicked about that afterwards, but baby was fine. Turns out that all that fluid in there is there for a reason.

Cath
09-07-2014, 02:55 PM
I asked nicely to focus on the OP's question, but I don't think you got the point. Whether or not someone else answered the question is not at issue. Quit analyzing each other's posts and move on.

Alexandra Little
09-07-2014, 06:04 PM
While not a horse, there was a woman who made the news when she rode her bicycle to the hospital while she was in labor. She said she could have rode it back from the hospital, but she had her bundle of joy by then and so used a car.

shaldna
09-07-2014, 10:50 PM
While not a horse, there was a woman who made the news when she rode her bicycle to the hospital while she was in labor. She said she could have rode it back from the hospital, but she had her bundle of joy by then and so used a car.

My mum was in labour all day with my youngest brother - she cleaned the house, took us to school, picked us up etc all while in labour.

Cath
09-07-2014, 11:39 PM
Pregnant women are awesome, we know this. But how is this contributing to answering the OP's question?

Please focus or I'll lock the thread.

Perks
09-08-2014, 12:08 AM
The only answer is that is could be whenever. Fear of harming the pregnancy, whether based in reality or superstition, might make a woman avoid doing anything jostling at all from the moment she knows she's pregnant.

A hale-to-reckless woman might never stop doing anything that strikes her fancy with likely no ill effects on a pregnancy. A healthy body hosting a normal pregnancy isn't all that frail.

Anywhere in between, there could be issues of physical discomfort that might make riding unpleasant.

In early pregnancy -

- nausea
- cramping
- intense fatigue

could put a damper on any and all activities

In mid to late pregnancy -

- round ligament pain (think of getting speared in the lower abdomen)
- sciatic nerve pain (think of getting speared in the backside)
- pelvic ligament pain (think of getting drawn, but not yet quartered)
- fatigue
- increasing difficulty hauling all that up onto a horse
- the constant sensation of a desperately full bladder

The list is a lot longer, but these are some of the most common reasons.

Now, of course, there could be lots of psychological reasons, too: fear of pregnancy loss, fear of disfiguring the child, fear of disapproval, fear of a specific horse.

You can pick and choose and combine any of this stuff to give your character a reason to stop horseback riding at any stage you need her to stop.

shaldna
09-08-2014, 02:41 AM
Yeah, the pain is a factor that needs to be address for sure - early in pregnancy you can have a lot of pelvic and abdominal pain that can make most activities uncomfortable, but later in pregnancy you can get a lot of back pain, and pains in teh muscles of your stomach that make riding at anything other than a walk/trot quite uncomfortable. In fact I found trot to be the worst gait when I was heavily pregnant as it required me to move my own weight. my legs ached and my stomach muscles rebelled. walk and canter were fine though - much smoother gaits. But I also had a TB with a very long stride which I guess helped. If I'd been riding our 14.1 then it would have been a different story.

Buffysquirrel
09-08-2014, 03:21 AM
It might be easier for people to help with this specific character if we knew more about her. Atm she's very generic so you're getting generic answers. Is she likely to be influenced by nay-sayers? Does she have a very conservative doctor who's likely to advise against riding? Are her friends supportive? Has she had bad falls in the past? and so on.

Dennis E. Taylor
09-08-2014, 03:38 AM
It might be easier for people to help with this specific character if we knew more about her. Atm she's very generic so you're getting generic answers. Is she likely to be influenced by nay-sayers? Does she have a very conservative doctor who's likely to advise against riding? Are her friends supportive? Has she had bad falls in the past? and so on.

I'm really just trying to avoid a throw-the-book-against-the-wall moment. My character is an experienced rider, early 20s, grew up on a ranch, rides her own horse. Her BF is overprotective, doesn't want her to ride. At some point, she's going to say 'OK', even if it's when the baby's head starts to get in the way. I don't have a particular plot-based goal duration. I just didn't want to write something that would make half my potential readership say "WTF????"

Buffysquirrel
09-08-2014, 04:06 AM
Then what you need to do is make it ring true for that character.

sheadakota
09-08-2014, 04:22 AM
I'm really just trying to avoid a throw-the-book-against-the-wall moment. My character is an experienced rider, early 20s, grew up on a ranch, rides her own horse. Her BF is overprotective, doesn't want her to ride. At some point, she's going to say 'OK', even if it's when the baby's head starts to get in the way. I don't have a particular plot-based goal duration. I just didn't want to write something that would make half my potential readership say "WTF????"

I get that- I told myself I would stop riding when I couldn't get on the horse unassisted- that was about 7 months- it also started to get uncomfortable as well- I had to keep one hand on my belly to keep it from hitting the saddle horn. I rode a horse I trusted and was used to as well- that's important- I would never have ridden a horse i didn't trust. my husband was also over protective, but I was sure I wasn't hurting the baby.

Perks
09-08-2014, 05:11 AM
I'm really just trying to avoid a throw-the-book-against-the-wall moment. My character is an experienced rider, early 20s, grew up on a ranch, rides her own horse. Her BF is overprotective, doesn't want her to ride. At some point, she's going to say 'OK', even if it's when the baby's head starts to get in the way. I don't have a particular plot-based goal duration. I just didn't want to write something that would make half my potential readership say "WTF????"

The baby's head isn't in the way until a few minutes before its born.

Dennis E. Taylor
09-08-2014, 06:17 AM
The baby's head isn't in the way until a few minutes before its born.

Exactly! :D

Lindy
09-10-2014, 12:51 AM
I'm sure you've already gotten the answers you need, but I'll go ahead and chime in anyway :)

I just had a baby 9 months ago, and I also rodeo. With my first pregnancy, I stopped riding around 6 or 7 months just because I was completely off balance with the weight gain. This last pregnancy, my husband wanted me to stop riding right away, because I have a mare who can be, well, ornery at times. My husband and I got into an argument and I made a big show of "See? It's fine!" until, of course, the mare blew up on me and turned into a bronc across the arena.

The baby was completely fine, but needless to say, I stopped riding until after I delivered...and I definitely ate my share of crow.

The point here is that a woman can technically ride until she no longer is comfortable doing so. However, horses are living, breathing, spookable things that sometimes do what they want when they want, which isn't the safest situation in the world for a pregnant woman.