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View Full Version : Gimme all your Denver, pretty please!



Los Pollos Hermanos
08-29-2014, 05:51 AM
Here's where I get demanding, so you lovely people have been warned in advance... ;)

My current situation:
All three instalments of my crime trilogy are complete, apart from the Big Continuity Edit/Partial Rewrite Edit (in the earliest of stages) and the Big Technical Edit (I'm saving that hell for another month).

The story takes place over the 23 years between 1986-2009 in a fair few locations which needed reconnaissance:
NW England = Easy to visit locations whenever I need to.
Bavaria & Zurich = Been to each place enough times to have what I need for the limited number of sections occurring there.
The good ol' US-of-A: One mad long weekend in NYC ages ago, a week in/around Denver and three uber-roadtrips taking in 17 states (not all for book research, but most enjoyable all the same). I needed big open spaces, mountains and ravines - which we don't do well in the UK.

The majority of the US-based action takes place in/around Denver and Golden, with a little bit of Boulder thrown in and the occasional visit to Breckenridge, Winter Park, Granby, Telluride, Cortez and RMNP. I've been to all these places, some more than once. However, visiting in July/August as a tourist - albeit a not particularly touristy tourist - doesn't give the same perspectives and experiences as actually living in a place all year round.

I've been attentive. I've looked, asked, listened, smelled and tasted (too much tasting, according to my waistbands) my way around these places and carried out an inordinate amount of internet-based research.

So... what I really need now are those little snippets of Mile High authenticity I've missed by being a vacationing flatlander Limey. ANY little random-isms from the locals about Denver/Golden/Colorado in general which will fatten up my story are most welcome. Nothing is too strange!

Finally, before I shut up for a while, here's a bit of background about the main characters:

Family (1990-1993).
Move from England due to job relocation. Family lives near Golden, son goes to school in Golden, dad works in Denver, mum is a hausfrau (she's originally German).

Not related to...

Mr Good Guy (2001-2009).
Originally English, but isn't hung up about it (he even prefers coffee!). Has US citizenship (I've investigated this). Works in law enforcement. Lives in Wheat Ridge (rented apartment) and then Golden (bought small house). Likes hiking, cycling, beer. Not a skier. Bit of a perfectionist/stick up his ass at times. Belly sometimes gets homesick for English food, but not England. Meets Mrs Good Guy on a case in 2004 (she's originally from Boulder).

Family Good Guy (2004-2009).
Marry in 2005, daughter in 2006, son in 2009. Move to the outskirts of Golden. Family-oriented. Similar interests.

Massive thanks in advance!

LPH.

Chris P
08-29-2014, 06:08 AM
I've only been to Denver briefly once or twice, so I can't really help you there. But I would suggest for research purposes signing up at Couchsurfing.org to contact people in various locations. Couchsurfing is usually to find people to stay with while traveling, but people are happy to provide info and will probably do some fact checking for you. It's free and you don't have to agree to host people (although it's a great way to meet tons of interesting people and stay for free when you travel :))

CrastersBabies
08-29-2014, 07:26 AM
Lived in Denver. Grew up 2 miles from Golden (in Wheat Ridge--actually graduated from WR High School). In Golden, there's always the smell of the Coors brewery. That hops/malty smell. From the time I was 18 until 23, most of my male friends had (at one time) worked at Coors. It's one of the best jobs for young men anywhere, but they usually only do short-term contracts. So, guys would work there for 6 months, get as much overtime as possible and save up.

About 15 minutes west (into the mountains) from Golden is Central City and Blackhawk where the gambling takes place. And Central City. As a high school kid, we would drive up that way, go to Lookout Mountain (where youngsters went to make-out). It was just a few parking places overlooking all of Denver--lit up and pretty, but yeah. I definitely kissed a boy or two up there. Afterwards, we'd drive to the Central City graveyard because they had creepy old gravestones there and it was out in the country a bit.

Right now, Golden has nice parts and sketchy parts. Some of the crime element have drifted in from Arvada and Edgewater, but there are still some decent places. Mostly nestled into the foothills (mountains) or closer to Rolling Hills Country Club (google that). VERY wealthy neighborhood there.

There's an "M" on one of the mountains. I remember that growing up.

http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/8323

Apartments in Wheat Ridge are also going to range from sketchy to pretty decent. The better ones will be near Youngfield, near Applejack Liquor (google that as well. It used to be the largest independently-owned liquor store in the country. It's like Costco of liquor stores. I worked there for a few years. Lots of people stopping there on their way to Aspen and other skiing destinations.)

The further north-east you go in Wheat Ridge, the sketchier it gets. The nicer apartments are older. Like little garden areas. Lots of green in Wheat Ridge. (And Wheat Ridge will turn into Golden very quickly if you take 32nd Avenue West. It will take you right by Coors. Under one of the company's walkways and RIGHT into downtown Golden.

Golden in THAT area is like a small town unto itself. You have a main street "feel" with little shops.

http://www.golden.com/postcards/008c-900.jpg

The wife is from Boulder? Be aware that Boulder is the extreme left/liberal. Everyone else in Colorado calls Boulderites "granola heads." It can go extreme on "Green" and recycling and water birthing for pregnant women and such. Like, if you are walking down the street and put a paper cup in the trash (and not the recycling bin) you might get cussed out. Lots of homeless "hippie" types with dreadlocks. I dated a guy in the early 2000's who lived in a 4-bedroom house with 12 other people, family, commune-style. Having sex in a room w/o a door (and with others 8 feet away was weird). So, keep that in mind. There are some "average" type people live there. It's super SUPER expensive to live/rent. I know 3 professors who teach there and they make it a point to live in another area (that isn't Boulder), haha.

For schools, Golden and Wheat Ridge are in Jefferson County. A pretty solid school system (and the same district that Columbine was in, just fyi).

If he works in law enforcement, he knows about this place.

The hideous building of doom (the Jefferson County Courthouse). I remember a lot of people being pissed that so much money was spent on this place:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4b/Jefferson_County_Courthouse_from_I-70.jpg

Trying to think of other things.

Red Rocks Amphitheatre is one of the most badass places in the world to go to a concert. And beautiful.

If you have more specific questions, holler. I'm your peep! (And if I think of anything else, I'll let you know.)

CrastersBabies
08-29-2014, 07:32 AM
Denver is a city much like Austin (I've heard). Lots of music, art, culture. I lived downtown for a bit. I can answer questions about that as well.

Colfax is a street in the Denver area that will go across the entire city. From west (Golden) to east. "East Colfax" is where are the hookers hang out. Still a joke to this day if you live in Colorado.

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-29-2014, 04:12 PM
Muchos thanks, lovely people! :D I'll dissect what I've got so far (in no particular order)...

Colfax - I've driven down W Colfax between Colorado Mills* and the city centre** and a little bit of E Colfax. West has some interesting looking motels, etc, but East definitely seemed less salubrious. Had a chuckle at Tom's Diner (bad early 90s song - don't know if it was inflicted stateside). I found it a surprisingly civilised drive, but then anything's civilised after Houston/Dallas. I also read that most of Denver's gang activity is in the eastern side of the city?? Nobody's been seeking out hookers, btw. Yet.

* I think the place is bargain-tastic. $42 including tax for a pair of Levi's 501s when we'd pay the equivalent of $110+ over here. Do the locals share my opinion, or am I merely a product of Rip-Off Britain? I couldn't believe how huge the Target is either.

** My story uses British English spellings throughout, but in the American sections I've said things like parking lot instead of car park in the narrative. I've also had to really swot up on American English for the dialogue and those tiny differences which make all the difference (e.g. Take a bath/Have a bath or Make a left/Turn left).

Twice I stayed for a week at the La Quinta in Wheat Ridge (Youngfield Service Road next to I-70 - I got a room at the back both times where it's quieter). I also had my final night posh hotel treat at Table Mountain Inn last summer - that was lurrverley. I'd drive into Golden by W 32nd, panic at the roundabout/traffic circle*, sniff the brewery** and park FOR FREE*** for as long as I needed on that multi-storey car park/parking garage on Jackson Street.

* There's not many in the US, so whilst I'm happy enough to drive on the right, occasionally going the "wrong" way around a roundabout scares me stupid.

** Did the tour. Quite interesting and free beer. I'm not a massive beer fan but, being English, it's rare I turn down a free tipple. ;) The brewery isn't as whiffy as one a few miles from where I live - that place reeks, even in winter.

*** This doesn't happen in England, apart from in vile little towns you'd never want to visit in the first place.

Passed through Blackhawk on one of my reccie-ing potential murder sites missions. Richman Street made me laugh!

Lookout Mountain - Mr Good Guy enjoys cycling up there a couple of times a week. Those cyclists must be seriously fit to be able to cope with cycling up there AND at that altitude*. Or mad, I haven't decided yet. Fabulous views, the occasional mule deer with a death wish (don't get me started on how Colorado's wildlife has no concept of how to cross the road safely ;)), Mr & Mrs Good Guy are past the snogging (making out) in the car thing, although the teenage boy in the early 90s might well be interested.

* See below for altitude comments. I do notice that I'm permanently ravenous in RMNP and anywhere else above ~10,000 feet. I assume your body is burning more energy to keep you going because of the thinner air? My house is at ~280 feet - our local mountain is ~1,800!

The M on Mt Zion (I've previously googled that) and the School of Mines. Lots of blokes with beards - geologists?! (I've got a geology degree - all our lecturers had beards, even the women!!).

Didn't know there was a Colorado-Texas rivalry - is it two-sided? Could explain why I encountered so much hostility driving in TX last summer - my poor little rental car had CO plates. "Welcome to Texas! Drive friendly - the Texas way". Yeah, right. :rant:

Applejacks - I've been to the Walmart* near there and had to google when it opened (before 1990, so that's okay), so learnt a bit about that place. I didn't go in the liquor store though, but might drop in that Mr Good Guy went to buy a box (6 bottles? 12 bottles?) of Mrs Good Guy's favourite vino.

* parking lot full of RVs at night - is this allowed?!

Mr Good Guy's early days Wheat Ridge apartment is only referred to in passing - no scenes are set there. He mentions to his boss that he's got a place there but is looking in Golden. He then buys a small place on 12th St, but the backstory is that he inherited a fair stack of from his recently deceased grandmother as I know those little old houses aren't cheap. He gets married and they buy a family home off 19th St. I imagine it to be at the top end of Mt Zion Drive, although the exact location is never specified. I walked up there from town to get the sights/sounds/smells, etc. That was a killer! I'm fine walking on the flat, but my poor little flatlander lungs notice if I have to walk uphill for a while, or up a lot of steps.

I noticed the end of Golden going out towards Colorado Mills (roundabouts! argh!) isn't as nice as the areas around town. I really like the town part of Golden - it has that small town feel, but not in a Deliverance kind of way. I found the locals really friendly and helpful, and I would eat at D'Deli every day if I could (ooooh, those brownies...). How's the area north of town going out towards 93 (Washington Street - North Ford Street area) regarded?

Rolling Hills looks lovely - but would probably be too pricey for them. I did notice there were plenty of nice houses on that stretch between Wheat Ridge and Golden. Plus, they like being able to walk into town and back, so the Mt Zion Drive area suits them.

The first family live in Paradise Hills in the early 90s - but not for long... (spooky music, etc). Deliciously ironic! :evil

Mrs Good Guy is one of the more normal Boulderites, although her hubby's colleagues/co-workers refer to her (jokingly) as a trust fund hippy* from time to time. I don't delve into her background much, but I imagine her being from one of those fairly wealthy families who aren't flashy so you don't immediately realise they're not without pennies in the bank. She's into home cooking and keep fit. She mentions selling her rabbit hutch Boulder apartment** and moving to Golden shortly before they get married. Last time I was in Boulder, there was a load of crusty/grebo*** types doing yoga or similar in the middle of Pearl Street - quite bizarre. There's some nice shops along there, I have to say.

* I'm going to have to put a disclaimer in the acknowledgements to say "All opinions expressed herein are those of my characters and do not reflect the views of the author"!

** Those real estate websites are a big help, and make me realise how much we have to pay for pokey houses over here.

*** http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crusties
What's the Colorado slang word for these folks? Hippies?

Son from first family attends a fictionalised version of Golden High School and is delighted he no longer has to wear school uniform!! Incidentally, there was a documentary about Columbine on TV over here earlier this week. Horrible is an understatement, although here isn't immune (a teacher of forty years who was set to retire this summer got stabbed to death in her classroom in April). Mr & Mrs Good Guy's kids aren't ready for school yet. She gives up work (for a few years is the intention) after the second arrives because hubby got promoted (more money, but has to work away from home sometimes).

Mr Good Guy works in central Denver. I've walked around the 16th Street Mall area and the surrounding streets, but only in summer and only during daylight. Compared to cities like London, I couldn't believe how clean the city centre is.

I've noticed the Courthouse (can't miss it!), although it doesn't play a huge role in this story. I've just googled that it cost over $100 million over 20 years ago - no wonder people grumbled! I'll throw that one in at an appropriate place.

And ... breathe!

Huge thanks again!

LPH.

p.s. Family Good Guy don't die in 2009, it's just when this story ends.

Wilde_at_heart
08-29-2014, 06:04 PM
I've a cousin who lives ... somewhere in Colorado, I forget where now exactly, and a friend who used to live in Denver for a couple of years.

One thing both of them have said is that there's lots of sun - it's one of the sunniest parts of the US. It may have changed recently, but water rights and usage are serious business. In many areas, rain barrels are forbidden.

Forest fires can be a major problem in the summer - my cousin's been close to being smoked out a couple of times. SUVs are very popular, but so are the sort of grocery store chains the greenies like to go to - Whole Foods, Trader Joes, etc.

And yes, 'crusties' are hippies.

I'm not sure if this site is good for older info, but there's tonnes for any city in the US: http://www.city-data.com/

Myrealana
08-29-2014, 06:18 PM
I've live in Colorado all my life. Went to school in Boulder, now live southeast of Denver and work in Englewood.




There's an "M" on one of the mountains. I remember that growing up.
The M is for the Colorado School of Mines. Every year, the freshman have to climb up the hill while being harassed by the upper classmen and re-paint it white. So, it starts out white in late August, early September and fades through the year until the next freshman class comes in.

When I was going to school in Boulder, I had a number of friends who regularly biked up Lookout Mountain. I always took a car.

I've never heard the term "Crusties." In Boulder, we called them "Granolas" behind their backs, but you had to be careful, because you could never really be sure who might be a closet granola.

Pearl Street Mall is great for people watching. You get all types. Granolas, Bible-thumpers, buskers, general crazies, college students. Lots of college students. There are some fun stores there on the mall. I remember a great kite store, possible called "Into the Air." So much fun. I never had enough money to buy anything, but I did enjoy the shopping.

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-29-2014, 06:24 PM
Cheers me dears!

Lovely and sunny, although when it rains it does it in style (especially in the mountains). I got the best tan in years last summer within a week just by wandering around. Need to be careful at higher altitudes though, the first time I went up Mt Evans I forgot the factor 50 for my nose (which freckles and goes red, even though the rest of me doesn't freckle and goes brown), resulting in an especially attractive Rudolph look for a couple of days. Factor 15 is enough for the rest of me (I rarely bother in the UK - sometimes factor 15 on the snout). I also like the fact it's a dry heat in Denver - I love it hot, but loathe humidity.

Apparently Trader Joe's came to Denver earlier this year. I love TJ's (discovered it in Las Vegas and then found one in Salt Lake City) and all those expensive yummies - if I lived in the US it would be a payday treat for me though, a bit like going to Marks & Spencer's food hall over here.

I saw the aftermath of the 2012 fires around Manitou Springs last summer - it must be awful to lose everything. I know a home can be rebuilt, but some items are priceless (e.g. old photos, family heirlooms of any value) and then there's the memories of having a family there, etc. The only place I was fairly close to fires was near Boise, ID in 2012. At one point you could see them in the distance, it was like driving in mist and you could even taste the smoke.

City Data has been a great resource, as has Google streetview - and AW, obviously!

Big thanks,

LPH.

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-29-2014, 06:36 PM
Oooooh, more info! More thanks!

Granola - love it. That's definitely going in somewhere. Agreed about Pearl Street being great for people-watching. I picked up a few little gifts for people, but much of what was for sale was outside my budget and British Airways' baggage allowance.

The extra info about the M is a gud 'un too. And, there's no way I could walk up that hill at anything more than a snail's pace, let alone cycle. I saw people cycling up Mt Evans both times too - that's the ultimate dedication/madness!

Googles...
http://www.intothewind.com/
I think I remember seeing this place now you come to mention it. I've never had a kite. :cry: When I snare myself a rich Colorado cowboy on my next visit he can buy one for me!

Cheers,

LPH.

CrastersBabies
08-29-2014, 07:24 PM
LOL, sounds like you've had a good romp through! (Unless I'm misreading.)

A few questions I saw:



Didn't know there was a Colorado-Texas rivalry - is it two-sided? Could explain why I encountered so much hostility driving in TX last summer - my poor little rental car had CO plates. "Welcome to Texas! Drive friendly - the Texas way". Yeah, right.

Well, Colorado - Texas - California rivalry. Colorado gets a LOT of people relocating from Texas and California. (More California in my day, then slowly more Texans over the decades.) There's a big "thing" about having that "Colorado Native" sticker. Kind of a "been here first and knew it was awesome" deal. There are also "Semi-Native" stickers. In my 30's, there was this "concern" that people from California, for example, that would all move here and make the cost of living go up.

And you could always spot the new Texans after the first big snow. Coloradans know how to drive in the snow. (At least the "real ones" do. Hehehe.)

Applejack has an amazing selection and great "Expertise" in all things alcohol. They had a "wine guy" who would travel to Italy and France a few times a year, a whiskey guy, a beer guy. Colorado has a metric ASSLOAD of microbreweries now.

RVs, Walmart, from what I know, allows RVs to park the night. I've known about that since I was probably in my early 20's (in the 90's and such). Not sure if it's a "formal" deal, or an unspoken thing. THAT Walmart that you're talking about off Youngfield is kind of an older one now. (It was so new when I Was young! eeek!) Go NORTH on Youngfield about a mile and you'll hit WARD road where you find some hardcore truck stops. Some porn shops. A few hookers (for the truckers, I presume!).

The altitude is something I can feel when I go to another part of the country and go back. I've seen new college students go throught a week or two of lethargy if they aren't used to it. :)

Old Golden Houses. Depends on when he bought it. They were probably pretty darn cheap in the late 80's and early 90's. Now, they will likely be more expensive, yeah. Old house personality and such.

A trust fund hippie in Boulder? Absolutely possible! you really have it with the keeping fit part. Colorado is a super "fit" state with outdoor activities. The hiking and bicycling (mentioned already), but also rock-climbing. Lots of geocaching here as well. (If you don't know what that is, look it up.)

Boulder, Peal Street is a mecca for all kinds of interesting activities. Hari Krishnas, yogis, dudes beating drums. It's actually a cool place with some funky shops. That college-town vibe mixed with Boulderite whatnot.

((I have more, but have to run to work. Will type more later.))

Myrealana
08-29-2014, 08:33 PM
A trust fund hippie in Boulder? Absolutely possible! you really have it with the keeping fit part. Colorado is a super "fit" state with outdoor activities. The hiking and bicycling (mentioned already), but also rock-climbing. Lots of geocaching here as well. (If you don't know what that is, look it up.)
Best place in the world to be a trust fund hippie.

My dad went to school with one. He took just about every undergrad course offered at CU-Boulder until they basically forced him to graduate, and he has spent the last 40 years or so hanging out, playing guitar on Pearl Street, smoking weed on Lookout Mountain, and generally being a bum. Never had a job for more than a few weeks. Never got married. Just spent his life doing whatever seemed fun at the time, living off his inheritance. It's not like everyone in Boulder is like that, but I think everyone who has lived there knows someone like him, so it happens, possibly more than in other places.

CrastersBabies
08-29-2014, 10:08 PM
Best place in the world to be a trust fund hippie.

My dad went to school with one. He took just about every undergrad course offered at CU-Boulder until they basically forced him to graduate, and he has spent the last 40 years or so hanging out, playing guitar on Pearl Street, smoking weed on Lookout Mountain, and generally being a bum. Never had a job for more than a few weeks. Never got married. Just spent his life doing whatever seemed fun at the time, living off his inheritance. It's not like everyone in Boulder is like that, but I think everyone who has lived there knows someone like him, so it happens, possibly more than in other places.

That is so "Boulder," imho. While people make fun of it (including me), there is this cool vibe there, like you could just chill. Forever.

Just avoid the frat houses. :D

Los Pollos, will have more later. Just got home. Need nap. Then caffeine. In that order.

Myrea, for some reason I forgot (or did not know) you were in Denver. Maybe the stars will align someday and we can catch a coffee. I'm in Fort Collins now, but make it down to Denver now and then. :)

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-29-2014, 10:40 PM
Ooooh, you legends! I really appreciate all the CO-ness coming my way.

I certainly got out and about when I was out in Colorado - identified where I needed to reccie and made the most of my time. Asked random questions, stayed off the tourist trail as much as possible and tried to blend in - which I can do until I open my mouth.

I've seen the Colorado Native stickers - and tried the beer of the same name (brought one of the six back for my dad). They should do a "Colorado Wannabe Native" sticker - haha! I got asked for ID buying the beer (I'm nearer 40 than 30 - eek!) at that lovely big Target at Colorado Mills - and held up the queue/line because my driving licence/driver's license (bilingual, me ;) ) was foreign, so the poor guy behind the till had to call for a supervisor. Luckily the people behind saw the funny side.

I remember driving back from RMNP last summer - drove through from the Estes Park end and hit I-70 near Empire. Then the heavens opened. I'm English, I know rain (it's drizzling as I type and we're considering putting on the heating - haha!) - but this was rain. On steroids. In England, people still drive like idiots when you can barely see beyond the car's bonnet/hood, but on I-70 everyone slowed down to ~15mph and crawled along. Despite this, I was borderline aquaplaning - really scary in the dark.

"Hookers for the truckers" - got to get that line in somehow!

Mr Good Guy bought his house on 12th St in 2002.
http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/1105-12th-St_Golden_CO_80401_M18013-68301?row=30
With the deposit from dearly departed granny and a mortgage he could easily afford something like this.

Being a trust fund hippy sounds like a good deal to me - work is a real intrusion these days. ;) Gets in the way of writing and napping!

Much appreciated, again. Cheers,

LPH.

ScienceFictionMommy
08-30-2014, 08:28 AM
Don't forget the "People's Republic of Boulder," the name given to it by most others who don't live there. I don't know if the name is still popular now, but it definitely was in the 90s/early 2000s.

As to rain, it's mainly afternoon thunderstorms. They come, they pour, they light up the sky, and then they go away. Pretty quickly. Every now and then it rains all day, but that is truly bizarre and worth noting because it seldom happens.

Big mountains produce their own weather. When everything else is dry, it is not uncommon for the 14ers to attract storms every day in the summer. When you live near one, you'll get some of the effects of that. If your characters are hiking/biking up anything truly high, they'll have to pay special attention to the weather, get an early start, and get below tree line by 1:00-2:00pm.

We're coming out of a drought that has lasted for many years. By the end of your story (2009) it's been very hot and very dry, even more so than usual. That's a big factor in all the sever fires we've had over the last few years. This year we're getting dumped on. I heard on the radio recently that we're at 4 inches more rain than is normal this year. We've had to use our umbrellas a lot this year, whereas we almost never pull them out normally.

During the first snow of the season, even when it's minor, the roads get very clogged. Whether it's all the transplants or everybody has forgotten how to drive in the snow over the summer--those of us who still remember how to drive in the snow bitch and moan to other people who remember how to drive in the snow about all the morons who don't.

I worked in Downtown Denver for several years, a few blocks off 16th Street Mall. I would take the light rail in and out. It was generally pretty safe, although I always stuck to the larger/more populous streets. There are a decent number of panhandlers and buskers trying to get handouts. Parking is obnoxious (which is why I took the light rail.) Lots of one-way streets and overpriced surface lots. You can usually find something, but it won't necessarily be convenient to where you want to be. There are street festivals on the mall every now and then, which can be fun or a pain, depending on whether you have the leisure to stroll slowly through them.

In the summer, they put up smalls dams on Cherry Creek and offer gondola rides called "Venice on the Creek." This ends close to where Cherry Creek meets the South Platte (Confluence Park,) and there are some rapids there where it's quite common to see kayakers on the Platte.

I really ought to get to work on my own writing now. But if you have specific questions about Denver or Boulder, shoot them my way. (Worked downtown Denver from 2001-2008, went to CU Boulder from 1999-2001.)

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-30-2014, 04:05 PM
Many thanks for the extra goodies!

I might have to step-up the Boulder-related teasing he gets for marrying a granola head. I assume it's healthy granola in Boulder, as opposed to the mass-produced granola over here which is marketed as a healthy alternative but is rammed full of enough sugar to dissolve your pancreas. Quite nice though!

Some googling found this:
https://www.bouldergranola.com/
People's Republic of Boulder still seems current, unless someone can confirm otherwise. I liked the place (quirky shops, clean city centre, people were friendly), but preferred Golden as it was more my... not sure if style is the correct word, but I'm not particularly New Age, etc. I'd much prefer a huge bowl of Lucky Charms for breakfast! :D

I've been to the PRoB twice - once for the afternoon in summer 2010 (it was showery) and a Sunday morning last summer when it drizzled the whole time. I also found the signposting on the roads terrible on both visits - last time it took me an hour to find the route out to Nederland*. The sign was obscured by an overgrown tree and I only spotted it because I had to stop for the lights in that exact place. There's only one chapter currently set in Boulder and that's a suburban police/FBI situation, straight after which Mr Good Guy meets his future missus. However, it's referred to regularly.

* Looking for potential out of town murder/body dump sites - or just nice locations for my characters to have a day out. Filled my belly with delicious German grub at the Westfalen Hof on the way back as I'm obsessed with German food. Wasn't impressed by Cafe Berlin in the city though.

Both pilgrimages up Mt Evans involved a 7.00am start and being at the top for 8.30am. The first time was cool (8C/46F) and breezy, the second time was cold and blowing a gale (air temp 5C/41F, wind chill -12C/10F). Amazing views, although I was back at the "bottom" a couple of hours later. The altitude didn't bother me - I could tell I was breathing faster (with the occasional deep sigh, which I've noticed I do even when driving above ~11,000 feet), but paced myself and didn't get out of breath. The first time I was just starting with the headache after 90 minutes, but by the time I was back down at ~7,000 feet it had gone. Next time I intend to do my research, park at Summit Lake and hike the last part. Bagging a 14er, flatlander style!

I've also been up Pikes Peak twice - by cog train in 2010 and drove it in 2013. Preferred driving it as I like to stop when I want to and not be constrained by time. And, those doughnuts are to die for. The first time I only got two. Last year I got six of the beauties - three for breakfast, three for lunch! Get up there nice and early when it's quiet and sunny.

The driving in snow thing is the same over here - so many people don't have a clue (slow speed, high gear, low revs - easy). It's rare we get more than 2-3 inches of the stuff where I live, but the place grinds to a halt. A Scottish ex-colleague used to go nuts about how bad English people are at driving in snow. When I lived in the SE (20 miles south of London) we'd get sent home from school if there was more than half an inch of powder (or grey slush as it is there). Absolutely ridiculous, although we never complained!

I parked (for free - such joy!) at Sheridan and got the light rail into the city last summer, to avoid the parking hassles you've mentioned. I felt perfectly safe on the light rail in the day, although can it get a bit hairy at night? The Tube in London can be like that, although I suppose public transport anywhere can be interesting after the sun goes down. Certain bus routes during my uni days in Manchester were also to be avoided during daylight hours.

Big thanks again,

LPH.

Siri Kirpal
08-30-2014, 10:07 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

My experience of Denver is confined to the airport.

What I want to say is: I notice you use the word "whilst" a lot. That's very Brit, so be sure your American's don't use it.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-30-2014, 10:44 PM
Sat Nam in return!

Oh yes - it's "while" all the way with my American characters!! I always write "whilst", whereas in my speech it's probably a 50-50 split.

I liked DIA, by airport standards. Well signposted, clean (why are Americans so much better at putting rubbish in the bin/trash in the can than we are?!), weird murals AND it looks like a circus tent. ;) I also liked the big blue stallion with the psycho eyes, although apparently a lot of people don't. The duty free shop isn't great, but it at least sells Patron tequila at half the UK price.

Last time, the car rental shuttle bus tipped everyone out in the domestic flights section, as there was road construction work going on somewhere and it was apparently quicker for us to schlepp through the airport to international departures. Try dragging an overweight to the max case ($60 fee ready - I consider it an investment) a loooong way through an airport in a region which is stingy on its oxygen! I stopped to verify I was going in the right direction and could barely spit out the words. Same case back in England + lots of lovely O2 = not a problem. :D

Muchos thanks!

LPH.

lacygnette
08-30-2014, 11:17 PM
I was raised in WR - hi CrasterBaby whoever you are, went to DU and CU. Couple of notes I didn't see. There is a Purina factory as you drive along i-70; such a stink. The National Western Stock show is, or used to be, a big deal in January. Not only stock, but a rodeo.

About the little rain. In college we always knew who came from out of state - they had umbrellas. I never owned one in all the years I lived there.

Winter snows go away fast in the sun and we seldom had snow days. Unlike DC where it takes only 1/2" and everything closes. But there is no spring. I always read about the spring flowers, but never experienced it until I came east. You have winter, almost winter, winter again, a week of spring and it's June.

The Texas rivalry, according to my dad, came because the Texans flocked to Colorado, particularly the Western Slope, bought up acres of land, and fenced off areas where folks (i.e. my dad) had been fishing for years.

Our family went often to Winter Park on holiday. Snow shoeing and sledding on the big inner tubes of tires were as much fun as skiing.

Enjoyed this thread. Reminded me of things.

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-31-2014, 12:24 AM
Hello and thanks for more CO goodness!

Does the Purina place reek because of cooking the cat/dog food, or because there's an abattoir (is that word used in the US, or is it always slaughterhouse?) nearby? There's an abattoir next door to a supermarket near where I work - sometimes it absolutely hums, especially on one of our rare hot summer days.

I keep an eye on Denver's weather forecast (it's saved on my favourites on the BBC's weather page) - I've noticed that one day it can be way below freezing and the next day it's warmed up a lot.

I have to say Texas is the only state I've been to that I'd never visit again (San Antonio was okay, but that's all). Not as friendly as they make it out to be - on and off the roads. Colorado is my favourite state, with Nevada in second place and North Dakota in third, btw.

There's a triple murder near Winter Park in my story, btw.:scared:

Glad you're enjoying the thread!

Cheers,

LPH.

Marta
08-31-2014, 07:30 AM
I grew up in Arvada near Wheat Ridge, went to school in Boulder, and left the state in 1984, but visit family regularly. Here are a few observations that I hope may be useful to you.

The weather in Colorado east of the mountains tends to mean snow in the winter that usually doesn't stay long (except for sidewalks, which tend to get icy in shaded areas), wet springs in April and perhaps May, drier summers with afternoon thunderstorms and occasional hail, and falls with a lot of warm days from the chinook winds coming off the mountains. The mountain areas will have snow sticking, with enough to ski on starting around Winter Park, though Interstate 70 is usually plowed quickly and is drivable even in snowstorms with snow tires or chains. The mountains tend to get more rain in the summer than the plains. That said, the weather is different every year. Some winters are quite cold at times and snow may be heavy; other years, it will be mostly like fall weather. So it will be very important that you check the weather reports for the months your story is set in.

Another noticeable change is that along Interstate 70, a lot of the Ponderosa pines have declined a lot: many, many dead trees from the pine beetles. If anyone is driving in the mountains when the weather first gets cold, some areas will have striking patches where aspen trees have turned golden.

In the pricier ski resorts, like Aspen and Vail, there's some tension because very wealthy people own large second homes, while seasonal workers, including many who may live in the areas, often have difficulty affording a place to stay, yet the cities subsidize bringing power, water, and other services to houses outside the city limits. I don't know to what extent that would be true around Winter Park, but suspect it's also the case for Breckenridge. Gambling is legal in three small mountain towns since 1991, Central City, Black Hawk, and Cripple Creek. Central City also has a well-regarded opera; Aspen has a summer classical music festival.

Marta
08-31-2014, 07:47 AM
Continuing--part of my post was cut off.

Boulder has a lot of highly educated people due to the university, as well as government research facilities such as NOAA and high-tech industry (semiconductors and biotech). All this brings in a lot of students and visitors, including foreign graduate students. The university has a reputation as a party school, especially for students from out of state. There are cheap eateries, but also a lot of very nice, very expensive restaurants, especially around the pedestrian-only Pearl Street Mall, but also scattered through other parts of town. There's a large farmer's market near the Justice Center from April through November, with exotic vegetables and food stalls. The Flatirons and hills nearby have lots of hiking trails, many accessible year-round except during heavy snow. Mountain lions have been spotted.

Golden has the government's renewable energy research laboratories, NREL, and Denver also has several Federal government agencies and a good share of Federal contractors. Between Golden and Boulder is a wind energy research facility and the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons facility, now with a controversial housing development planned. Along the Boulder Turnpike (36) running between Denver and Boulder, there's a huge shopping mall in Broomfield (close to Boulder) called Flatiron Crossing. If any of your characters went to Boulder before and after it was built (2000), they would notice the extensive development of the mall and the housing developments near it. Denver also has the well-respected Tattered Cover bookstore; the very large Cherry Creek location closed in 2006, but there are still three locations.

Another notable change visible since the 1990s is the expansion of pedestrian and biking trails, especially in urban areas, but also in Golden and along stretches in the mountains, for example parts of Interstate 70. Lots of bikers in Boulder, some students using them to commute around town, but also mountain bikers, even racers. Also around the mid-1990s, light rail was also introduced to downtown Denver.

ScienceFictionMommy
08-31-2014, 08:43 AM
You LIKED Blucifer? (The spooky horse at the airport.) Crazy Brit!


You have winter, almost winter, winter again, a week of spring and it's June.

Exactly. It's so hard to know when to plant things.

The dog food plant (Commerce City) smells because of the dog food. The most notorious nearby slaughterhouse is in Greely. I grew up further north (Longmont) and we could always tell when the wind was blowing south, because it would smell like Greely.

Interesting you would mention places to dump a body. There's plenty of wilderness, especially around Winter Park and other mountain towns, where things could go unnoticed for a long time. People respect the wilderness, especially when they're reminded that they're supposed to, so if somebody dumps something off the beaten path, it can take a while to find.

Just biked 20 miles in the mountains today myself.

Ow.

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-31-2014, 03:46 PM
Thanks for the extra CO goodies!

Blucifer?! Quality name for a quality nag. I read somewhere that people think he's haunted because he killed his creator? And that there's Area 52 beneath the airport? I love a good conspiracy theory, even if it's hokum.

The body dump site(s) reconnaisance is predominantly for some future story ideas I've had. Two need a large city and would probably also work in the UK, but it would have to be somewhere like Birmingham (urgh) or London (double urgh). Another needs serious boonies* so wouldn't work over here. If I use Colorado for all of them it means I can recycle some of my cops/Feds AND have an excuse for another visit. That would be a chore... :D I've also had an idea needing a small town, which I'd probably set where I live. It would work in a larger town, and also not in the UK, but I quite fancy setting it just down the road.

* I stayed in Kremmling for a couple of nights last summer - fabulous! During the road trip's plotting stages I looked at the map and thought Steamboat Springs would be a good place to stay between Salt Lake City and Golden - until I saw the cost of hotels, hence Kremmling. Which I have to say was much nicer. Steamboat Springs and Breckenridge are very pretty, but a bit on the sanitised touristy side.

On the subject of Breckenridge, I've got Mr & Mrs Good Guy staying there on a no kids getaway for a few days in a cabin belonging to a friend of her dad's (another time they take the kids). We have the second home issue in some places over here - the locals, especially the young, are priced out of their home towns/villages. There was something on TV about the Cotswolds recently - average house prices are something like 18 times average earnings, which means getting a mortgage ain't happening for lots of locals.

Agreed about Colorado having some excellent places to dispose of a dead body or five. Via Streetview I found a wonderful ravine on Route 40 near Berthoud Pass, and there's room to pull off the road. I was there with my camera snapping away, hoping the police/sheriff/Feds wouldn't turn up. That could've been an interesting conversation...

"What are you doing, ma'am?"
"Just checking out a pretty decent looking body dump site, officer."

I also assume if you dumped a body somewhere like that Yogi and Boo-Boo would soon make a pickernick out of it?

Biking in the mountains... I could cope with hiking, but probably not biking - unless it was fairly flat! Which defeats the purpose of going biking in the mountains.

The weather... I've got a website saved which I can use to look up what it was like on any day in a particular place, if it's relevant. I'm a bit anally retentive like that - if I need to refer to the moon now and again I also check which phase it's at on whatever date.

I read about the pines getting munched by beetles and have noticed the orange patches. There was an article about the fires (Denver Post? I've got a lot of CO organisations on my Facebook feed as you never know what useful snippets you'll glean) where someone blamed environmentalist hippies for not letting the authorities clear out the dead wood because it would spoil the beetles' habitat. Hence a lot of tinder-dry fuel for the fires. The photos of the aspens in fall are stunning - I'd love to see them in real life (I'm a teacher - we get plenty of holiday, but can't choose when we take it, hence the summer visits).

Do people generally put snow tyres/chains on their cars in the cities/towns if they're not going into the mountains? Are all the roads in Denver kept clear of snow, or just the main roads? That's what happens here - they grit the main roads, but side roads only get done (if at all) if the snowy weather lasts for more than a few days. No snowploughs as we don't get snow every year so it's not worth the investment.

I noticed the light rail came to Golden in 2013. I'd intended to use it from there, but did the Coors tour and had the free samples. Didn't feel tipsy, but didn't dare drive to the station, so ended up getting the bus (16, I think) into Denver that day. Another day I drove to Sheridan and parked there.

Went to the Tattered Cover and bought myself a true crime book (a CO case, obviously) as light reading for an evening. I do love a good bookshop. I also went shopping at Cherry Creek (in the name of research - didn't buy much - haha!) as I wanted Bed Bath & Beyond. These beauties... http://www.seriouseats.com/images/20101216-128578-gadgets-cake-carrier.jpg ...are $30 in the US and the equivalent of ~$75 in the UK*. I'd been hankering after one for months! Nearby there's The Container Store - my anal retentiveness was in heaven in that place.

"Ooooooh, that's amazing! Where'd you get it?"
"Denver."
(Silence)

* Your bakeware and kitchen gadgets are so much better than ours.

How close do bears get to places like Golden? I saw one run across the road between Fairplay and Breckenridge - like I said, Colorado's wildlife needs lessons in pedestrian etiquette. ;) I've seen lots of mule deer pretty much everywhere (they give me the heebie jeebies), a few magnificent bushy-tailed foxes, elk near Evergreen (and in RMNP, and on I-70 (yuck)), a couple of moose (one humungous big daddy in the road near Berthoud Pass and a little girl in RMNP) and some fat chipmunks (so cute).

And... breathe!

Cheers again,

LPH.

CrastersBabies
08-31-2014, 07:14 PM
I'm baaaaack! Been sick, so was resting. And binge-watching Penny Dreadful. Anyhoo...


How's the area north of town going out towards 93 (Washington Street - North Ford Street area) regarded? This is a back way to Boulder, I believe, and takes you by Rocky Flats. (Standley Lake H.S. used to be called "Nuclear High" back when they built it. If I remember, they had this brand-spankin' new high school, but couldn't use it because they had radiation issues?) It's kind of hilly back road area. There are some very nice homes on the west side as you take that road north. You see a lot of this:

http://521.mlsimages.movoto.com/021/1217921_0.jpg

It's a nicer area. Lots of richie houses with steep driveways that go UP into the foothills and make you wonder how these people get out of their homes when it snows a lot.

crusties? Never heard that word here, but going to the wiki, I think of "hippie" and "granola head" and
Here's a fun article about Boulder hippies: http://www.elephantjournal.com/2011/09/get-your-crunch-on-the-6-species-of-boulder-hippies-brianna-bemel/

If Mr. Good Guy works in downtown and lives in the west part, he can take a sneaky way into work that doesn't involve the horror that is Denver traffic on the freeway. Normally, he'd take i-70 east (or 6th avenue) to I-25 and that would be awful. Like hurt-kittens-make-your-soul-cry awful. I found the "sneaky" way downtown. From Golden, you take 32nd Allllll the way to Speer BLVD then sneak downtown to any one of the major downtown cross streets. There are stop signs and traffic lights, but I could cut about 20 min. off the drive.

I used to live downtown. Learned to navigate it quickly. A LOT of people will drive to a lightrail center, park for free, and take the lightrail in for $2 instead of paying $16/day for parking. There are centers near downtown where you can park and do this.

Oh, and I've been to the Colorado Mills quite a few times. I remember when it was built. Before that was there, the area just had a strip mall (with a decent theater) and some tattoo shops. :) Now, it's nicey nice place. They had a carousel inside.


Don't forget the "People's Republic of Boulder," the name given to it by most others who don't live there. I don't know if the name is still popular now, but it definitely was in the 90s/early 2000s.

Oh yes, yes! This is so true.

Rain is weird here. I'm in Fort Collins (an hour drive north). It will rain around 3, cool off, get all wet, then warm up again and get muggy. Yay. (not). Also, don't forget the hail. Holy cow, the hail. Sudden. Scary. And flash floods.

Google "Denver hailstorm" and yeah. Look at those pictures. Also, more on weather--this is a pretty schizo state. Snow in the morning, 70s by 3pm. You'll see a lot of people wearing socks and sandals. And shorts in December. I've noticed that people would rather be cool than hot, hence the shorts and such at weird times. Or, like me, folks just wear layers frequently so you can strip down and cool off when needed.

And the snow here melts. We have a professor from Minnesota and he said, "Wow, the snow actually melts here."

And like SFMommy said, I can't remember when it rained all day. I think at the end of spring this year? It rained for a day or two. (But that would have been snow if it was cooler.) And I believe we had one of those "FU, I'm Colorado moments this year when it was May and snowed like 2 feet."

Agree with her as well on mountain weather. That seems to be an animal unto itself.

And forest fires. I work at a university where they have full-fledged (100s of people) teams and research groups dedicated to forest fires and how/why/how to mitigate, etc. I remember one summer where the sky was orange in the west. Like Mount Doom. I'm not kidding.

http://www.wildernessshots.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/5-high-park-fire-orange-ft-collins-sunset.jpg

It looks like sepia-toned everything. And you wake up with ash on your windshield.

Another thing that SFMommy brought up: Cherry Creek. The shopping district once housed the coolest bookstore in the WORLD. (Tattered Cover.) I believe they've moved that to Colfax. SFMommy might know. But Cherry Creek is a super artsy crafty area. The mall has expensive stores. Rich people live there. Even though the houses aren't great in some areas (2 bedrooms / 1 story, no AC), people pay like 400k and up because they want a Cherry Creek zip code.

(One thing I forgot to mention was that back when I went to Wheat Ridge HS, they called us "White Ridge" because we had one black student and two Asian students. We were considered a snobby, rich-kid school, even though we had a mixture of low-income, moderate-income and upper-income families. I think this has changed a bit with crime increasing somewhat in northeast areas. It will probably be a mixture still. And they are.... ready for this.... the Wheat Ridge FARMERS. Yes. Yes, that was my mascot. Something COOL, if Mr. Good Guy is an exercise person, they have the "Farmer 5000" every year. That's a pretty big marathon in Wheat Ridge.)

http://www.farmers5000.org/about/

On Boulder granola: could be the healthy kind, but I imagine there are "posers" there as well. :D

Celestial Seasonings in Boulder. That's a tea company. It's big there.

OUT OF TOWN BODY DUMP SITES

Hmmmm, pretty much any national park area will have some places. I don't hike, so someone else might have to answer that. Perhaps a search of "bodies found near/around Denver" might get you some results.


I was raised in WR - hi CrasterBaby whoever you are, went to DU and CU. Couple of notes I didn't see. There is a Purina factory as you drive along i-70; such a stink. The National Western Stock show is, or used to be, a big deal in January. Not only stock, but a rodeo.

HIIII!! Did you go to WRHS? I lived off 32nd and Kipling myself. Near Crown Hill Lake. (An awesome place to roller blade, I might add.)

YES, the Purina factory. (inhales DEEPLY.... yummm. NOT) And yes to the Western Stock show. Huge deal.

I LIKE BLUCIFER TOO!

FINALLY, including this fun thing that I found a while back. http://www.buzzfeed.com/awesomer/things-anyone-from-colorado-will-naturally-understand

Los Pollos Hermanos
08-31-2014, 09:14 PM
Glad you're feeling better!

Good articles - made me chuckle. From what I've seen and heard, I could quite happily live somewhere like Golden or Wheat Ridge, but Boulder would just be a nice place for a day out. I'm not sure I'm quite granola enough for the place. ;)

Mr Good Guy thanks you for the sneaky way to work. I tend to look for back ways if I think/know the main routes are going to be busy. Saving the $$ was the main reason I got the light rail/bus in, although it also served the purpose of letting me have a good look around my surroundings, which you can't really do when you're driving.

My googling tells me Colorado Mills was built in 2002. I think the earliest I refer to it is in 2008, but I'll double check during the edit. Somebody in Golden told me there's a foreign foods place nearby where her half-English boss stocks up on yummies from this side of the Pond. I've googled, but can't find reference to it.

I know they say everything's bigger in America, but those hailstones are ridiculous! Do they dent cars/damage property? ...just scrolled down... dented cars and houses with chunks knocked out of them. Ouch! How often do hailstorms like that roll in?

Yeah, Cherry Creek shopping mall was an exercise in wandering around thinking "How much?!" No wonder Mr Good Guy rolled his eyes when his missus mentioned stopping off there when he'd gone to a hospital* appointment! Apart from my magnifient cupcake carrier I found a lovely card for my parents' 40th wedding anniversary in Papyrus, but I'm one of those folks that likes to get a bargain at Colorado Mills or on a sale rail.

* The old St Anthony on Colfax, not the shiny new one which from memory I think is nearer Colorado Mills. Like the FBI field office was on Stout Street during this story, rather than that shiny new one they've moved into at Stapleton. AND when my first family fly into Denver in 1990, they arrive at the old Stapleton airport, rather than DIA. I do my research. :D Glad to find a fellow Blucifer fan.

My route from the La Quinta to Colfax used to take me down Kipling, so I'll have seen the park in passing. If you're driving south it's on the left I think? Seems like a nice quiet area around there, where the new in town mid-20s Mr Good Guy would like back in 2001.

Happy Sunday!

LPH.

CrastersBabies
09-01-2014, 09:18 PM
Glad you're feeling better!

Good articles - made me chuckle. From what I've seen and heard, I could quite happily live somewhere like Golden or Wheat Ridge, but Boulder would just be a nice place for a day out. I'm not sure I'm quite granola enough for the place. ;)

Me neither, but fun for a visit. It's a weird juxtaposition of granola-heads, hippies, and college students.


Mr Good Guy thanks you for the sneaky way to work. I tend to look for back ways if I think/know the main routes are going to be busy. Saving the $$ was the main reason I got the light rail/bus in, although it also served the purpose of letting me have a good look around my surroundings, which you can't really do when you're driving.I really liked taking the lightrail. I worked at times when it wasn't super crowded and I could get a window seat and just look/watch. If Mr. Good Guy takes the lightrail, he could park at the Broadway center (one of the biggest parking lots) and ride in to downtown. But that's a little out of the way. When I lived in WR, I just took 32nd avenue. My parking was paid for back then by the company. I only started taking the lightrail when I moved south of Denver.


My googling tells me Colorado Mills was built in 2002. I think the earliest I refer to it is in 2008, but I'll double check during the edit. Somebody in Golden told me there's a foreign foods place nearby where her half-English boss stocks up on yummies from this side of the Pond. I've googled, but can't find reference to it.Yep, 2002 sounds about right. It was a HUGE deal. And it's one of those malls that still seems to thrive--where many malls have gone the way of the dodo. Don't know about the foreign market, though. Hmmm. I know Asian markets off Federal and Mississippi (Little China) and Mexican markets off Federal and Evans (Little Mexico) and Persian/Middle Eastern/Indian markets that are off Broadway and Yale(ish). But I don't know Golden quite so well. I can ask. I have pals who graduated from Golden HS.


I know they say everything's bigger in America, but those hailstones are ridiculous! Do they dent cars/damage property? ...just scrolled down... dented cars and houses with chunks knocked out of them. Ouch! How often do hailstorms like that roll in? I'd say hail comes daily in Colorado in Spring and early Summer (May/June), but most of the time, they're just little pebbles that are here and gone in a few minutes. About once a week, you might get enough to make you run outside and pull your favorite potted flowers in to the garage for safety. Maybe once a month, you're raking up fallen leaves and branches in your backyard the day after. This year, though, has been super wet in Denver and Northern Colorado. We only had one super-hailstorm that dented cars.

Oh, and here's an interesting little blurb. The day after the BIG hailstorm here? We had at LEAST 15 roofing companies knocking on our door, asking if we needed an estimate for our potentially damaged roof. (Our roof wasn't damaged, but they try to sell you on that.) At least 15. The next day? 10 more. It's been THREE MONTHS and we still get 1-2 a week. We also get a lot of flyers on our car for dent removal for the hood of our car. It's annoying. We finally put a sign up saying, "We do not need a new roof," and the solicitors have stopped.


Yeah, Cherry Creek shopping mall was an exercise in wandering around thinking "How much?!" No wonder Mr Good Guy rolled his eyes when his missus mentioned stopping off there when he'd gone to a hospital* appointment! Apart from my magnifient cupcake carrier I found a lovely card for my parents' 40th wedding anniversary in Papyrus, but I'm one of those folks that likes to get a bargain at Colorado Mills or on a sale rail. Yep, that sounds very much like Cherry Creek. They do have sales now and then, but for the most part, no, I don't want to buy a $400 gold-plated fountain pen. :)


* The old St Anthony on Colfax, not the shiny new one which from memory I think is nearer Colorado Mills. It's not that close to Colorado Mills. There is a closer hospital. Lutheran. It's in WR.

http://www.lutheranmedicalcenter.org/

A very popular hospital, too. Takes most insurances. I lived in WR for many many years and never went to St. Anthony's. It was always Lutheran.


Like the FBI field office was on Stout Street during this story, rather than that shiny new one they've moved into at Stapleton. AND when my first family fly into Denver in 1990, they arrive at the old Stapleton airport, rather than DIA. I do my research. :D Glad to find a fellow Blucifer fan.I remember that FBI facility. Used to see the dog training park (and sometimes the dogs being trained). Didn't know they moved to Stapleton.

And yep, I remember flying from Stapleton as a teen. It was a fairly nice airport. That area has a new mega-mall now. Very nice little shops.

GO TEAM Bluficer! You know that Denver Bronco fans are fanatics, right? Like, do not talk smack about John Elway, or else. I worked at a telecommunications company back in the day. We sold cable channels to current subscribers. And one woman who worked there, well, she lived in a not-so-nice part of town. (5 Points) Her 3-year-old son was shot in the head by a drive-by. They weren't aiming at her or her house, but the bullet went through the window and struck her child. He miraculously survived. Had some trouble with motor skills for a bit, but recovered. When John Elway heard about this and heard that this woman's 3-year-old son was a big Broncos fan (and an Elway fan), he paid all of her hospital bills and bought her a new car. He's like a demi-god here in Denver.


My route from the La Quinta to Colfax used to take me down Kipling, so I'll have seen the park in passing. If you're driving south it's on the left I think? Seems like a nice quiet area around there, where the new in town mid-20s Mr Good Guy would like back in 2001. Actually, the best way to Colfax from La Quinta depends on where you want to go. If you want to go WEST, you take I-70 and it intersects with Colfax near Colorado Mills. If you want to go EAST on Colfax toward downtown Denver, you take Youngfield south. Past 32nd, past 26th, around a little bend and you're right there on Colfax. (That path also takes you past an amazing Mexican restaurant--Tafolino's. Mr. Tafolino started out making burritos for Bronco games, got enough money to buy a small shop in a strip mall, and did so well that he bought the whole mall.)

Marta
09-01-2014, 11:03 PM
Do people generally put snow tyres/chains on their cars in the cities/towns if they're not going into the mountains? Are all the roads in Denver kept clear of snow, or just the main roads? That's what happens here - they grit the main roads, but side roads only get done (if at all) if the snowy weather lasts for more than a few days. No snowploughs as we don't get snow every year so it's not worth the investment.
...
How close do bears get to places like Golden? I saw one run across the road between Fairplay and Breckenridge - like I said, Colorado's wildlife needs lessons in pedestrian etiquette. ;) I've seen lots of mule deer pretty much everywhere (they give me the heebie jeebies), a few magnificent bushy-tailed foxes, elk near Evergreen (and in RMNP, and on I-70 (yuck)), a couple of moose (one humungous big daddy in the road near Berthoud Pass and a little girl in RMNP) and some fat chipmunks (so cute).

Generally, the main streets get plowed first, and it's pretty efficient unless there's a major snow storn. Side streets can be messy until the snow melts, and places can stay icy a long time. But usually after a heavy storm, the plows do make it to side streets, just with a lower priority. If not much snow is on them, they might just get an application of gravel to improve traction and hasten melting. One small detail that might be useful to you: on the highway from Denver to Boulder, there's a high point before dropping down that gets high winds at times. After the highway has been treated with gravel, the dry gravel gets airborne by those winds, causing windshields to crack.

People I know got snow tires if they planned to do much driving in the mountains in the winter, but lots of people use chains for really bad weather (it's required to have one or the other during snowy periods in the mountains). Many people also rely on SUVs or Jeeps and don't necessarily use snow tires... though they've gotten stuck when ordinary cars carrying snow tires get through fine. Many people won't bother with snow tires if they're staying around town, which most years isn't an issue.

Bears are occasionally spotted as far east as Wheat Ridge. Foxes are pretty common, though lately they've suffered from mange.

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-02-2014, 02:18 AM
Double-big thanks to you both!

Bears in Wheat Ridge?! Eeek! I've got a scene where someone gets home and finds one on their porch - but that's in Paradise Hills. Someone in Estes Park told me that a 300+lb bear strolled into a downtown bar through the back door - the bartender flicked a towel at it and it turned round and strolled back out. Madness! The most savage wildlife I've seen in the past few weeks is a couple of hedgehogs (Mrs Tiggywinkle & Spiny Norman).

I've never driven directly from Denver to Boulder (or the other way) - just Wheat Ridge - Golden - Boulder and return. However, that windy business is a good snippet to drop into conversation. Same with the roofers trying to scam about hail damage - I'll double check any spring-ish dates during the edit and see if I can find reference to any bad hailstorms in the previous few days. Our hail is never more than pea-sized.

Mr Good Guy has parking at work, nuch to his relief (English people really begrudge paying for parking - we get so ripped off over here!). When I put directions into google maps for from the La Quinta to the city, it suggested the "Tafolino way" (now on my list of yummies for next time), but I went by Kipling to see more of the 'burbs.

The Broncos are mentioned in passing, in that any Denver cops/Feds talking sport are fans. I wore a pair of Broncos socks on Superbowl day (am I a jinx?!) - I know nothing about (American) football, but I had to buy a pair of Broncos socks - haha! That was such a lovely gesture by John Elway, and glad to hear the little boy made a good recovery.

Cheers for heads up on the hospital. The reason I initially went for the old St Anthony's is because it's closer to his workplace. He got rushed there from his workplace (not as bad as it looked, but his boss called 911 straight away). His missus had dropped him off at work that day and went off to Cherry Creek to treat herself and their then-unborn second child to something nice, with the intention of having lunch and then picking up hubby a few hours later. Therefore I used St Anthony's again when there was a different hospital scene, although Lutherian would be more conveniently located for what I want and has the relevant departments - I shall deal with it during the edit. The pre-arranged hospital appointment is yet another scene - had a brain-fart.

Cheers again,

LPH.

Hoplite
09-02-2014, 08:55 PM
Some brewery information in Golden:

-You can take the "express" tour of Coors Brewing to go straight to the free taste center. It's popular for people on a budget or for some free drink after work/class (students from School of Mines in particular; of which my wife belongs)

-Golden City Brewery (GCB) is by far more popular for after-classes drinks. It's a small shack and a beer garden.

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-02-2014, 09:51 PM
They don't mind giving away free beer for those who haven't been on the tour?! Don't tell the English! :D We have Coors Lite* over here, but the water comes from Staffordshire (I'm sure I read that somewhere).

Is there anywhere in town which gives away free margarita/mojito*?! I'll make a note for next time...

* Do the locals refer to it as Colorado Kool-Aid, or is it a media term?

** My roadtrippin' tipples of choice.

Cheers,

LPH.

asroc
09-02-2014, 10:13 PM
I wore a pair of Broncos socks on Superbowl day (am I a jinx?!) - I know nothing about (American) football, but I had to buy a pair of Broncos socks - haha!

LPH.

Seattle thanks you.

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-03-2014, 12:21 AM
Haha!

I spent two days in Seattle a couple of summers ago and it didn't rain once. Nothing like on The Killing... ;)

tiddlywinks
09-03-2014, 09:27 AM
Ah, this makes me nostalgic and wishing I still lived back in CO. Instead, I now live somewhere in which I can commiserate with CrastersBabies' Professor: Your snow melts. *sigh*

Los Pollos, I don't know how much you actually have set in RMNP and Estes, but feel free to ping me if I might help. That was my old stomping grounds (albeit a few decades ago), and I still visit/hike there on a regular basis.

Just a couple of random goodies before I turn in for the night:
- The elk bugling in the fall in the park (eerie, yet beautiful)
- late at night, coming home from the valley, you might occasionally see a mountain lion (but very rare)
- The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park was used as the location for Stephen King's film, The Shining
- Long's Peak is a 14teener in the park that is doable without climbing equipment (and you have some fun campsites like "Goblin's Forest")
- You can always tell a local versus a tourist driving up and down the mountains from how they ride their break the entire time (or don't shift into a different gear), as well as how they break during turns rather than into the turn
- All kinds of gorgeous hikes in the park (especially in fall when the aspen turn that gold for sometimes an all too brief period before the winds strip them). Many beautiful lakes if you want to depart from the crowds a little and work for your view beyond Bear Lake and other front country spots
- an old fashioned salt water taffy shop in the main street touristy section with taffy pulled right in the front window.

Thanks to the other folks for sharing!

Hoplite
09-03-2014, 07:03 PM
They don't mind giving away free beer for those who haven't been on the tour?! Don't tell the English! :D We have Coors Lite* over here, but the water comes from Staffordshire (I'm sure I read that somewhere).

Is there anywhere in town which gives away free margarita/mojito*?! I'll make a note for next time...

* Do the locals refer to it as Colorado Kool-Aid, or is it a media term?

** My roadtrippin' tipples of choice.

Cheers,

LPH.

You have to drive up to the entry shack (not take the bus tour) and request "the fast tour". You'll be given a paper slip that you hand to the tourist info counter inside and you head straight to the tasting room.

Sorry, I don't know about any free margaritas/mojitos.

I've never heard of Coors Lite referred to to as "Colorado Kool-aid", but I've only been living in Colorado since 2010.

Myrealana
09-03-2014, 07:12 PM
I've never heard of Coors Lite referred to to as "Colorado Kool-aid", but I've only been living in Colorado since 2010.
I'm going to second never having heard Coors called "Colorado Kool-aid."

I remember when Coors was only available in the Rocky Mountain Region. My mom's relatives would request cases when we drove to Missouri for family reunions.

CrastersBabies
09-03-2014, 07:17 PM
I also have never heard of Coors being referred to as "Colorado Kool-Aid."

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-03-2014, 08:17 PM
I'm not sure where I first read about "Colorado Kool-Aid", but it shows up on google and was apparently also a song.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Colorado%20Kool-Aid

This my kind of Kool-Aid:

http://www.americangrocery.co.uk/ekmps/shops/vmadhu/images/kool-aid-liquid-grape-liquid-48ml-1313-p.jpg

Those crafty little bottles meant I could bring some synthetic grapey goodness back over here. :D

Estes Park/RMNP are more for days out/weekends away - the latter is too busy to make a good body dump site!

I've seen elk lurking around, but the rut seems to start after I've left. Great video clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOaJ-wbMoRM

Did the ghost tour at The Stanley back in 2010 - The Shining was the first Stephen King book I read circa age 14 so I'd wanted to see the place for a while. Too much of a wimp to stay there though! The elk meatloaf was delicious, btw.

Didn't see the taffy shop - probably because I was too busy dodging the tourists! ;)

I drive a manual (stick shift?) car, so am used to using lower gears to slow down and maintain a lower speed downhill. The last thing I wanted was for overheated brakes on Mt Evans or the like!

Cheers,

LPH.

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-10-2014, 12:50 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/29116411

I'm not sure if this video will play outside the UK, but there wasn't a sniff of granola (just some tasty looking pizza)...

:D

Jack Asher
09-10-2014, 02:52 AM
About the little rain. In college we always knew who came from out of state - they had umbrellas. I never owned one in all the years I lived there.

Seconded. The only Coloradans with umbrella's are transplants. I've never owned one, but my grandma did. It sat in her glove box for thirty years and was never used.

Now if I were going to get rid of a body I would go up the South St Vrain, Northwest of Lyons. The river is turgid there, and there are pull offs for people to fish and kayak. On weekend nights these pull offs are full of teenagers watching the submarine races, which I can tell you are spectacular.

But if you dropped a body into the water it would get bashed to pieces by the rocks, till the cops weren't sure what had happened to him.

Oh, and people may use "republic of boulder," but I've always liked, "nine square miles surrounded by reality."

And bears are prevalent but don't forget mountain lions! They manage to take down a jogger on the front range every five years or so. Bears are really only a threat when you surprise them, or corner them. Cougars will stalk you, and if you are distracted (read: on your iPod) they won't hesitate.

Edited to Add: Why has no one brought up Casa Bonita yet!

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-10-2014, 08:58 AM
I saw Casa Bonita on South Park* back in the day and was gobsmacked that it actually existed. I contemplated going last summer, but apparently the food is dire (apart from the soppapillas?? sp?).

* I went to Fairplay in 2010. Had to be done. Beefcaaaaaaaaake!

Thanks for the river option - sounds like a good place to get rid of those annoying bodies which have a tendency to clutter up the place!

Would you get mountain lions actually in towns (e.g. Golden) or do they tend to stick to the more rural areas? I think I saw a dead one beside Route 93 when I was driving from Golden to Boulder, but I didn't look that closely.

I always carry a brolly (umbrella) with me, but that's a prerequisite of being a UK citizen. I need to buy a new one as it's about to collapse through being well-used. :D

Cheers,

LPH.

Rhymes with Clue
09-10-2014, 12:24 PM
You are probably not going to get mountain lions in downtown Denver but they have been seen in suburban places like Morrison, Lone Tree, and Golden.There is urban Golden and there is less urban Golden. You'll see the cats mostly in the foothills, except they are very good at hiding so you won't see them. But they will see you.

No umbrellas except non-natives? This is crazy talk. They keep off snow as well as rain and you see lots of them. (I have not done a poll or asked people with umbrellas where they came from, and there are a lot of non-natives here, but there also are a lot of umbrellas. In fact most of the people I know are non-natives. But my husband is a 3rd-generation Denver native and while he doesn't have an umbrella now, he's had and lost a lot of them. Leaving them on the bus is the usual excuse.)

The food at Casa Bonita is dire. It is not just not-good, it is sickening. Although there are people who eat it, and probably even people who say they like it. You have to pay for a meal (all you can eat, a thought sickening in itself in this case) to get in, but fortunately you don't have to eat it! If you want sopaipillas there are other places to get them. For one, Little Anita's. (They are a New Mexican thing, not a Mexican thing, although you do see them at Mexican restaurants.)

There is a summertime thing where it tends to rain--usually not much--almost every day just about the time people are getting off work. Usually a light sprinkle. You can hear thunder and see lightning in one direction or another almost every night in summer.

I know there are some big differences between 1986 and 2009 but it's mostly along the lines of landmarks that have disappeared, and now that they're gone the places seem like different places. Speaking only of Denver, in the Cherry Creek area in 1986 there were mostly what would be called starter homes--two bedrooms, one bath, maybe a basement, a yard, maybe a fireplace. Very functional, not at all posh, but comfortable and affordable. In 1986 they were mostly owned by people who had lived in them for years and liked being close to Cherry Creek, which was a happening place, or they were holding onto them for investment. Now they have mostly been replaced by very expensive condo buildings, duplexes, and large houses. There is much less yard. Every once in a while there is still a little modest house which means someone is still holding on for appreciation.

Denver winters--ah, snow. It can snow a lot, but if it's in a place where it gets sun it will also melt quickly. If it's in an area of tall buildings, it will not melt quickly. (There ought to be some solar surcharge if you block the sun from the street because those streets will get the kind of ruts you can't get out of, and those ruts stay there long after other streets have cleared. So, of course, a week after the snow you can be driving along on a perfectly dry street and then quite suddenly you're on black ice.)

The Cherry Cricket is a GREAT hamburger joint in Cherry Creek. It was there in 1986 and it's there today. (And hopefully will be there tomorrow, next year, etc.)

There are a lot of good places to dump a body, even in town.

I think the biggest change between '86 and '09 is all the development of LoDo. In the mid-'80s there were old warehouses, empty lots, the train station (which had a restaurant that looked like it had been there since the '30s), railroad tracks, the post office Terminal Annex, and a couple of edgy dance clubs. By '09 there were microbreweries, bars (lots of bars), condos, lofts, new office space, Coors Field, Pepsi Center, Elitch's, a skateboard park. What was a lone bike path along the river is now a teeming urban environment. A place called My Brother's Bar, which was always good but used tobe often deserted is now very, very popular, still has no TVs, and plays classical music. (I may be stretching the boundaries of LoDo here.)

Odd fact I have noticed in the last few years. In any office I've worked at since, say, 1990, let's say out of 10 people 2 will live in Denver proper (by which I mean City & County of), 2 will live some totally outrageous distance away (Evergreen, Greeley, Windsor, Colorado Springs, Cheyenne [yes, really]), and the rest think they live in Denver but actually live in Aurora, Highlands Ranch, Centennial, Littleton, Englewood, Lakewood, Westminster, Thornton, Broomfield, Wheat Ridge, Commerce City or some similar suburb.

Jack Asher
09-10-2014, 11:03 PM
No umbrellas except non-natives? This is crazy talk. They keep off snow as well as rain and you see lots of them. (I have not done a poll or asked people with umbrellas where they came from, and there are a lot of non-natives here, but there also are a lot of umbrellas. In fact most of the people I know are non-natives. But my husband is a 3rd-generation Denver native and while he doesn't have an umbrella now, he's had and lost a lot of them. Leaving them on the bus is the usual excuse.)
I make it a point to ask every umbrella carrier I ever see if they are from Colorado, and the answer is universally "no." I have never seen one in the snow.

The really biggest change is the Denver Tech Center in southern Aurora/Englewood. In the past 10 years it's bloomed into a sprawling office utopia, where rent is cheap, and little fountains are everywhere. There's a huge move from downtown Denver into the Tech Center, the companies that stay are for the most part financial. The bigger companies like to be able to have parking lots.

The most important weather information you can possibly have is this: Our default setting is sunny. It can be warm and sunny, it can be cold and sunny, it can be windy and sunny. Last year we had a whole week in the negatives and the sun shone every day. We get 300 days of sunshine a year, kind of like an anti-England*. Sometimes it snows or rains or hails, but when the weather resets to default at night it's Sunny again in the morning.

*The assumption would have to be that if our two regions were to touch they'd create and explosion large enough to annihilate the solar system

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-12-2014, 08:38 PM
300 days of sunshine a year sounds heavenly.

** Glances out of the window and notes the grey sky **
(but it's not rained for nearly two weeks - what's wrong?!)

I got a magnificent tan in Colorado last summer by just strolling around - I still had strap marks on my shoulders in March/April. I'm not usually vain, but I've got quite sallow skin (Dad's is olive, Mum's is uber-pale and I'm a weird combo) and the only time I don't look like a corpse is when I've got a bit of a tan.

Would you see mountain lions in Paradise Hills (one of my settings)? I saw a few psychotic looking mule deer* around there, but no overgrown kitties. Do they eat domestic pets?!

* they give me the heebie jeebies - you can tell they're contemplating jumping out in front of your car!

I might make reference to somebody's stag do/hen do (bachelor/bachelorette party?????) starting at Casa Bonita. I had sopaipillas in Santa Fe last summer, but didn't realise they were New Mexican until I mentioned them to a Mexican colleague who'd never heard of them.

I saw the Cherry Cricket on Man-v-Food --- I love a good burger (we do get them here, but you have to know where to go) and sweet potato fries. Next time I'm in town I'm going to brave the Rocky Mountain Oysters! ;)

The owner of a hotel I stayed at in Cody, WY told me that her sister (in-law -- I think) is a doctor and commutes daily from Cheyenne to Denver and back. Ouch! It was bad enough when I did north Preston to south Manchester daily in the late 90s (90 mile round trip), but she really did have the commute from hell -- and survived a muley deciding to run out in front of her car* on I-25 in the dark.

* told you they're psychotic!

Cheers for the additional CO goodies,

LPH.

Jack Asher
09-12-2014, 11:32 PM
Would you see mountain lions in Paradise Hills (one of my settings)? I saw a few psychotic looking mule deer* around there, but no overgrown kitties. Do they eat domestic pets?!
Well as mentioned you probably wouldn't see them, but they are there. One of my grandfather's friends living in Boulder Heights heard a noise on his porch one night. Absentmindedly snapped a picture though the porch window and went back to bed. When he got the film developed he found a picture of a cougar dragging a dear carcass across his lawn.

It's interesting that you bring up the pets thing. My aunt recently lost one of her dogs to a mountain lion. He didn't come back one night and when they went looking for him they found his body half eaten and half buried. Cougar's bury their kills and come back for them later.

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-13-2014, 02:06 PM
Haha! T'was a rushed reply between getting in from work and going out again. I meant to say "Do you get mountain lions in Paradise Hills?" but my fat fingers had a mind of their own.

Poor pooch, and your poor aunt finding him like that. Are there ever incidents of people in rural areas taking out the trash (or similar) late at night and getting attacked? Joggers/hikers have been mentioned. I'm glad the most savage wildlife on my road are the local cats and the occasional hedgehog!

Casa Bonita's food - is it dire as in just tastes dire, or dire as in it'll give you Montezuma's revenge for a few days after you've eaten it? My colleague has told me where to get proper "cooked like my grandmother used to" Mexican food in Manchester - next time I'm in the city centre I'm going for a feast!

Cheers,

LPH.

Flounder32
09-13-2014, 05:01 PM
Haha! T'was a rushed reply between getting in from work and going out again. I meant to say "Do you get mountain lions in Paradise Hills?" but my fat fingers had a mind of their own.

Poor pooch, and your poor aunt finding him like that. Are there ever incidents of people in rural areas taking out the trash (or similar) late at night and getting attacked? Joggers/hikers have been mentioned. I'm glad the most savage wildlife on my road are the local cats and the occasional hedgehog!

Casa Bonita's food - is it dire as in just tastes dire, or dire as in it'll give you Montezuma's revenge for a few days after you've eaten it? My colleague has told me where to get proper "cooked like my grandmother used to" Mexican food in Manchester - next time I'm in the city centre I'm going for a feast!

Cheers,

LPH.

Casa Bonita's food is just awful. It wouldn't make you sick like Montezuma's revenge, it just tastes bad and might give you a tummy ache. It's like going to 7-11 and buying a frozen burrito and heating it up in the microwave. It's not really Mexican food. The only time a local might go there would be to bring an out of town visitor who really wants to do the tourist thing.

I'm sorry to hear you had a bad experience in Texas. As a native Texan and someone who went to school in Colorado for years, I can say that generally Texans and Coloradans are friendly. Native Coloradans do have a slight aversion to Texans that transplant up there, but Texans in general share no animosity towards Coloradans or anyone really except for maybe the Okies. Hopefully you'll give Texas another try sometime. Colorado has us beat on the beauty of the great outdoors, but they can't touch our great Mexican food! :)

And a note about The Shining. The novel was written by King after a 1974 visit to the Stanley Hotel, but none of the movie was actually filmed there.

"After having chosen Stephen King's novel The Shining as a basis for his next project, and after a pre-production phase, Kubrick had sets constructed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_construction) on soundstages at EMI Elstree Studios (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elstree_Studios#EMI_and_others) in Borehamwood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borehamwood), Hertfordshire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertfordshire), Britain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain) – to enable chronological filming and changes during production, he used several stages at EMI Elstree Studios in order to make all sets available during the complete duration of production. The set for the Overlook Hotel was then the largest ever built at Elstree, including a life-size re-creation of the exterior of the hotel.[14] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shining_%28film%29#cite_note-14) Some of the interior designs of the Overlook Hotel set are notable for being based on those of the Ahwahnee Hotel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahwahnee_Hotel) in Yosemite National Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yosemite_National_Park). While most of the interior shots, and even some of the Overlook exterior shots were done on studio sets, a few exterior shots were done on location by a second-unit crew headed by Jan Harlan: Saint Mary Lake (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Mary_Lake) with its Wild Goose Island was the filming location for the aerial shots (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerial_shot) of the opening scene.[15] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shining_%28film%29#cite_note-15) The Timberline Lodge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timberline_Lodge) on Mount Hood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Hood) in Oregon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon) was filmed for a few of the exterior shots of the fictional Overlook Hotel, and notably absent in these shots is the hedge maze – a nonexistent feature at the Timberline Lodge." -source wikipedia

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-13-2014, 06:24 PM
You can't beat authentic regional/international grub. I generally won't eat takeaway/supermarket Indian food, as I've worked with a lot of British-Indians and British-Pakistanis over the past fifteen years. Their homemade traditional food is nothing like the takeaway/supermarket stuff AND is so much nicer. My colleague said she'd give me some traditional Mexican recipes for when I order some supplies from an online supplier - I'll have a go at making my very own black bean burritos and huevos rancheros!

I have to say that of the week I spent in Texas, San Antonio was okay. Dallas and Houston (especially the latter) were horrific, but that's another issue. On my first night in TX I went to the Big Texan in Amarillo and had a chicken fried steak - food won! :D

The Shining was the first Stephen King book I read. I've seen the television mini series filmed at the Stanley, but in 2012 I did a NW roadtrip (with three days north of the border) and whilst passing through Oregon made a minor detour en route from Klamath Falls to Hood River so I could see the Timberline Lodge. A few days later I drove the Going to the Sun Road which is in the film's opening sequence. I like to complete the set!

I've worked out where to mention Casa Bonita when I add it in during my current edit.

Cheers,

LPH.

Jack Asher
09-15-2014, 12:06 AM
My wife reminds me about Cheesman Park (https://www.google.com/maps/place/Cheesman+Park,+Denver,+CO/@39.7340914,-104.9661065,16z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x876c7ec9191d6ea5:0x3b2dc74401f57 1df) in the capital hill area. It's a beautiful park in the day time, and a great place to pick up a hooker, or get stabbed, at night.

But it wasn't always like that. You remember a while back when that guy got on a plane with super-tuberculosis? They took him to National Jewish Hospital off of Colfax and Colorado. The dry and cool air of the mountains are great conditions to treat consumption, and Colorado has been the go to vacation spot for 150 years or so. (That's actually why my great grandmother came out here.)

Back on track, Cheesman Park wasn't always a park, for 60 years it was Prospect Hill Cemetary, which actually covered much more then the Cheesman Park area of today. It was used primarily for the unclaimed bodies of tuberculosis victims, whose families couldn't afford to ship their remains back to where ever they came from. They dug up most of the bodies when the changed it into a park in 1907, but the "population" of the cemetary was over 5,000 so it's much more then likely that they missed a few.

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-16-2014, 09:14 PM
Sit down for a picnic in the park and a hand pops up to grab your sandwich?

I've read about a ghost on 93 north of Golden:

http://www.examiner.com/article/haunted-highways-golden-colorado-highway-93-the-fading-ghost

That gets mentioned in the story (by teenagers).

We had something similar when I lived down south:

http://www.courier.co.uk/ghastly-ghouls-rumoured-haunt-sleepy-district/story-12005523-detail/story.html

We used to drive up and down Gracious Lane and I lived less than a mile from that A25/M25 junction. Headless horses were also supposed to gallop down my road in the middle of the night!

Can't beat teenage speculation - in any part of the world!

ScienceFictionMommy
09-27-2014, 01:59 AM
Sorry to disappear for so long, we had some big stuff going on. Are there any unanswered questions you were still wondering about here?

Los Pollos Hermanos
09-30-2014, 09:17 PM
Cheers for the offer. Nothing specific, but random is always a good option! :D

CrastersBabies
10-01-2014, 03:06 AM
Lots of ghosty places in Idaho Springs and Georgetown too. :)

Teenagers in Denver might know about the Abandoned girl's school in Boulder. We used to sneak in when I was in high school. There was a fire and some of the girls died inside the building. (It's probably been demolished since, though...)

Jack Asher
10-01-2014, 12:03 PM
Lots of ghosty places in Idaho Springs and Georgetown too.
Don't forget Gilman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilman,_Colorado)

I don't remember an abandoned girls school in Boulder, and considering property values in The Republic I'd be very surprised if the site hadn't been built over, razed, built again, demolished, zoned for residential, turned into an attractive condominium complex, imminent domain'd by the city, zoned industrial (for an RTD train depot), declined by the RTD, demolished, and turned into a dog park.

Folks in Boulder sure do like their dog parks.

Los Pollos Hermanos
10-01-2014, 09:18 PM
If I ever set up a small business in Boulder, it'll be selling granola in a dog park!

Are there any haunted dog parks in The Republic?!

:D

Jack Asher
10-02-2014, 03:25 AM
That had better be organic, free range, no pesticides, carbon neutral, gluten-free granola; or you'll never be able to compete.

Los Pollos Hermanos
10-04-2014, 10:48 PM
Lucky Charms in Golden it is then! Followed by a late lunch at D'Deli... :D

Los Pollos Hermanos
10-05-2014, 01:54 PM
A few more BBC Pop Up clips:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-29470453

(related links to the right)