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tianaluthien
08-15-2014, 02:40 AM
...and I'm not actually referring to the totally amazing film starring Jennifer Connelly and David Bowie. At the moment

In the novel I'm working on, there is a forest that is an ever-changing labyrinth surrounding the castle my character needs to find. Keep in mind, she doesn't know she needs to find it. (OK, this is vague, I know) Does anyone know where I could find information on ways to get through a labyrinth? Ideally concepts that have roots in mythology, fairy tales, or folklore, ideally...

WeaselFire
08-15-2014, 02:47 AM
String, dropping Jelly Beans, magic wand and the "get me out of the labyrinth" spell... About any way you can imagine could be worked into the story. If it's ever-changing though, you need magic or luck. Or Harry Potter looking for some goblet. Or a weed whacker.

Jeff

King Neptune
08-15-2014, 02:52 AM
Labyrinths are designed so that there is no single method for geing through them. There was the bit about the labyrinth around the temple at someone's country house in the novel Lammas Night
http://www.amazon.com/Lammas-Night-Katherine-Kurtz/dp/0345295161 : It was, "Always stay with the right." Or something like that.

The "ever changing" part makes it a little more difficult.

Jaymz Connelly
08-15-2014, 02:57 AM
I found this...

http://cathannabel.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/labyrinths-and-mazes-finding-and-losing-the-thread/

and also this which is about finding your way out of a maze...

http://www.perfectingparenthood.com/content/how-escape-any-maze-blindfolded-family-trapped-corn-maze-last-week

I like the idea that it could be that easy to find your way out of a maze... provided you know that tip or are clever enough to figure it out.

HistoryLvr
08-15-2014, 03:08 AM
There's an easy way to get through any common labyrinth or maze, by putting your hand on one side and following the wall/edge until you eventually come to the end. I'm not sure if this helps you, but it is something I've done in corn mazes and the like.

tianaluthien
08-15-2014, 03:23 AM
I found this...

http://cathannabel.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/labyrinths-and-mazes-finding-and-losing-the-thread/


This is super helpful, thank you!

And Jeff, if all else fails I will totally have her use a weed whacker. ;)

Thank you everyone...you guys are fast. Cookies all 'round!

poetinahat
08-15-2014, 03:42 AM
Just a thought: if it's ever-changing, could the answer be to stay in one place? As long as the changes are continuous, is the spot you're going to any more likely to be closer to the end than where you are right now?

tianaluthien
08-15-2014, 06:09 AM
Just a thought: if it's ever-changing, could the answer be to stay in one place? As long as the changes are continuous, is the spot you're going to any more likely to be closer to the end than where you are right now?

That's something I hadn't thought of and a very interesting idea. I'm gonna add that to the pot and let it simmer.

:Thumbs:

Elly_Green
08-16-2014, 03:02 AM
Did you know that the original answer to the problem of a Labyrinth was a "clew"?

A clew, in the original Greek, meant a ball of yarn/thread. Thus, in the myth of the Minotaur and the Labyrinth, Ariadne went to Daedalus and asked him to help her save Theseus from his fate. Daedalus's response was to hand her a ball of yarn from his worktable. When she handed it to Theseus, I can only imagine his quizzical look. Obviously, he figured out its use because he does escape.

But, in the end, "clew" eventually became "clue" and thus, in order to escape a maze of labyrinthine twists and turns, you need a clue.

Not at all helpful to what you were asking, but it is the best answer I have for you right now AND it includes mythology...

wendymarlowe
08-17-2014, 08:18 PM
Did you know that the original answer to the problem of a Labyrinth was a "clew"?

A clew, in the original Greek, meant a ball of yarn/thread. Thus, in the myth of the Minotaur and the Labyrinth, Ariadne went to Daedalus and asked him to help her save Theseus from his fate. Daedalus's response was to hand her a ball of yarn from his worktable. When she handed it to Theseus, I can only imagine his quizzical look. Obviously, he figured out its use because he does escape.

But, in the end, "clew" eventually became "clue" and thus, in order to escape a maze of labyrinthine twists and turns, you need a clue.

Not at all helpful to what you were asking, but it is the best answer I have for you right now AND it includes mythology...

This has put "Blue's Clues" in a whole new light for me :-D

Dennis E. Taylor
08-17-2014, 10:59 PM
Just a thought: if it's ever-changing, could the answer be to stay in one place? As long as the changes are continuous, is the spot you're going to any more likely to be closer to the end than where you are right now?

Actually, if the changes happen often enough (as opposed to once a week), you can just stand and wait for the patch in front of you to vanish, then step forward. Rinse and repeat, until you're at the other end.

robjvargas
08-18-2014, 05:13 AM
Borrowing from the Minotaur myth, if you use a string or other solid marker like that, what if the labyrinth won't change because the string activates a "no-kill" safety, or something like that?

ScienceFictionMommy
08-18-2014, 07:40 AM
Hansel and Gretyl used stones and breadcrumbs.

I'm a fan of the one-hand on-the wall technique, although if the objective isn't just to get out/get through, but to reach some destination in the middle, it's possible for this to not work (the wall for the inside portion may never connect to the outside wall, although this would mean there's a path all the way around the perimeter.) Of course, if the labyrinth is changing, all bets are off.

FYI:

The first task is to clarify the difference between a labyrinth and a maze. While the terms are often used interchangeably, many historians and enthusiasts are passionate about which is which...in the English-speaking world it is often considered that to qualify as a maze, a design must have choices in the pathway...Popular consensus also indicates that labyrinths have one pathway that leads inexorably from the entrance to the goal, albeit often by the most complex and winding of routes.

Labyrinths are supposed to be more about the journey, particularly in mythology.

http://www.labyrinthos.net/typology.html

Reziac
09-03-2014, 07:03 PM
My experience is mostly from DOOM, where hundreds of levels have mazes (some quite extensive) -- with and without attacks enroute, some where "Right turn, Clyde" will NOT get you anywhere, and some that change as you go (often radically). There is no One True Way. Rather, I develop a feel for the maze as I go.

If it's a straightforward left-hand-on-the-wall maze, this will become evident fairly quick. Mazes with "islands", tho, will defeat that strategy -- you'll either never get there or will just go in circles. If there are enemies in the maze, a maze with islands or shifting walls is orders of magnitude more dangerous, as they have more opportunity to get you from behind or suddenly swarm you from all directions. Conversely in a single-wall or nonshifting maze you can clean up the opposition as you go, but you are also more likely to get cornered in a dead end.

Another trick is to have the maze itself be the danger -- in DOOM this is usually done with crushing ceilings or exploding barrels (and occasionally surprise teleports with unknown destinations), but "stinging bushes" and "how the hell did I just get here?" would work perfectly well in a woodsy fantasy maze.

Sometimes the maze is partly transparent or made up largely of pillars or trees, which can make it hell to navigate (often the more you can see through it, the more confusing it gets) and makes you a target from all directions all the time.

Occasionally there are breadcrumbs (in DOOM you pick them up, so where they're gone is where you've already been), which may or may not be useful for navigation, and occasionally function as bait.

And very often you don't know what the goal is til you get there, or may have only the clues that derive from being familiar with the game.

I can see any or all of these being applied to a shifting forest maze, depending on how you want things to go... and how far you wish to try her patience (and how much she has). What lives in the maze? is it useful, or dangerous? is she an experienced woodsman, or a townie without a clue? How well-equipped is she? can she go back and get stuff she needs, or is she stuck with what she's carrying? Does she get frustrated and just start hacking at the bushes, or does she patiently camp and (as someone suggested) wait for things to settle out?

What was the question? :)