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Chekurtab
07-11-2014, 01:21 AM
I need someone familiar with the police procedural. My detective needs to change cars ASAP. Any excuse would do. Whom in the precinct does he talk to? What kind of paperwork is involved?
Thanks.

cmhbob
07-11-2014, 02:00 AM
If you don't have access to Lee Lofland's book on police procedures (http://www.amazon.com/Police-Procedure-Investigation-Writers-Howdunit/dp/1582974551/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1327291340&sr=1-1), try very hard to find a copy of it. Very helpful.

Why the need for speed? Was the old unit damaged in a crash, etc? Don't forget the paperwork, and possible hospitalization.

Most departments have a pool of unmarked cars for plainclothes officers to use. Access is usually controlled by the officers at the front desk, or the precinct or watch commander, who is usually a lieutenant at least.

elinor
07-11-2014, 02:18 AM
If you don't have access to Lee Lofland's book on police procedures (http://www.amazon.com/Police-Procedure-Investigation-Writers-Howdunit/dp/1582974551/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1327291340&sr=1-1), try very hard to find a copy of it. Very helpful.

I have that one and the Forensics one. Both are great books.

WeaselFire
07-11-2014, 01:26 PM
What department? Do they have a motor pool? In a small police department, it's as easy as telling the shift commander you're swapping cars. In one with a motor pool, there are signatures and paperwork.

Now, what do you need to happen for your story? And why is changing cars such a big deal? What's wrong with:

Detective Cat Ocelot stopped at the station and swapped her brand new unmarked Dodge Charger for one of the department's confiscated vehicles used for undercover work. She had driven the crumbling Chevy Nova during some drug buys four years ago and swore it still had the same carpet stain where a drunk had vomited in it back then. At least the odor melted into the stale, musty and slightly sweet rankness she was used to.

Jeff

Chekurtab
07-11-2014, 11:58 PM
Thanks for the replies, everyone.

What department? Do they have a motor pool? In a small police department, it's as easy as telling the shift commander you're swapping cars. In one with a motor pool, there are signatures and paperwork.

Now, what do you need to happen for your story? And why is changing cars such a big deal? What's wrong with:

Detective Cat Ocelot stopped at the station and swapped her brand new unmarked Dodge Charger for one of the department's confiscated vehicles used for undercover work. She had driven the crumbling Chevy Nova during some drug buys four years ago and swore it still had the same carpet stain where a drunk had vomited in it back then. At least the odor melted into the stale, musty and slightly sweet rankness she was used to.

Jeff

This is NYPD we're talking about. My detective guy wants a different car to follow a suspect.
Thanks, Jeff.

WeaselFire
07-12-2014, 01:28 AM
This is NYPD we're talking about. My detective guy wants a different car to follow a suspect.
That's an easy answer then, call them and ask. The Public Information office fields about a zillion questions from writers every day.

Jeff

Heathertruett
07-19-2014, 10:09 PM
It may help you to get a police contact. For my last book, I called the Sheriff. He set me up a meeting with a criminal investigator. Awesome man. He has answered random questions for me via email. He took me on a tour of the county jail and walked me step by step through my character's arrest and interview process, etc… He printed me the forms he uses for statements and rules of conduct, visitation, etc...

Chekurtab
07-20-2014, 12:31 AM
It may help you to get a police contact. For my last book, I called the Sheriff. He set me up a meeting with a criminal investigator. Awesome man. He has answered random questions for me via email. He took me on a tour of the county jail and walked me step by step through my character's arrest and interview process, etc… He printed me the forms he uses for statements and rules of conduct, visitation, etc...

Good idea, Heathertruett. Too bad, I don't know any cops, New York or elsewhere.

Heathertruett
07-20-2014, 08:41 PM
Good idea, Heathertruett. Too bad, I don't know any cops, New York or elsewhere.

Cold call the NYPD. You never know. I'm small town though, so I get that I had an easier in.

cmhbob
07-20-2014, 09:04 PM
http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/press_relations/operations.shtml