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Marian Perera
06-29-2014, 06:14 PM
Hi guys,

I've never written a historical before, so I really need some help here.

I want the story set in England, in the past, because it's a riff on A Christmas Carol. However, it has to be set during a time when the MC's comfortable middle-class house would not have a telephone, but when it might be plausible for a robber to use a pistol in a home invasion. I also want the MC to be a banker. Would somewhere around the early 1800s sound reasonable to accommodate all these?

Also, could anyone suggest where the MC could live? The whole story takes place in his house (again, Christmas Carol), but at the same time, I'd like to have an idea of the house's location. It can't be in the center of London's financial district, partly because I imagine that would be prohibitively expensive and partly because it would be too easy for him to escape from what's happening in the house by just walking across the street.

I want him to be a bit isolated, and I've written an unusually heavy snowfall into the story for that reason, but at the same time I'd like it if the house itself was in the suburbs somewhere. Not expressing myself very well here, and I plan on doing more research, but I was just wondering if anyone had any suggestions on this. Thanks in advance!

ETA : I should mention, by the way, that I'm going to pitch this story/novella as a paranormal romance that happens to be set in the 1800s. So the history doesn't have to be rigidly accurate or to the level of a real historical, but at the same time I don't want to get anything obviously wrong either.

SJAB
06-29-2014, 06:57 PM
Telephones in the UK. Just a few comments that might help. Normal working class folk, well, I can remember the phone being put into my parents' house in the mid 1960's and it was a very big deal. We were the first on our street, and it was my father's employer that had the telephone put in as he was on call.

Shops, doctors, schools, pubs, businesses and upper and maybe lower middle class had telephones, the rest of us normal folk made do with pay phones. Every small village had one.

I would say if you set your story before 1879, which is when telephones first began to appear, even as late as 1900 for the rich in rural areas. Maybe even prior to the 1914-18 war. I seem to remember from something I read that a telephone subscription cost about 20 round about then and the average earnings were 75 per year! That's average. Working class was a whole lot less. My wage when I started work in 1971 was 260 per year!(now I feel old lol)

Suburbs round London only began to spread with the advent of the railways.

1800 puts you in the Georgian era inching towards Regency.

Hope that helps.

Marian Perera
06-29-2014, 07:07 PM
I would say if you set your story before 1879, which is when telephones first began to appear, even as late as 1900 for the rich in rural areas. Maybe even prior to the 1914-18 war. I seem to remember from something I read that a telephone subscription cost about 20 round about then and the average earnings were 75 per year!

Hmm. My MC would definitely want a telephone if he was able to get one, so it has to be set before 1879, then. I think I'd rather be closer to that date than to the Regency period, anyway.

It's not a make-or-break detail. Most of all, the story needs the MC to be isolated, unable to contact anyone else or get help easily, but I want the charm of the past as well - you know, like oranges in a stocking. Thanks for your help!

King Neptune
06-29-2014, 07:34 PM
If you want the MC to have a revolver, then it would be after 1840, or so. So your best time slot would be from 1850 to 1880. Railroads came in the 1840's also, and a banker would have gotten a country house, if he could.

Marian Perera
06-29-2014, 07:41 PM
If you want the MC to have a revolver, then it would be after 1840, or so. So your best time slot would be from 1850 to 1880. Railroads came in the 1840's also, and a banker would have gotten a country house, if he could.

1870 it is. Thanks!

So it would be realistic for my MC to have a country house and commute to work via the railroad? Because the country house would be ideal for both the setting and the plot.

The person with the revolver is actually the antagonist, who breaks in as part of a robbery/home invasion.

wendymarlowe
06-30-2014, 07:19 AM
Hi guys,
ETA : I should mention, by the way, that I'm going to pitch this story/novella as a paranormal romance that happens to be set in the 1800s. So the history doesn't have to be rigidly accurate or to the level of a real historical, but at the same time I don't want to get anything obviously wrong either.

I may be reading more into this than you intended, but please don't make the mistake of assuming that just because something is sold as "romance" that it's not held to the same accuracy standards as any other genre. Unless you're self-publishing, you're going to have to impress an editor with this book - and any editor worth their salt can tell whether you've decided to half-@$$ your research or not. Pick a year (or a decade or an alternate universe), read up on it a bit, write your story, and run it by a beta reader who also has a working knowledge of that historical period. It makes a huge difference.

Helix
06-30-2014, 07:36 AM
Dunno if this'll be of any help, QoS, but under 'built environment' (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/static/London-life19th.jsp) it mentions who tended to live where and how they commuted.


Different groups gathered in different areas. During the 1860s St John’s Wood was regarded as a centre for authors, journalists and publishers. Stockbrokers and merchants settled in Bayswater, Clapham, and Haverstock Hill, while clerks were to be found in Brixton, Dalston, New Cross, Tottenham and Walthamstow. The wealthiest of all sorts were to be found in detached villas in the leafy suburbs of Balham, Barnes, Hampstead, Highgate, Richmond and Sydenham. The growth of urban transport, though not without its problems, facilitated the move to the suburbs, making the daily trip to work in the centre easier as the century progressed. Indeed, from the second half of the century the growth of the metropolitan population was almost entirely confined to the outer suburbs.

Just to mention that the term used would have probably been 'railways' rather than 'railroads'.

Marian Perera
06-30-2014, 03:43 PM
I may be reading more into this than you intended, but please don't make the mistake of assuming that just because something is sold as "romance" that it's not held to the same accuracy standards as any other genre.

No, you're quite right. I should have expressed myself better. I just thought that in a paranormal romance, there would be less focus on the history than in an actual historical or a historical romance. IMO, there's simply less room for it in my (so far) short story which takes place over 2 -3 days in the same house.

Which does not, of course, mean that historical details can simply be gotten wrong with no consequence.


Unless you're self-publishing, you're going to have to impress an editor with this book - and any editor worth their salt can tell whether you've decided to half-@$$ your research or not. Pick a year (or a decade or an alternate universe), read up on it a bit, write your story, and run it by a beta reader who also has a working knowledge of that historical period. It makes a huge difference.

Unfortunately I don't know any beta readers who are familiar with that period. I wish I did, because I have a ton more questions! But I did get a copy of What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew and am reading that.

Marian Perera
06-30-2014, 03:44 PM
Dunno if this'll be of any help, QoS, but under 'built environment' (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/static/London-life19th.jsp) it mentions who tended to live where and how they commuted.

Thanks, Helix, that did help. :)

waylander
06-30-2014, 06:27 PM
By 1870 there was an extensive network of lines and stations in Surrey and Sussex. if your MC is seriously wealthy then he could have a fine gentleman's residence a carriage ride away from one of the rural stations which he returned to for weekends and holidays while he stayed up in town (at his club?) during the week.

Sunflowerrei
07-01-2014, 11:17 AM
Unfortunately I don't know any beta readers who are familiar with that period. I wish I did, because I have a ton more questions! But I did get a copy of What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew and am reading that.

That's a fun book, but make sure that what you need is specifically Victorian. I noticed that it tended to generalize everything into "nineteenth century England," although Regency is quite different from Victorian.

But yes, a banker could have believably had a country home in the 1870s. The Rothschilds were bankers in that period and they owned land in the country.

mirandashell
07-01-2014, 07:34 PM
People who could afford a house in the country got one because London stunk. And I mean really stunk. Especially early in the period.

In fact, every city stunk because of industry and bad sewerage, mainly.

Marian Perera
07-01-2014, 07:49 PM
By 1870 there was an extensive network of lines and stations in Surrey and Sussex. if your MC is seriously wealthy then he could have a fine gentleman's residence a carriage ride away from one of the rural stations which he returned to for weekends and holidays while he stayed up in town (at his club?) during the week.

Thanks for the info! It won't be a very fine residence, but I'll set the story in Surrey.

The carriage ride part is worrying me, though. The story depends on there being a freak snowfall which strands the hero and heroine in his house. If he lives in the countryside, would it be implausible for him not to have a carriage of his own? I just wanted as few servants as possible around during the three days in which the story is set, because there's also a robbery and I didn't want to have to account for the servants (or have them be harmed, for that matter).

Marian Perera
07-01-2014, 07:52 PM
That's a fun book, but make sure that what you need is specifically Victorian. I noticed that it tended to generalize everything into "nineteenth century England," although Regency is quite different from Victorian.

I'll keep that in mind. The book is fun, as you said, but I might check the library for something else more specific to the 1870-1880 period, and preferably with more pictures too.

Sunflowerrei
07-01-2014, 08:37 PM
Thanks for the info! It won't be a very fine residence, but I'll set the story in Surrey.

The carriage ride part is worrying me, though. The story depends on there being a freak snowfall which strands the hero and heroine in his house. If he lives in the countryside, would it be implausible for him not to have a carriage of his own? I just wanted as few servants as possible around during the three days in which the story is set, because there's also a robbery and I didn't want to have to account for the servants (or have them be harmed, for that matter).

Maybe it's a holiday and he gave the servants some leave?

He probably would have a carriage in the country. Carriages were status symbols in those days, just like country houses. However, if the snowfall is really that bad, I doubt that the horses could get through the snow drifts.

Also, according to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blizzard_of_January_1881), there was a huge blizzard on January 17th & 19th in the southern part of England in 1881.

Marian Perera
07-01-2014, 09:10 PM
Maybe it's a holiday and he gave the servants some leave?

Oh yes. The whole story takes place over three days (Dec. 23, 24, 25) and he gave the servants time off for the holidays. The problem is that if there's a carriage, there need to be horses. So there would need to be a coachman or groom to take care of them. The MC is the kind of person who genuinely doesn't care if he has a slice of cold pie twice a day, but the horses can't be neglected (unless the coachman gets a holiday too and I have the MC going out to the stable to feed them, I guess).


Also, according to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blizzard_of_January_1881), there was a huge blizzard on January 17th & 19th in the southern part of England in 1881.I like that detail. At least freak snowfalls aren't completely unheard of over there. :)

ETA : Though maybe if the coachman slept in the carriage house, that would put him safely out of the way once the action starts, while simultaneously making sure the horses were all right...

mirandashell
07-01-2014, 09:18 PM
Wasn't there a mini ice age in that period? It's why we have a Dickensian idea of Christmas with snow and what not.

ETA: I just found this:
http://www.victorianlondon.org/weather/coldweather.htm

It's contemporary accounts of winter weather in Victorian London and the South East.

Oh, don't forget the fog. It caused more problems than anything else and could be a killer.

mirandashell
07-01-2014, 09:28 PM
I also found this which also has contemporary accounts:

http://vichist.blogspot.co.uk/2006/11/london-fog.html

I wish I could get a job doing research......

waylander
07-02-2014, 12:38 PM
Servants ill or recently fired?
Difficult to see how a wealthy man of that period would not have some in a country house.

Marian Perera
07-02-2014, 04:28 PM
Servants ill or recently fired?
Difficult to see how a wealthy man of that period would not have some in a country house.

The story is a riff on A Christmas Carol, so I wrote him to be the kind of person who doesn't celebrate Christmas. On the other hand, his servants do, so he gives them all a few days off, figuring he can do the accounts, catch up with correspondence and more or less take care of himself until they're back.

Maybe I could have his house be within walking distance of the railway station, meaning there's no need to have a carriage, except the heavy snowfall means no one's walking anywhere.

waylander
07-02-2014, 09:57 PM
The story is a riff on A Christmas Carol, so I wrote him to be the kind of person who doesn't celebrate Christmas. On the other hand, his servants do, so he gives them all a few days off, figuring he can do the accounts, catch up with correspondence and more or less take care of himself until they're back.


I guess that works, particularly if he wants to avoid all the jollity of Christmas. There could be a religious angle to this, he might want to spend the period in prayer and meditation

Mr Flibble
07-02-2014, 11:13 PM
If it's a riff on a Christmas Carol, he could very grudgingly give them unpaid time off (and then they can't get back because of snowstorm and he'll dock it out of their wages...until he sees the light)

Making the house in the country does complicate matters though (with the need for horses/grooms/maids etc). Can he not have a small cottage somewhere for solitude where he eschews the expense of servants? (Scrooge wouldn't hire anyone he didn't need to and would penny pinch to the extreme) I can't see a Scrooge having a flash house in the country and hiring lots of servants. That would be unnecessary expense. I can see him in a little cottage on his own and lonely, doing for himself.

Marian Perera
07-02-2014, 11:33 PM
If it's a riff on a Christmas Carol, he could very grudgingly give them unpaid time off (and then they can't get back because of snowstorm and he'll dock it out of their wages...until he sees the light)

Well, it's a romantic riff on A Christmas Carol, so he's the hero. :) As a result, he's not a mean-spirited bully to his servants (they get time off with pay), but at the same time, he's an introvert whose worst fear is of poverty, because he was almost bankrupt once. So he works over Christmas, refuses to spend money on frivolity, etc.


Making the house in the country does complicate matters though (with the need for horses/grooms/maids etc). Can he not have a small cottage somewhere for solitude where he eschews the expense of servants? (Scrooge wouldn't hire anyone he didn't need to and would penny pinch to the extreme) I can't see a Scrooge having a flash house in the country and hiring lots of servants. That would be unnecessary expense. I can see him in a little cottage on his own and lonely, doing for himself.I was trying to strike a balance between the house being the kind which would require servants every day for maintenance and the house being so miserable that the heroine would be completely turned off. She arrives unable to do things like cooking, so if he's living on dry bread and gruel, it's not going to be easy to spin a romance out of this.

So I was going for a more lower-middle-class feel. Small parlor, dining-room, two bedrooms upstairs (because I need to put the heroine somewhere other than his bedroom at first), everything either utilitarian or shabby, all the nice stuff like silver plate or even china figurines long since sold off. Not totally unpleasant, but not many creature comforts either. Basically, the kind of place where he could manage for a few days without servants because he expects it to be a very low-maintenance holiday. But other than those few days, he does need some help in the house.

If it's possible to have his house within walking distance of the nearest station, though, I could dispense with horses. That just leaves a cook and maid, maybe a housekeeper as well, but they can all take off for a few days.

Mr Flibble
07-03-2014, 12:19 AM
"Lower middle class" would probably not have 3 servants -- you could get away with a maid who comes in to "do" during the day.

Lower middle class could mean say a lowly clerk -- like Bob whatsit (ETA Cratchit! that was it) in the original. It merely meant he worked with his head, not his hands. He could easily earn less than say a skilled engineer (working class) and could in fact be pretty damn poor

Class isn't about the amount of money you have but how you come by it. Plenty of the upper classes had to learn how to cook when the money went. But even on heir uppers, they are still upper class.

So you can easily have one servant who is not live in. Or no servants. And that needn't make it shabby, or mean he lives on bread or gruel. Hell there were plenty of people with money who were eccentric enough to live without servants :) You can pretty much have it as you want provided you account for him not wanting servants around in the story.

mirandashell
07-03-2014, 12:26 AM
Lower middle might have a 'maid of all work' but it would be unusual for a man on his own. So yeah, an older woman who 'does' for him would be more likely

Marian Perera
07-03-2014, 12:30 AM
"Lower middle class" would probably not have 3 servants -- you could get away with a maid who comes in to "do" during the day.

Lower middle class could mean say a lowly clerk -- like Bob whatsit in the original. It merely meant he worked with his head, not his hands. He could easily earn less than say a skilled engineer (working class)

Class isn't about the amount of money you have but how you come by it. Plenty of the upper classes had to learn how to cook when the money went. But even on heir uppers, they are still upper class.

My bad. Thanks for clarifying. I'll be careful about that expression.


So you can easily have one servant who is not live in. Or no servants. And that needn't make it shabby, or mean he lives on bread or gruel.But without servants, he'd have to do his own cooking, wouldn't he? I thought it might be difficult to reconcile the profession of banker with someone who cooked and cleaned and made do for himself all the time - I figured three days was pushing it, especially back in 1880.

And he has to be a banker, because, well, the Scrooge parallel. Plus, I wanted him to be the kind of person who does have money (now). He's just reluctant to spend it.

The other thing about a live-in servant was, the heroine arrives with no clothes of her own. So she has to wear one of the maid's dresses (which she has access to because this is a live-in maid who's been given time off). I could have her wearing the hero's clothes, but that's going to get into a weird area when she meets people at the end.


Hell there were plenty of people with money who were eccentric enough to live without servants :) You can pretty much have it as you want provided you account for him not wanting servants around in the story. Well, one reason he doesn't want the servants around is because he knows they like to celebrate Christmas, whereas he treats it like any other day of the year. If he keeps them there, it'll be drab and bleak for them at best. At worst, they'll sing carols in the kitchen or enjoy themselves in a way that reminds him he doesn't even have any friends to be frivolous with. He's much happier by himself, as long as they've left a little cold food for him to eat while he goes through ledgers.

I'd rather he have servants for the rest of the year, though. :)

Marian Perera
07-03-2014, 12:43 AM
Lower middle might have a 'maid of all work' but it would be unusual for a man on his own. So yeah, an older woman who 'does' for him would be more likely

I think I got the classes muddled up. I hope he can still have a maid and a cook, at least - because they both appear in the epilogue.

ULTRAGOTHA
07-03-2014, 03:12 AM
That's a fun book, but make sure that what you need is specifically Victorian. I noticed that it tended to generalize everything into "nineteenth century England," although Regency is quite different from Victorian.

This is sooo true. You'll have an easier time that I do in research because a lot of "19th" century assumes "Victorian" ignoring the first 40 years of the century. But be very wary of comparisons between Austen and Dickens. Their worlds and technology were very different.



ETA : Though maybe if the coachman slept in the carriage house, that would put him safely out of the way once the action starts, while simultaneously making sure the horses were all right...

It's completely believable that the coachman and grooms live out of the house. In fact, It'd make me raise my eyebrows if they lived in the house.

snafu1056
07-03-2014, 03:43 AM
Theres another great book called The Good Old Days...They were Terrible! by Otto Bettmann. It discusses all the uglier, unromantic aspects of Victorian life. It pertains more to America than England, but many of these issues were shared by both countries. Anyone writing anything set in Victorian times should read it.

Marian Perera
07-03-2014, 04:56 AM
This is sooo true. You'll have an easier time that I do in research because a lot of "19th" century assumes "Victorian" ignoring the first 40 years of the century. But be very wary of comparisons between Austen and Dickens. Their worlds and technology were very different.

Thanks for the warning! I'll keep that in mind. :)


It's completely believable that the coachman and grooms live out of the house. In fact, It'd make me raise my eyebrows if they lived in the house.

I think the coachman remaining behind could work, then. He'll be out of the way while the hero and heroine meet and during the robbery, because all that will take place in the house, but he can hurry there afterwards to help.

mirandashell
07-03-2014, 04:36 PM
I think I got the classes muddled up. I hope he can still have a maid and a cook, at least - because they both appear in the epilogue.

Then upper middle with family money would be better. He could be the fourth son or something so unlikely to inherit the pile but would have money behind him.

King Neptune
07-03-2014, 05:11 PM
I think the coachman remaining behind could work, then. He'll be out of the way while the hero and heroine meet and during the robbery, because all that will take place in the house, but he can hurry there afterwards to help.

It was (and still is) common for the people who cared for the horses to live in quarters attached to or above the stable. So the coachman would seldom be in the main house.

Marian Perera
07-03-2014, 05:17 PM
Then upper middle with family money would be better. He could be the fourth son or something so unlikely to inherit the pile but would have money behind him.

Hmm. His backstory is that he once made a bad business decision that lost most of what his father had left to him. To claw his way out of potential bankruptcy, he worked 24/7 - and continues to do so even though he's in a more comfortable position now. I also didn't write him with brothers, because I wanted him to inherit something and then make a hash of it because he was only twenty at the time.

mirandashell
07-03-2014, 05:20 PM
Ah! That backstory sounds fine. There were a lot of entrepreneurs around at the time and a lot of them did lose their money. So that makes sense.

I would make him upper middle then.

waylander
07-03-2014, 05:24 PM
Hmm. His backstory is that he once made a bad business decision that lost most of what his father had left to him. To claw his way out of potential bankruptcy, he worked 24/7 - and continues to do so even though he's in a more comfortable position now. I also didn't write him with brothers, because I wanted him to inherit something and then make a hash of it because he was only twenty at the time.

Very easy around that time to invest in, say, the wrong railway company.

mirandashell
07-03-2014, 05:26 PM
Or a company making steam something-or-others that blow up their factory. Or gas. Gas was good at blowing stuff up, especially in the early days when people weren't sure how to handle it.

Marian Perera
07-03-2014, 05:42 PM
Very easy around that time to invest in, say, the wrong railway company.

Oh, I like that - it would be one more way of getting a sense of time and place into the story.

Tell me if you guys find this realistic. He and a partner invested together in a railway company (I'll come up with a name later), and the partner ran off with most of the funds. Because he didn't want employees and other investors to completely lose out thanks to the partner he'd made the mistake of trusting, he took loans and worked like hell until the company was restored to some semblance of viability. But along the way, he not only lost the capacity to enjoy life, he never wanted to be an entrepreneur again. So he sold what he owned to some bigger railway company and settled into a joyless but predictable routine (which is where the story begins).

mirandashell
07-03-2014, 06:07 PM
That sounds fine. There was a lot of small companies in the very beginning who got snapped quite quickly by the more successful if the small company had a profitable route.

And where you get entrepreneurs you get fraudsters. So yeah, sounds believable to me. And also makes your hero one of the good guys.

maryland
07-03-2014, 08:14 PM
You could have a horse-drawn carriage waiting at the station, an early taxi-service. Then you don't have to worry about being responsible about horses/coachman etc. A 'lad from the village' could be looking after his own horses, as he's given his resident groom a few days off?

Sunflowerrei
07-05-2014, 11:12 AM
You know, what you're describing reminds me of Cranford. There was a plot in there about the railroad coming to town, but also a single doctor moved to town and he only had a woman living with him to do his cooking and cleaning and washing.

I think the servants being let go for a little Christmas holiday sounds plausible and he could very well just have a Cook, a maid, and a coachman who sleeps above the horses in the stables. So, maybe, he doesn't have a huge country house, but a country cottage. That is, more Longbourn and not Pemberley.

Although, they called places like this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate_box_art#mediaviewer/File:Wrayland_Manor_-_geograph.org.uk_-_437386.jpg) cottages, too.

KarmaPolice
07-05-2014, 02:43 PM
A few thoughts about servants.

This was a very labour-intensive age, and labour was pretty cheap (compared to today). Just for example - 'The morning cup of tea'...

Rake out range of last-night's clinkers. Fuel up with coal and kindling. Wait for it to build up heat. Boil water in kettle. Transfer boiling water to teapot. Leave to stand. Pour out. Carry on tray to either dining-room or master's bedroom. A good half-hour gone.

Heating comes from coal fires - one in each important room. Houses are drafty and damp. Rugs a large, heavy and can only be dusted by dragging them outside and being beaten with those paddle things. All hot water comes from either kettles on the range or a back-boiler by the kitchen range. Everything is delivered to the door - meat, fish, coal, veg etc and requires a person to be in all day, every day. No fridges, all cookery is from scratch. To send an urgent message requires a person to take the telegram paper to the nearest post office. This all adds up in man-hours.

I'd guess a minimum staff for a 'single gentleman' to be of a manservant (run messages, organise the master's luggage, clothes, life etc) a housekeeper (run house, wait for deliveries, cook breakfast) and one 'daily maid' (cleaning, drudge-work).

A cook wouldn't be necessary - in a city the man would usually dine at restaurants/a club/friends and the housekeeper would be able to churn out stews/meat-and-two-veg/fried breakfasts to an acceptable standard when he wasn't. In a city he wouldn't have a horse, so no groom - though a good manservant should know the basics on serving one. A jobbing gardener would come weekly (if he had one), as well as other labour 'when needed'. The manservant would probably like a 'scullery boy' to send on the piddily errands all day, but not vital.

In the country, the easiest way to deal with servants is to have the housekeeper's husband to act as groom/gardener. He might have one horse if he's properly 'in the sticks' or wants to go hunting - but could hire one by the day otherwise if needed. If he still has a farm or three tied to the house, he might have a part-time land agent to manage the tenants (though could to that himself).

RN Hill
07-05-2014, 10:42 PM
I'd suggest you get a copy of Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything -- he has a lot of good stuff on this time period, including what servants did, how they worked, etc.

I would think that if your character is somewhat miserly, he wouldn't spend money on horses, not c. 1870 when in London he could get a hansom cab at almost any time, and the railways were connecting nearly every town in England. Then as now, horses were VERY expensive.

Maybe the servant(s) haven't arrived because he came down a night early to get out of the city and the snowstorm hits after he arrives, meaning they can't get there? Maybe the house is shut up most of the time? If he's used to doing for himself, he wouldn't need many servants -- as others have said, a maid to "do" for him and perhaps a manservant when he's in London.

Graylorne
07-06-2014, 07:11 PM
If I remember rightly, when your mc isn't of the super wealthy, he probably won't keep horses and carriage at his town house, there simply wasn't room for it in London. Mostly those were kept in the country.
In Town, he could use the livery stables.

Ah, the poster above me said the about same. Sorry, RN, I was too hasty.