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Tazlima
06-21-2014, 07:58 AM
There's a move that you see a lot in old school cartoons, for example, it happens in the introduction to the Flintstones when Fred jumps in the car and starts "driving." For a few moments before he actually begins to move forward, he runs frantically in place, his feet moving so quickly that their motion is blurred. The same visual gag occurs in countless other old cartoons.

Does this move have a name?

Telergic
06-21-2014, 08:33 AM
I'm pretty sure it does have a name, but I can't find an old book on cartoon tech and lore I have around here someplace so....

Actually, I think there's two terms, the first being the words actual cartoonists would use to describe it, the other being some kind of learned academic term for the appearance of persistence of the cause of the motion prior to the actual effect of it.

Sorry, but I think your search will eventually pay off, anyway.

AuthorUnknown
06-21-2014, 08:46 AM
I can't think of it, but if you watch a show with it happening with the closed captioning on, it might say what it is, if that makes sense. That might not make sense.

Zashi
06-21-2014, 11:00 AM
I have heard it referred to as "wheel o' feet" and such blurring in the animation industry is sometimes called a "smear". In the old days it often wasn't an actual blur but rather done with drybrush to get the transparent effect. The act of him running on the spot before leaping into the car is more generally described as an anticipation or "antic", which is a broad animation principle. I am studying animation/am an animator so feel free to ask me any other questions about the topic :)

Ken
06-21-2014, 04:20 PM
roadrunner does an abridged version, I believe, before taking off
"beep beep"

WeaselFire
06-21-2014, 11:54 PM
The act of him running on the spot before leaping into the car is more generally described as an anticipation or "antic", which is a broad animation principle.
That's the term I've known too, but it's not really specific to just the feet running in place.

Jeff

Zashi
06-22-2014, 07:17 AM
Hence why I said it was a "broad animation principle".

Tazlima
06-22-2014, 07:32 AM
I think "wheel o' feet" is perfect for my particular situation, as it is more specific to this particular move, and doesn't require familiarity with animation terminology to evoke a mental image.

Thanks to everybody for their help! AW is the greatest!

MttStrn
06-22-2014, 08:55 AM
Depending, of course, on what kind of voice you are writing in, I would just use "Fred-Flintstoned his feet."