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Mark Moore
06-20-2014, 05:20 AM
This is something that might apply to a few of my female MCs. They're not the type that would ever want to have children, so they'd be like "Why do I have to deal with this? I'm gonna do something about it!"

But what can they do? Is there some kind of procedure (whether medical or DIY) for a young woman to induce menopause?

And what would be the consequences of that?

Helix
06-20-2014, 05:25 AM
What's wrong with standard contraception?

Ari Meermans
06-20-2014, 05:31 AM
^ My question, too.

Menopause can be induced by certain medications, chemotherapy, pelvic radiation, or surgically. I can think of no doctor who'd do this to a healthy young woman without a strong medical reason, nor can I think of a sensible young woman wanting it. The body would no longer produce estrogen or progesterone, and this can have negative effects to the skin and hair (such as drying and thinning), as well as to bone health. You might want to think of something less dramatic.

Cath
06-20-2014, 05:39 AM
As far as I know, a hysterectomy is the main way to induce early menopause without other health factors present, but there are significant health risks.

Here are a couple of good links on this from reputable sources:

http://www.medicinenet.com/premature_menopause_medical_procedural_causes/article.htm

http://www.webmd.com/menopause/guide/premature-menopause

SWest
06-20-2014, 06:03 AM
...They're not the type that would ever want to have children, so they'd be like "Why do I have to deal with this? I'm gonna do something about it!"

...

Vasectomy. :D


...

And what would be the consequences of that?

:banana:

Mark Moore
06-20-2014, 06:06 AM
Menopause can be induced by certain medications, chemotherapy, pelvic radiation, or surgically. I can think of no doctor who'd do this to a healthy young woman without a strong medical reason, nor can I think of a sensible young woman wanting it. The body would no longer produce estrogen or progesterone, and this can have negative effects to the skin and hair (such as drying and thinning), as well as to bone health. You might want to think of something less dramatic.

Well, anything that would get rid of a monthly period.

debirlfan
06-20-2014, 06:16 AM
A more likely answer would be going on the pill "non-stop" without the usual monthly break. http://www.webmd.com/sex/birth-control/features/no-more-periods

Cath
06-20-2014, 06:24 AM
Mark, why don't you Google "contraception to prevent periods" and see what you can find. There really is an awful lot of good information about this at the other end of a basic Google search.

lianna williamson
06-20-2014, 06:38 AM
Yeah, menopause isn't as simple as "Woo-hoo! Sex with no contraception, and no periods! Awesome!" It's a major bodily change with all kinds of side effects most women young enough to bear children wouldn't be lining up to embrace. It's kind of like suggesting castration as a handy birth control method for men.

Check out uterine ablation-- basically, the inside of the uterus is seared so that no lining can build up, meaning no periods (and no children). The hormones still function normally.

wendymarlowe
06-20-2014, 07:13 PM
Several forms of hormonal contraception can cause there to be fewer or no periods. If she's sexually active, though, she may still want to have a (lighter, shorter) period - it does wonders for the neurotic fear of "What I'm pregnant even though I'm on birth control?"

Perks
06-20-2014, 07:24 PM
Menopause has more far-reaching ramifications than sterility and the cessation of monthly periods. A young woman would not want to induce menopause for all sorts of significant health reasons.

If a young woman really didn't want to have a monthly period anymore, permanently, she might be able to convince her doctor to perform a uterine ablation, a procedure that involves scalding the lining of the uterus. The regular hormonal cycles would still exist, but the effects - PMS and monthly bleeding - would be greatly reduced, if not eradicated.

The trouble is, it's irreversible and also dangerous to become pregnant after an ablation. (Fertility is vastly decreased, but there's still the chance.) If you combined an ablation with tubal ligation, you'd effectively sterilize her, but it's going to be a bit of a trick to make this convincing, as most doctors would be very reluctant (if not refusing altogether) to make such a permanent solution to something that everyday birth control could do almost as well.

Look up the Depo-Provera shot. That's still available and does a pretty tidy job of reducing monthly cycles, albeit not without side effects.

mirandashell
06-20-2014, 07:30 PM
As someone who is going through menopause at the moment, trust me when I say no woman would voluntarily go through this without a damn better reason than no periods

Perks
06-20-2014, 07:38 PM
As someone who is going through menopause at the moment, trust me when I say no woman would voluntarily go through this without a damn better reason than no periods

What, you don't like random bouts of your blood turning to lava? (Among other things, of course.)

mirandashell
06-20-2014, 07:51 PM
Nope. Nor the mood swings, the insomnia, the tiredness, the dry skin and hair.....

Anninyn
06-20-2014, 08:04 PM
Yeah, menopause is a serious, long-lasting thing with health repercussions that include brittle bones and in some severe cases mental illness. I can't really see any woman deliberately putting herself through that at 20 or 30 just for no periods. Periods can be miserable, but manageable.

The most likely thing for a young woman who doesn't want kids to do, if she doesn't want to be on contraception, is to have her 'tubes tied' but it is very difficult to get a doctor to agree with you about this if you haven't already had kids.

Otherwise, she may well opt for one of the many contraception methods with near-100% reliability such as the contraceptive implant, injection or the coil. In some cases these may stop women having periods.

I'm sure your area has websites dedicated to women's health and contraception methods - why not spend some time on one of those?

Forsooth
06-20-2014, 08:17 PM
My friend got a doctor to agree to get her tubes tied, she went to two doctors. She's 24.

They are more easy on men though, if a man asks a doctor he usually gets a yes a straight away whilst we have to jump through lots of loop holes.

NinjaFingers
06-20-2014, 08:20 PM
It's a liability thing. I know somebody with severe PCOS who has begged multiple hospitals for a hysterectomy.

They refuse because "She might sue them when she realizes she's infertile."

Best part?

Her PCOS is so bad she's...already infertile.

Sigh. (This is in Ohio. I have a long list of reasons why I would never move to Ohio...)

Siri Kirpal
06-20-2014, 11:51 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Menopause can also cause painful breast, and dryness where a sexually active woman would not want to be dry.

(Don't ask how I know those things.)

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

benbradley
06-21-2014, 12:30 AM
Well, anything that would get rid of a monthly period.
Lots of aerobic exercise. I used to run and read a lot about running, and I've read how women who do a lot of running (perhaps 20 miles a week or more, plenty enough to train for a half marathon) stop having their periods. I'm not sure if it's totally reliable, and their periods come back when they reduce their mileage, but it happens and appears to have no bad consequences (at least compared to menopause). Maybe you could do more research into this.

mirandashell
06-21-2014, 12:33 AM
It depends on body fat. If you don't have any, you don't have periods. It happens to women who weight train seriously. And gymnasts.

mirandashell
06-22-2014, 11:04 PM
One other symptom no-one tells you about: itchy hair.

Not literally itchy but when your blood turns to lava, your scalp gets so hot that your hair just feels so irritating. I've come pretty close to shaving it off a couple of times.

And weight gain. That's another bitch. I've put on 3 stone in 10 months. I know these are only small things but it all adds up together.

ap123
06-23-2014, 12:27 AM
And weight gain. That's another bitch. I've put on 3 stone in 10 months. I know these are only small things but it all adds up together.

This. This. This. This. :rant:

mirandashell
06-23-2014, 01:17 AM
Tell me about it. Two new sets of clothes for starters. I also have bras in four sizes.

EarlyBird
06-23-2014, 03:07 AM
Do you want to induce infertility or menopause? Two totally different things...although the latter leads to the former. But if you want your character to not be able to have children, EVER, then becoming infertile is the solution and does not necessarily result in menopause. This can be accidental (accident, disease) or it can be intentional (tubes tied, hysterectomy).

Just sayin'.

Cath
06-23-2014, 03:10 AM
*cough* I think we're straying a little from the OP's question.

Cassiopeia
06-23-2014, 03:36 AM
Women also experience a reduction in tolerance to pain after menopause. There are medications that will stop a woman from bleeding. Also, we lose muscle tone when those hormones are eliminated and at a higher risk for heart disease.

I can't help but say this:

As a woman and having know tons and tons of other women I've yet to find one who was willing to do anything to stop their monthly cycle just to avoid pregnancy.

If your character has an abnormal psychological aversion than maybe she'd opt to risk the side effects of early menopause but it's highly rare.

Mark Moore
06-24-2014, 07:09 AM
I'm sorry, I did mean infertility, not menopause.

My characters tend to have a low tolerance for annoyances and any other distractions from their lives, and they especially dislike kids. They wouldn't dream of having their own. They also have set things that they're focused on, and they wouldn't want to let child-rearing get in their way of their own lives. They know they'd be lousy parents, so they want to make certain that they'll never have any children of their own (in a way, they're smart versions of that jerk that suffocated his child for interrupting his video game - or that jerk that broke his baby's arm for interrupting his video game; both happened in my county this year, seriously). Plus they hate periods.

Oh, and, other than generally trying to keep in decent shape, my characters aren't fitness breaks, so intense workouts aren't the way that they're gonna do it.

Some of my characters are from another world or universe, so I can have them be "We don't get those." One will turn out to be a mutant, so her period can just stop. Another will live in the year 2050, so I can sci-fi the problem away. Three others will have the problem solved through divine intervention. For the remainder, living on Earth "now" (whenever now is), I need a real-world solution.

Helix
06-24-2014, 07:35 AM
Real world solution = employing the normal methods used by millions of women who don't want to have children. Or is menstruation an integral part of the plot? Are they going to be talking about it a lot like actors in a tampon ad?

The way you've described them, you've made them sound like a bunch of psychopaths. Not wanting children is not equivalent to killing a child for interrupting a video game. I'm sure it was inadvertent, but it might be something to have a big think about.

archangel
06-24-2014, 10:21 AM
It's been awhile since I worked in women's healthcare, but she can take several types of contraceptives to suspend her period for a period of time. No pun intended. However, I also sold hormone replacement therapy. Trust me. The women who were peri-menapausal and menopausal weren't doing backflips. No fun. There are consequences, hence the hormone replacement therapy, which can have its own consequences.

Old Hack
06-24-2014, 10:40 AM
Your character could just take the contraceptive pill all the time, instead of the more usual three weeks on, one week off.

Or she could become anorexic, or very stressed. That would do it too. But I think taking the pill is a better option.

Cassiopeia
06-25-2014, 05:28 AM
There is subcutaneous birth control (http://www.cpmc.org/services/women/health/birth-control.html#Subcutaneous%20Birth%20Control%20Meth ods)that is usually inserted under the inner side of the upper arm that as far as I know completely stops periods for up to five (5) years.


Norplant is a method of birth control that uses a synthetic form of progesterone, called levonorgestrel. Implants containing the drug are inserted under the skin of a woman's arm. The implants release levonorgestrel for 5 years. Norplant causes the cervix mucus to become thick and sticky, preventing sperm from entering the uterus. It also prevents the ovaries from releasing eggs.

Mark Moore
06-26-2014, 04:50 AM
There is subcutaneous birth control (http://www.cpmc.org/services/women/health/birth-control.html#Subcutaneous%20Birth%20Control%20Meth ods)that is usually inserted under the inner side of the upper arm that as far as I know completely stops periods for up to five (5) years.

Wow, this is interesting. I think I'll go with this one. Thanks. :)

AnnaPappenheim
08-11-2014, 09:23 AM
There's a great website on natural contraception, fertility, and the like:
http://www.sisterzeus.com

I would look there. It's an incredibly comprehensive site!

For example, clover makes cattle infertile, and has been found to do so in humans too, though I don't believe this is permanent. And wild yam is a natural contraceptive. The site lists and details many, many natural herbs, roots, flowers, etc. She even shares amounts to take, and sometimes documents the stories of women who have tried these things recently.

John Riddle has a few books on ancient to premodern fertility methods, contraceptives, emmenagogues, and abortifacients. Great reads. Not sure it's *exactly* what you're looking for though...

kkwalker
08-11-2014, 04:48 PM
Friend of mine went thru a hysterectomy at 35--it doesn't remove the ovaries, so it doesn't affect her bones or hair or whatnot at all, but it did stop her painful, horribly heavy periods.

Oh.... and she DID have a horrible time convincing the doc that she didn't want any more children. Why is it that doctors can't believe that a woman wouldn't want kids (or else think that all women should have kids)? And why is there such a stigma against women who choose not to have kids? Like we're not real women?

I know... off topic... but the OP might want to think about and include the social implications for the women who choose to go thru a procedure that makes them infertile.

Mark Moore
08-14-2014, 04:21 AM
I know... off topic... but the OP might want to think about and include the social implications for the women who choose to go thru a procedure that makes them infertile.

This is an interesting point that I hadn't considered. "Vanity City" is a futuristic cyberpunk series in a ficticious nation, where not minding other people's business is normal and expected, so this wouldn't be an issue there. I could bring it up it up in my other series, though. Thanks! :)