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la-gamine
06-19-2014, 04:49 AM
So I have a character that was assumed to have drowned. I was wondering whether or not they make gravestones for people when they have no actual body to bury?

Setting is Canada around 1895.

alleycat
06-19-2014, 04:52 AM
They used to erect a marker or monument for those who died at sea (either everyone of a particular ship or from a particular village). Maybe you could use something like that.

Haggis
06-19-2014, 05:03 AM
So I have a character that was assumed to have drowned. I was wondering whether or not they make gravestones for people when they have no actual body to bury?

Setting is Canada around 1895.
What the pussycat said.

And sometimes individual families will erect monuments to family members they cannot bury for whatever reason. But in 1895? Dunno for sure, but I'm thinking not too often.

Perhaps there's a Provincial cemetery association you can query. Or even a few large cemeteries in the region where your story is set.

Marlys
06-19-2014, 05:22 AM
I've seen individual stones for people lost at sea in many graveyards--do a Google Image search and you'll find tons of them. Not Canada in particular, but I can't think of any reason why it would be an exception.

jclarkdawe
06-19-2014, 06:09 AM
Is this a seaport or fishing port? Or is he from inland?

Many churches in ports would maintain (and still maintain) a wall with markers for those lost at sea.

If he is from inland, his family could put a marker on the family's grave site. It would be up to his family.

Understand that legally there is a lot of difference between presumed drown and no body found and known to have drowned and no body found. If you're on a ship and it sinks and you aren't on the lifeboat or there is no lifeboat, you can be declared dead by a court fairly quickly. If you fall off a rock into a river and no one finds your body, you're going to have to wait a significant amount of time before you can be declared dead.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Bing Z
06-19-2014, 06:17 AM
Isidor and Ida Straus, two of the most prominent passengers on board Titanic, died together when the ship sank. Isidor's body was found but never was Ida's. According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isidor_Straus), they kept Isidor's coffin at Straus Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery, where Ida shared a cenotaph with her husband.

mrsmig
06-19-2014, 06:21 AM
There's a whole section of Arlington National Cemetery (outside Washington, DC) dedicated to gravestones for those whose bodies were not recoverable (for example, those aboard the ill-fated USS nuclear submarines Scorpion and Thresher).

With typical military pragmatism, the section is located on a steep hill, where it would be impossible to actually bury anyone.

WeaselFire
06-19-2014, 09:27 AM
I was wondering whether or not they make gravestones for people when they have no actual body to bury?
Yes, they do. Glad to have helped.

Jeff

Anninyn
06-19-2014, 12:39 PM
In any coastal town you can find monuments to those lost at sea. In a lot of those cases, no body will have been recovered. Often, these stones are paid for by the town officials after a fundraising effort, or they'll be paid for by individual family members if they can afford it.

Here are the details of a monument in Wells Next The Sea in Norfolk. 11 men died in the Eliza May lifeboat disaster. One of them was never washed ashore. http://www.wellslifeboat.org/eliza.htm

waylander
06-19-2014, 01:56 PM
As the ever-informative J. Clarke-Dawe said, the family might well add the person's details to an existing gravestone e.g. the parents' gravestone with something like 'J. Doe, beloved son of A Doe, born 18yy, lost at sea 18xx'