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Lunatique
06-17-2014, 12:09 PM
Recently, I've had a couple of conversations with others that involved giving up writing and how it could actually make someone happier overall. I thought I'd ask fellow writers here to weigh in on this topic.

In the first conversation, it was with someone who has a degree in English--a middle-age mother of two. She's someone who had been trying to write novels all her life and just very recently decided to finally give up on that aspiration, and felt much happier because of it.

She said that she had come across someone's speech/book/article (I don't remember exactly what it was), talking about how in western culture, we have this tradition of constantly telling everyone that we all should have a dream and aspiration and passion for something that's our calling, and we all should strive to make our dreams come true and spend our lives chasing after that goal. We all should aspire to attain some kind of recognition for the work we do, to prove to ourselves that we have "arrived," and if we could earn lots of money for those accomplishments, all the better.

But we aren't all meant be stars or award-winning somebodies. We aren't all supposed to make our dreams come true and fulfill our aspirations. We can't all have jobs that we love, or else no one will do the jobs that aren't glamorous/fun/lucrative/meaningful.

She struggled with her writing all her life, and it just felt more and more like a weight that she carried around--this pressure to perform and "make something of herself"--to accomplish something that fulfills her aspirations. It no longer was enjoyable and became a negative force in her life that made her unhappy. After she realized she didn't need to carry around that weight anymore, she suddenly felt the stress melt away and she became a lot happier overall.

In the second conversation, it was with my wife just today. She came into my studio and wanted to let me know that if one day I decide to give up on trying to write novels, she wouldn't think any less of me, or feel any differently about me. All she wants is for me to be happy and content, and the rest just doesn't matter. She also said, "No one else really cares what you do with your life either--not your family or friends. If they care about you, they just want you to be happy, no matter what you choose to with your life."

She wanted me to understand that she wasn't trying to talk me out of trying to fulfill my writing aspirations--she was just trying to tell me that if one day I realize I no longer want to carry that stress to perform and write something great, and instead just wants to live a life without the pressure of having to accomplish a lifelong dream, I could still live a happy life. Watch movies/TV, read books, play video games, eat good food, visit interesting places, hanging out with friends--there's nothing wrong with living a life like that.

In both conversations, the overall message is the same: Having a dream/aspiration that has a low success rate and requires you to constantly strive for excellence, can be a source of stress that make you unhappy, and if you let go of that, you can live a normal life without that added pressure.

Now, we all know that different writers write for different sets of reasons. Some are just in love with telling stories. Some want fame and money. Some want to prove to the world of their worth and establish a legacy. Some use writing to exercise inner demons. Some see it as a worthy challenge. Some need to have a sense of purpose in life.

For me, I think it's a mixture of all those reasons (except for the inner demon part--that was in my twenties).

I explained to her that in all the jobs I've had in the past, regardless if they were creative jobs or "normal" jobs, in every single one of them, when I was working, there was always a thought nagging in the back of my mind that I would rather be working on my own stories, and all the time and energy I used to work on other people's ideas should be spent on my own ideas instead. For me, writing is the thing I'd rather be working on if I had to be working.

So what if I won the lottery? Would I still write? Is that sense of purpose and love for storytelling so strong that even great wealth can't change that need to write? I asked her, "Why do rich and famous authors still write? It's not as if they need the money or fame--they already have it. So of course there's something else driving that desire."

If I spent all of my time just watching movies/TV, playing video games, hanging out, eating out, go on vacations, etc, I would probably feel so lost, because there's no more sense of purpose left. I'd just consume and be entertained, and if that's all there is, I'd feel quite empty inside.

Sure, I have other creative passions like composing music, drawing/painting, photography, and filmmaking, but in all of them, the main ingredient that drives my creative sparks is storytelling. My music all convey emotions and tell stories. My artworks do the same--they often feature characters from my stories. Filmmaking is of course, arguably the most important form of storytelling in today's culture. Photography is about the only one where storytelling isn't as important to me (though plenty of photographers emphasize storytelling).

Actually, it was because after all these years, I realized that everything creative I do have their motivations rooted in storytelling, that I decided to just focus on writing novels, as that's the purest form of storytelling to me.

Yes, writing can be stressful, frustrating, and depressing, but it also gives me a sense of purpose in life. Storytelling has always been a huge part of my life, and it just comes so naturally to me that I can't even stop the ideas from flowing freely all the time. I would feel like an aimless driftwood if I were to give it up.

How about you guys? What would life be like if you gave up writing? Would you feel less stress and disappointment and be happier? Would you still write if you won the lottery? If you became a rich and famous author, would you continue to write? If you won prestigious awards as an author, would you continue to write? What does writing really mean to you?

Anninyn
06-17-2014, 01:24 PM
I would be a lot unhappier. I'm one of those people who always has to urge to tell stories. I don't actually care about 'success', as we define it, though obviously it would be nice. I write because I enjoy it. No matter what job I do, I write when I get home, because I like it.

I do think that our focus on 'succeeding with your dream!' is damaging though. Not all of us CAN succeed with our dream. Some of us have unrealistic dreams, some of use just won't be lucky enough. This idea that we all have to be aspiring towards something 'greater' or we aren't living a true, authentic life is probably responsible for a lot of stress and mental problems among young people. It's a lot of pressure, and most people can't meet it.

There is nothing wrong with getting a good, 'normal' job and having a few hobbies, and being happy with that. It's what my husband has done, and he's satisfied. He is more than smart and creative enough to follow any dream and aspiration he wants - he could turn his chainmail making into an actual business, rather than a hobby that gets him extra money - but he doesn't want to. He wants to do a job he's good at, collect his wages, come home and spend time with me.

Ken
06-17-2014, 02:32 PM
I would be doing something different like mathematics. I always liked the subject and would totally be into it.

Andieee
06-17-2014, 03:34 PM
I would probably get back to webdesign. Though it wouldn't be as fun as writing. Not to mention that my head would probably explode from all the untold ideas (I just have to share them all the time).

J.S.F.
06-17-2014, 03:43 PM
If I gave up writing, think of how much more time I'd have to frequent this forum and write drivel!:D

Seriously, I enjoy telling a good story. Always have and always will. I'm well aware of the low success rate in writing, especially fiction writing, and over the past couple of years, have read about how some writers have been used and abused and abandoned.

When I started out, I was painfully aware of my deficiencies. I had poor style, overused words, had run-on sentences...you name it. And I was called on it, deservedly so. Some critics asked me "What are you writing for? You aren't that good."

Yet, I have not quit. I don't like to leave a job unfinished--any job--and writing, while not a job per se (it's more like a hobby) is something I'd like to finish up. Thing is, you can never be finished and I'll never be satisfied. Even if the impossible happens and I make the bestseller's list with all the trappings fame has to offer, I'll still write and try to improve.

robjvargas
06-17-2014, 04:33 PM
Can't do it. I'm not happier with it or without it. It's part and parcel of my functioning. I'm always inventing plots, settings, characters. I occupy myself with conversations with characters when I'm alone. I'm not so dependent on getting it written down, but neither do I see tapping away on keys (or writing in a pad) as a difference between happiness and misery.

Wilde_at_heart
06-17-2014, 04:43 PM
If I gave up writing, think of how much more time I'd have to frequent this forum and write drivel!:D


:ROFL:

That sounds like something I would say ...

Seriously though, I think if someone is writing to find success in something and meaning, then they're probably writing for the wrong reasons.

I tried not writing off and on for several years and found smoking easier to give up. And believe me, that took a while.

chompers
06-17-2014, 04:48 PM
I'd be fine with it. Writing is not something that comes easily to me. I have to really work hard (harder than most) to tell stories. I really don't know why I was compelled to write in the first place, I never had aspirations to write before, it just happened one day. I think my friends would be surprised to know that I write (I don't tell them).

Writing is an aside thing for me. My real passion happens to be with what my day job is. If I won the lottery, I'd still be doing that, but not writing. That's not to say I don't enjoy writing (okay, maybe I don't enjoy the process, but it's worth it once I have that final product in my hands), but I wouldn't feel like my arm got cut off or something.

Yes, people should continually strive to achieve their dreams. But it should be something they're passionate about. Don't waste time chasing after something that doesn't bring you enjoyment.

LJD
06-17-2014, 04:59 PM
I could see giving up writing for several months, and I could see how that might be good for me at certain times in my life. But I think I'd always come back to it.

I recently took a few weeks off after a really frustrating edit, and I got lots of stuff done because I wasn't sinking all my time into writing. It was rather relaxing, too.

Maggie Maxwell
06-17-2014, 06:16 PM
I did give it up. For six years during and after college, I quit because "you won't make money as a writer, so study something that will become a career."

Worst six years of my life. I wasn't ME for six years, because my head was too empty.

mada
06-17-2014, 06:19 PM
I'd be lost. I don't write to become famous or rich, I do it because I need to. It's easy to tell when I skip a day or two because I get uber-crabby.

RightHoJeeves
06-18-2014, 05:30 AM
Interesting question. I agree with you about how people are supposed to have a goal, dream, passion, whatever, but one thing that seems to be missing from that idea is that you must enjoy the journey to the goal.

Case in point - I recently split up with my girlfriend who was so obsessed with the idea of having a "fulfilling career", that she was incapable of enjoying the present. She would get very anxious about where she was, because she wasn't sure if it was leading to that goal. Interestingly, she didn't even know what the fulfilling career or goal was. Go figure.

With my writing, of course I'd love to be published, sell a billion copies, etc. But I enjoy the process so much, and get so much out of it, that I think it's simplistic to measure success entirely by those parameters. I may never get there in the end, but I will have still gotten a lot of joy out it along the way.

Jehhillenberg
06-18-2014, 05:59 AM
If I gave up writing -- I'd DIE!!!

C.bronco
06-18-2014, 06:04 AM
If I gave up on writing, I'd have to spend a lot more on art supplies. Luckily, I am far too oblivious to become discouraged.



It simply would not ever be a consideration, nor would be giving up delusions of grandeur.


I have a semi-colon, and I know how to use it; that is enough to sustain me.

Siri Kirpal
06-18-2014, 06:27 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

I write because I have something to say; when I no longer have something to say, I'll quit.

Those periods in my life when I've done without the making of art, music or literature were those times when I've most wished I could leave the planet. Not happier, not by a long stretch. I remember this whenever I consider giving writing up...as I did just a few days ago.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

RookieWriter
06-18-2014, 06:33 AM
I write fiction for myself first. Always have and probably always will. I don't think I ever felt I was going to be a professional fiction writer deep down. Knowing this gives me the freedom to write whatever I want, whenever I want, however I want. There are no feelings of anxiety about deadlines or "who would want to read this." It takes the pressure off and makes writing more enjoyable. I share it with a close friend or two who are also writers, but that's it.

noranne
06-18-2014, 09:10 AM
I did give it up for about 5 years. It wasn't really on purpose. I went off to college and joined the military and my whole life was uprooted and shaken around. After I graduated, I had some nostalgic recollections of spending my entire life pre-college writing, but I didn't really feel like it was very useful to pick it back up again as I knew I'd never likely make a living from it. Plus I was on my first tour as a division officer and trying to make my first serious relationship work and living on my own for the first time and all that.

And then one day I remember I was walking down by the water with my (at the time) husband, and we were talking about purpose and having goals and dreams and such. And I mentioned that I had never really had any ambition (besides a brief toying with the idea of politics) like some people who are determined to become doctors or architects or whatever. Except that I did have the writing thing, but that was silly. And I remember him telling me that it sounded like something I really loved and I should try it again. We shared a huge fishbowl drink on the pier and I felt all this excitement welling up inside of me at the idea of creating again.

I wouldn't say that I really missed it while I was gone. I was busy and had lots of other things to fill my time and mind. But once I got back to it, I regretted those lost years, and I think it would have added to my life to keep it up.

Will I do it forever? Who knows. If I can't get published, I will probably at some point hang it up. I love writing, but I write for people to read. And if people don't want to read what I'm writing, then it probably is not worth it to me. But I'm pretty stubborn so who knows at what point I might make that call. For now, I am full of things I want to write and I don't intend to stop anytime soon.

Dialogual
06-18-2014, 09:45 AM
About 2 years ago I stopped writing for close to 3 months.
At first it was over-burning because I was at the start and kinda over-reached myself a bit. Then my PC stopped working and I was too bummed to write on anything else.
And when I when I wrote, on a laptop, it felt so great.

thepicpic
06-18-2014, 11:44 AM
Writing is a double-edged sword for me. I enjoy it, I feel I have a real knack for it. I've gone about a week without writing now for various reasons and I'm already missing it.
On the flip side, I'm determined to get published and make some money out of it. I'm determined to finish the series I'm working on and prove the naysayers wrong. As a result, I tend to burn out (or explode) under the pressure, most of which is self-inflicted. I couldn't give it up but really, I probably shouldn't keep going the way I am.

EMaree
06-18-2014, 01:03 PM
If I gave up writing I'd disappear into video games for a little while, and then once I'm bored of all that leisure time I'd start putting all my extra energy into art.

Amanda Harper
06-18-2014, 01:29 PM
Very interesting conversations. I find that speech (or whatever it was) about western culture particularly intriguing. For me (for most of us, I'd imagine), writing is that passion and aspiration.

I know people who dream of being a doctor, of breaking out in music or photography or art. For me, it's writing. And I know that no matter what I do with my life, what career I pursue, my writing will always be that dream. So maybe it is holding me back. I'll never be as invested in my future job as I am in my writing.

I never thought I put pressure on myself with my writing, but it's an interesting take. But most of us don't write because we want to be famous authors. It's usuallly because we like writing.

So if I gave up writing, I would feel like something was missing. I need to write, even if it's only for myself. Writing (and reading) is my release from the stress that comes from the rest of my life -- relationships, studying, exams, thinking about the future.

Fingers
06-18-2014, 11:40 PM
[QUOTE
I write because I have something to say; when I no longer have something to say, I'll quit.

[/QUOTE]

This is me. I've been told that I am a good writer, but for some reason, writing does not seem to fulfill any real need for me. I haven't really written anything of substance for years and years now. It got very old to have people nag me for not writing because they couldn't understand how I could not. I used to write for myself, but found that I could not put on paper what was in my head in a way that I felt people would understand why I was writing. It was so frustrating that I gave up.

yer pal brian

BelleIvy
07-05-2014, 09:37 PM
I have anxiety and I noticed that writing helps A LOT. I also have things I want to say and stories I want to tell. Even though I didn't always write things down I was always thinking up stories. Writing gives me focus and purpose. I suppose it depends on a persons intentions with their writing and what they define as "success". I consider myself successful when I finish a story(editing and all). That's not to say I don't want to be published and earn a living from my writing I would LOVE to just be able to write as a career, but I am also prepared for that not being a reality for me. I will write whether what I write gets published or not. If writing becomes a source of stress or anxiety for people maybe it is time to give it up. I keep trying to win the lotto so I can just write and not worry about money lol. Lastly, my grandmother was a painter and a stay at home mom. She never made a living as a painter and at a certain point stopped showing her paintings in galleries because her paintings would "walk off" on their own. She mostly gave them away as gifts. Her painting are beautiful and the only thing we all have left of her. She painted for herself and to me she was a successful artist.

Cybernaught
07-05-2014, 09:47 PM
I did quit writing for a long time. Depression completely sapped away any passions or dreams I've ever had. Before I planned on killing myself, I tried writing again and found some hope.

So, if I quit writing, I would be dead.

Chase
07-05-2014, 09:59 PM
They can have my secret stash of pencils :chores and my keyboard :Hammer: after I've completely exhausted my last round from my last speedloader :guns: and they pry it all from my cold, dead fingers.

Gringa
07-05-2014, 10:06 PM
As long as I replace it with something I like more, no problem.

gothicangel
07-05-2014, 10:19 PM
I work for a major museum, and if I fully gave up writing I would throw myself fully into that. Other wise I would throw myself into my other passion: history. I'm currently studying for a second BA in Ancient History and Archaeology, so I think I would commit myself to becoming a history teacher.

I don't agree with what your friend said about passion. I think every one should have a passion. Its what inspires us to be motivated, committed and have aspirations. Being passionate isn't about becoming a NYT Bestseller, its about something that feeds our soul (not necessarily our bank account.)

I couldn't imagine going through life without a passion for something.

Persei
07-05-2014, 10:59 PM
I don't think I would give up on writing itself completely. I write for the sake of writing. It's pleasurable and fun, and I have far too much imagination. I need an outlet, and my outlet of choice is writing. While I do plan on trying to get published, I'm doing it just because it feels natural to do now that I have a complete novel that has a bit of potential (or so said my therapist haha). I don't put myself under the pressure of thinking that I must be published and I must sell well.

But I must write. Not because I subject myself to thinking I must, but because the ideas come and they'll bother me until I put them on paper.

I do give up on stressful projects, though. Or at least take very very long breaks. While I like completing novels, I don't feel like I have to. I'm ill, my routine is naturally stressful, I work, I have to study extra hours, and either way, I will do just fine without being a best-seller author.

The pressure of performing well on whatever job or task is overwhelming, though. I can definitely understand why some would give up on writing because of the pressure. Not to mention all the wasted hard work and the energy you have to put into it. :poke:

Dennis E. Taylor
07-05-2014, 11:11 PM
Screw that!

Thuro
07-05-2014, 11:11 PM
When I first saw the title my second thought was "My mind would explode".

MakanJuu
07-05-2014, 11:25 PM
There really wouldn't be all that much of a difference, seeing as how I don't really write too much now.

Although, I think if I completely gave up, I'd essentially be accepting the fact that I'll never do anything again. I can't get a real job, I can't go on SSI or disability & I still live with my mother. Writing is the only possibility I feel I have at actually having a life at some point.

Ken
07-06-2014, 01:20 AM
I would not be able to hang out with all of the nifty peeps on AW if I were to.

:cry:

sadron
07-06-2014, 01:50 PM
Can't do it. I'd go crazy if I won't write my stories that grow in my head. Also writing helps me with emotions from time to time.

Lavern08
07-06-2014, 04:07 PM
...That's like asking me to give up my Lavern-ness.

Ain't gonna happen! :tongue

J.S.F.
07-06-2014, 04:23 PM
...That's like asking me to give up my Lavern-ness.

Ain't gonna happen! :tongue

---

Yeah, and all you'd do is make threads about the months of the year.;)

DarthLolita
07-06-2014, 07:43 PM
I'd be really bored and probably super anxious all the time.

I noticed whenever I finish a WIP and don't have any more ideas (and am waiting some time before editing) I get all disoriented. I can't concentrate on reading or school work, or distract myself with video games/movies/the internet. I just hate not working on something. I can deal with it for a few weeks, but permanently? Terrifying D:

BreMiche
07-06-2014, 08:42 PM
I can never truly give up writing, not because I would become depressed or lose hope though. In fact, to not write for a while would allow me time to brush up on my other skills such as art (which leaves much to be desired), and web design. Yet I'd always come back to it. Writing is the fuel that feeds all my other passions.

It's what's most natural and quite frankly, both the easiest and hardest thing for me to do. Easy because I simply sit down and type or scribble, hard because I actually want it to be good.

gcommon
07-06-2014, 09:22 PM
I can't see myself giving up writing, because writing is what makes me happy. Even though I haven't yet got success from it. Like I tell people when they ask, writing is a lot like reading. It lets you escape into an alternate world where you leave the problems and stress of your life behind and get immersed in the lives of these fictional characters and new worlds. If someone is much happier giving up writing then maybe that isn't their calling.

SinisterCola
07-07-2014, 04:33 AM
For the longest time, I thought I hated writing. I gave up on it...or so I thought.

As many of said, you can't truly give up writing. Even when I actually stopped writing, I couldn't stop thinking about it. More often than not, a thought would pop up "what if I did a story about this?" or "huh, what if I had written my character like this?"

Eventually, I caved and well, it's back to writing for me! Darn you "bad" habits!

Cathryn
09-14-2014, 09:36 AM
I guess I would have to go back to painting my pictures in other media, Ink, chalk, oils, water color and so on. Have to tell the story somehow.

Lilfairy
09-14-2014, 10:10 AM
Unlike a lot of you on here, I've never had anything published (apart from a few poems in anthologies in my younger days) and I'm very aware that the chances of me making a living out of writing are quite slim. I write purely for my own enjoyment and because I always seem to have ideas forming in my mind.

As this is purely a hobby for me, I don't think I would ever stop writing.

Hyperminimalism
09-15-2014, 07:25 AM
Unfortunately, I have had to give it up since I am no longer able to write anything without feeling immense anxiety. I'm not entirely sure what happened, but it's something I'm still coming to terms with and it is difficult because writing for me has always been a way to release my thoughts and be creative.

Poet of Gore
09-15-2014, 07:57 AM
if giving up writing makes you happy then do it. I have been writing all my life...even when it was some stupid little daily page of stuff i put on the cover of my notebook.

i write for myself. i write the type of shit i want to read.

Moldy
09-16-2014, 06:14 AM
I don't agree with what your friend said about passion. I think every one should have a passion. Its what inspires us to be motivated, committed and have aspirations. Being passionate isn't about becoming a NYT Bestseller, its about something that feeds our soul (not necessarily our bank account.)

I couldn't imagine going through life without a passion for something.

I agree with you on that. The English-major mother didn't have to give up writing to get rid of that pressure, she just had to get rid of that feeling of "I must succeed at [X arbitrary goal that defines one as a writing success"].

Most of us aren't going to be billionaires or movie-stars or NYT Bestsellers, but what does that signify? Just because we have to keep a day job as a plumber or teacher or salesperson doesn't mean we have to give up our creative outlets and sit in front of the TV all day.

The pressure to be a success at writing as defined by society does kill the joy, satisfaction and freedom of writing for a lot of people but...that doesn't mean writing is the issue or cause and should be given up. Learning to kick society out of your writing room is the real issue that would eliminate the stress. Giving up writing to get rid of that--talk about throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

Mmlaw95
09-16-2014, 06:37 AM
If I gave up writing, I wouldn't know what to do with myself.

I write a little bit each day. If I go a day without writing, I usually end up feeling bored. I need an outlet for my creativity. Whenever I get home I try to find time to write. I don't really watch TV all that much anymore because it doesn't interest me. I usually like to draw, write, or read instead. :)

JimmyB27
09-18-2014, 03:19 PM
I can't imagine why I'd be so cruel as to deprive the world of my genius.

Melanii
09-18-2014, 05:29 PM
If I spent all of my time just watching movies/TV, playing video games, hanging out, eating out, go on vacations, etc, I would probably feel so lost, because there's no more sense of purpose left. I'd just consume and be entertained, and if that's all there is, I'd feel quite empty inside.

Sure, I have other creative passions like composing music, drawing/painting, photography, and filmmaking, but in all of them, the main ingredient that drives my creative sparks is storytelling. My music all convey emotions and tell stories. My artworks do the same--they often feature characters from my stories. Filmmaking is of course, arguably the most important form of storytelling in today's culture. Photography is about the only one where storytelling isn't as important to me (though plenty of photographers emphasize storytelling).

Yes, writing can be stressful, frustrating, and depressing, but it also gives me a sense of purpose in life. Storytelling has always been a huge part of my life, and it just comes so naturally to me that I can't even stop the ideas from flowing freely all the time. I would feel like an aimless driftwood if I were to give it up.

Everything in bold would apply to me if I stopped writing. The strikeouts mean it doesn't apply to me, but the drawing thing sure does.

Ever since I was a little girl I remember wanting to do nothing more than write. And I don't recall much of anything about my childhood due to a concussion.

Right now, at this stage of my life, at 26 years old, I struggle with finding my purpose for living. I have no job, I can't drive, I have these overwhelming negative feelings because of Bipolar II (only sometimes, and randomly, do I get manic), I'm paranoid and nervous about everything due to PTSD, and I have the hardest time getting up to become fit and healthy.

People buy me gifts, take me to restaurants or events, and I'm just THERE.

In reality, writing makes me feel sane. It gives me some sort of grip on who I am as a person. I can't give back to the people that has helped me. If I don't write, then I will just be wasting time and all my creativity will be for nothing.

I have stories to tell, dammit, and I'm going to tell them. I don't care about being famous or a best-seller. I just want to do the only thing I love and prove to myself that I can be a somebody if I keep at it.

JoshSpaceCole
09-18-2014, 07:22 PM
I think if you can give up, it's best to. Writing is hard and dumb and time-consuming. A relationship with a muse tends to be pretty unhealthy.

I wish I could quit, but I can't. Without it, all these terrible universes just stay in my head and press at my skull. If I don't ease the pressure, I start forgetting which ones are real. It's a mess.

Amy_D
09-18-2014, 07:26 PM
I'd probably get a lot more housework done.

(Yes, I'm THAT boring.)

Taylor Harbin
09-18-2014, 07:27 PM
I have stories to tell, dammit, and I'm going to tell them. I don't care about being famous or a best-seller. I just want to do the only thing I love and prove to myself that I can be a somebody if I keep at it.

What he said. :)

Melanii
09-18-2014, 09:07 PM
What she said. :)

I'm a girl. >>;;

Moldy
09-19-2014, 01:03 AM
I'm a girl. >>;;

Normally I don't look askance at pronoun slips, but when the user has "Miss" or "Mister" in their name it's kind of a dead giveaway :)