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Forbidden Snowflake
06-11-2014, 01:53 PM
Good morning!

I have a question: Anyone else, when they see too much work in front of them, just end up not doing a single thing?

I just moved in with my partner. New house. New country (for me at least: UK/north of London) and now I'm sitting here at this table with my laptop and 2 dogs... and literally no other furniture.

There were 3 boys in here for the last 7 years and they've literally never cleaned this house. I think.

The washing machine was mouldy. Landlord replaced it yay. Dryer works and dishwasher works. Yay.

The oven got cleaned this weekend. It was utterly disgusting. Found an old french fry in it, probably from 2004.

The bathroom needs a new cabinet, this one looks rusty and dirty.

The built in fridge doesn't cool enough (10 degrees is all it manages, sigh). I have literally no idea how to take it out of the cabinet to see whether or not the fans are working properly.

We need to get furniture but the dogs decided 'it's a new place so we have newly found separation anxiety that we have never had before' and just cry bloody murder whenever we leave the house.

The garden is a mess, the grass has never been cut and there's dirt lying around. The shed has no floor.

And I can't do much before we can't buy the furniture. I'd love to get it delivered but I do need to look at it first, don't I? (btw, the sofa we fell in love with is too wide by 4 inches.)

We have a bed. So, that's a good. And obviously a table.

I'm just impatient for it to be all in place. And every day I see new corners that clearly have never seen a clean before.

And there's about 24 boxes in the sitting room waiting to be emptied.

And my plan was to get back into writing. Unfortunately I'm one of those people who stress out and then do nothing. At all. I'm an adult, shouldn't I be over that?

(That's without even mentioning the big change for me, left job, home, friends, country and am now sitting here with the tea drinking people of Britain...)

:Wha:

mirandashell
06-11-2014, 02:31 PM
Ok, first thing - a big deep breath, stroke the dogs and finish your tea.

Then, write a list of must absolutely be done now. Then a list of what can wait.

You have the basics that people need. A table, a bed, something to cook on and something to wash in. Everything else can be done in its time.

It's all baby steps. One thing at a time. In my experience, that's the only way not to get overwhelmed.

alleycat
06-11-2014, 02:38 PM
Yes, make a list of things as suggested by mirandashell, then take a new sheet of page and write down the ONE THING that you will do next (only one!); make it a single task, even if it's part of a larger overall job.

When you have done that one thing, put a check by it and then list only the one next thing you want to do. Rinse and repeat.

Forbidden Snowflake
06-11-2014, 03:18 PM
Ok, first thing - a big deep breath, stroke the dogs and finish your tea.

I'm a coffee drinker and moved to England :flag:

Made the list. It's huge.



Yes, make a list of things as suggested by mirandashell, then take a new sheet of page and write down the ONE THING that you will do next (only one!); make it a single task, even if it's part of a larger overall job.

That sounds like it might work. I will try.

Thank you both!

Fictional Cowboy
06-11-2014, 06:18 PM
Yes, you need to see the furniture before you buy it and have it shipped. I could never buy furniture without seeing it.


Didn't you get to see the house before accepting it?
Didn't the landlord make sure it was cleaned before you moved in?
If the fridge doesn't cool properly, isn't that the landlord's job to fix/replace it?
Are the yard/garden your responsibility as a renter?


If the previous tenants didn't clean anything or mow the yard or tend the garden (and YOU'RE expected to take care of these things) then you need to talk to your landlord and tell him that you expect at least half a month's rent credit for having to clean up behind the last tenants. A DECENT landlord would have made sure the house was clean BEFORE you moved in.

Sorry, but you hit on two big things for me. First, I have to see my furniture before I buy it. Secondly, the same applies to where I'm going to live. I have to see it before I move in. In your case, I can see why you might not have been able to. You moved to a new country. But, what about your partner? Did they? If not, did you ask the landlord about the condition and terms? If you're expected to keep it clean and work the yard and garden, and the last tenants did NOT, then you can tell the landlord that it's NOT part of the terms for you to clean up after THEM. Therefore, figure out what you think would be fair compensation and tell the landlord. If they makes a fuss, ask them why THEY didn't clean the house before YOU moved in. Why should you be expected to clean up behind the previous tenants?

Just a personal hot button for me.

As for motivation, you can either chip away at all the work slowly and get some writing done all the while, or you can say, "Forget it. I can't live like this." Put the writing aside, bite the bullet and spend a week or two getting everything done so you can enjoy the place and write.

As you could probably tell, I'd go for the second option. Where I live is important to me and I'd want things clean, organized, and working so I could enjoy it. If you take the time to slowly chip away at it, it could take twice as long to get everything done. I'd rather just do it and get it over with.

Forbidden Snowflake
06-11-2014, 06:55 PM
Yes, you need to see the furniture before you buy it and have it shipped. I could never buy furniture without seeing it.


Didn't you get to see the house before accepting it?
Didn't the landlord make sure it was cleaned before you moved in?
If the fridge doesn't cool properly, isn't that the landlord's job to fix/replace it?
Are the yard/garden your responsibility as a renter?




I've seen the house before the previous tenants moved out and I knew there would be a lot of work to do. They literally had never cleaned the place, ever. He got it cleaned by apparently a pretty bad cleaning company that missed things, like the oven. So he got another cleaner in just for the oven last weekend. He didn't realise the washing machine and the dishwasher were broken and got us new machines. Promptly. The rooms are newly painted. The bathroom got a new shower cabinet. He's done a lot.

There was a storm at some point a few months ago that ripped the shed apart and the lawn hasn't been mowed. We said we would do that. It's his responsibility to provide us with a lawnmower but it's ours to keep the garden clean.

If I could leave the dogs alone I could have gotten all furniture last weekend and I'd be happily building. Since I'm in a new country, I don't have anyone yet, I trust, to look after the dogs.

We have one working fridge in the storage room, so the fridge isn't the most pressing problem. It's the one in the kitchen, built in, that doesn't cool properly. The landlord figured out the dishwasher didn't work before we moved in and replaced it. The washing machine we discovered was mouldy this weekend and we called him and he replaced it within 24 hours. It just adds to the stress that there's so much to do. Like the door to the garden doesn't close properly etc.

He's a childhood friend of my partner and a) doesn't mind the dogs b) is renting it below market value so I'm not keen on moaning too much.

His brothers were living here before and I think he did not realise how much they had ran the place into the ground. And we like the idea of getting the freedom that we can do whatever we want with this house.

I saw it was a mess but I also saw it has potential. I just didn't realise the mess would be as overwhelming. Especially because my partner is working in a new job since beginning of May and can't just take a week off during the probation period.

I'm hoping the dogs will let us get the furniture this weekend so I can start unpacking and make it feel a bit more like home.

Kylabelle
06-11-2014, 07:28 PM
Mirandashell and alleycat's advice is close to what I would suggest, but were I in your situation I would be putting some extra attention to the dogs (I know mirandashell included them; I would do more though. :) )

IMO animals are more psychically sensitive than most humans and pick up on tensions in the environment we might not notice or notice fully.

Aside from the stress of moving -- and if they had to fly? That is potentially traumatic for pets, though they can recover, but it's not a small thing -- there are also the unfamiliar smells, sounds, and atmosphere of a place that *may not be safe!*

So while the whole living situation is stressful, I would nonetheless put the dogs' peace of mind first for a little while. Extra attention and calm atmosphere and reassuring them that it's really okay, etc.

Also, were I in your shoes, I would do some kind of energy clearing on the space. I don't know what your personal beliefs are, of course, but even something as simple as going into each room and stating "This is now our home, my home, and I intend it will be peaceful and wholesome" can be a useful step to take. And of course if you have spiritual or religious beliefs, that can inspire you. It's a kind of consecration, and IMO it's as helpful as physical cleaning, for making a home.

If everything that goes on is more stressful and agitated, the dogs will feel that, of course.

So, in addition to what mirandashell and alleycat advised, first I would tend the dogs and tend the energy of the space.

And yeah, I do that thing, of going catatonic when there's too much to do. I totally sympathize. :D

Good luck!

Forbidden Snowflake
06-11-2014, 07:34 PM
IMO animals are more psychically sensitive than most humans and pick up on tensions in the environment we might not notice or notice fully.

Aside from the stress of moving -- and if they had to fly? That is potentially traumatic for pets, though they can recover, but it's not a small thing -- there are also the unfamiliar smells, sounds, and atmosphere of a place that *may not be safe!*



No flying. It was possible to do it by car. And I wouldn't want my very alert/nervous Australian Shepherd to fly if I can avoid it. It was a 12 hour car journey though and he was very stressed.

I spent the first week sitting on a big blanket with both dogs. Literally. My partner left in the morning for work and I sat down and had both dogs with me. And we were just calm. Then I'd let them explore garden and house. In the evening a short walk. And back onto the blanket of peace.

They now both seem relaxed. Which is probably why I'm starting to notice what else has to be done.

Fictional Cowboy
06-11-2014, 08:21 PM
I've seen the house before the previous tenants moved out and I knew there would be a lot of work to do. They literally had never cleaned the place, ever. He got it cleaned by apparently a pretty bad cleaning company that missed things, like the oven. So he got another cleaner in just for the oven last weekend. He didn't realise the washing machine and the dishwasher were broken and got us new machines. Promptly. The rooms are newly painted. The bathroom got a new shower cabinet. He's done a lot.

There was a storm at some point a few months ago that ripped the shed apart and the lawn hasn't been mowed. We said we would do that. It's his responsibility to provide us with a lawnmower but it's ours to keep the garden clean.

If I could leave the dogs alone I could have gotten all furniture last weekend and I'd be happily building. Since I'm in a new country, I don't have anyone yet, I trust, to look after the dogs.

We have one working fridge in the storage room, so the fridge isn't the most pressing problem. It's the one in the kitchen, built in, that doesn't cool properly. The landlord figured out the dishwasher didn't work before we moved in and replaced it. The washing machine we discovered was mouldy this weekend and we called him and he replaced it within 24 hours. It just adds to the stress that there's so much to do. Like the door to the garden doesn't close properly etc.

He's a childhood friend of my partner and a) doesn't mind the dogs b) is renting it below market value so I'm not keen on moaning too much.

His brothers were living here before and I think he did not realise how much they had ran the place into the ground. And we like the idea of getting the freedom that we can do whatever we want with this house.

I saw it was a mess but I also saw it has potential. I just didn't realise the mess would be as overwhelming. Especially because my partner is working in a new job since beginning of May and can't just take a week off during the probation period.

I'm hoping the dogs will let us get the furniture this weekend so I can start unpacking and make it feel a bit more like home.

I'm glad to hear all of this! It changes everything.

You're fortunate to have a wonderful landlord. That's not an easy thing to find! When it becomes a two-way street (you making things easier on him, too), it will make all future dealings easy and pleasant.

It sounds like he's willing to get the appliances taken care of and tried to get in a cleaning service (even if they were horrible). At that point, I would thank him and let him know that you'll just do the rest yourself because of how much he's already done. The lawn and garden may take some extra care in the beginning but, as long as he provides the tools, it's worth doing without a fuss because of how great he's been. If the built-in fridge ends up needing replacing, let him know it's not a rush because you have the other one. That will take some pressure off of him but he's still likely to get to it quickly because you're not making a big fuss.

I adopted a cat from the shelter when he was a kitten. He was raised in an apartment that I eventually moved from. When everything was packed up and furniture moved around, he stressed out and threw up everywhere. It was so hard on him. Thankfully, when I moved into the new apartment, he took to it right away and seemed unmoved by it.

As someone who's trained animals, don't overdo the time on the safety blanket with them. I know that's hard but they can come to rely on you being on it with them and it will take much longer for them to adjust. Go about cleaning and talk to them while you're doing it.

Try going outside yourself, without them, for a few minutes and then come back inside. They need to know that you'll always return. Make each trip outside a little longer. Maybe take a walk around the block. If you can, get them a big rawhide bone to chew on while you're gone. Most dogs like them. Just make sure it's not something they can chew up in a few minutes. Give them the rawhide only when you leave and put it away when you come back. It will be something they can expect when you leave. It also serves as a sign of what's coming (you're leaving the house). It serves as a symbol of your absence. They may still cry and whine a bit but, especially if they're bigger dogs, they'll comfort themselves with the big rawhide bone.

I've done this with people who have bigger dogs who cried when the owners left. It wasn't long before the dogs saw the rawhide as a fun treat. It made the owner leaving bearable. Then, if you want to get them off the rawhide habit, just give them smaller and smaller pieces gradually.

MaryMumsy
06-11-2014, 08:59 PM
My situation is different, but similar. I inherited a house, six hour drive away. I need to remove 40+ years of clutter. We were just there for four days and made progress. At least there is furniture etc. Our plan is to take one small task at a time, one dresser drawer, or one closet. Breaking it down into small pieces makes it easier.

Best of luck.

MM

Kylabelle
06-11-2014, 09:14 PM
No flying. It was possible to do it by car. And I wouldn't want my very alert/nervous Australian Shepherd to fly if I can avoid it. It was a 12 hour car journey though and he was very stressed.

I spent the first week sitting on a big blanket with both dogs. Literally. My partner left in the morning for work and I sat down and had both dogs with me. And we were just calm. Then I'd let them explore garden and house. In the evening a short walk. And back onto the blanket of peace.

They now both seem relaxed. Which is probably why I'm starting to notice what else has to be done.

That's great. I bet once you get going you'll find some momentum.

Enjoy the new house! To me, it sounds like so much fun, to set up a new place, even with all the cleaning that has to be done first. :)

Siri Kirpal
06-11-2014, 09:57 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Something I found made our last move go easier. We'd take care of a few essential items first. Then in the evening, we'd put up some artwork or knick-knacks, before tackling another round of important items the next day. It helped immensely to give the place the feel of home.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Fictional Cowboy
06-11-2014, 10:48 PM
I always notice when people say they're moving. My heart really goes out to them because it's hard for most people. It's not fun and people rarely get enough help to make the job easier. I sympathize for people because there are things like that for me. Moving just isn't one of them. I love it.

I have everything boxed up really well and labeled by the night before. It's arranged to make it easier to load and unload into the truck. And, by the first morning in my new place, I already have every stick of furniture in place and everything where it should be, including all the decor. Unpacking is an absolute breeze for me. When I wake up that first morning, it already looks like I've lived there forever. Whenever people have said, "We'll come by tomorrow to help you unpack and move the furniture around." I always say, "That would be great, thanks!" Then, when they come, we just relax and have some lunch!

I don't say this very often because people tend to get really mad... until they need my help moving.

mirandashell
06-11-2014, 10:57 PM
I hate moving. It always amazes me how much stuff I've acccumulated and it's always really difficult to decide what to take and what to dump.

Fictional Cowboy
06-11-2014, 11:20 PM
I hate moving. It always amazes me how much stuff I've acccumulated and it's always really difficult to decide what to take and what to dump.

I used to be like that. I'm single and I used to rent three bedroom houses and fully furnished them! I had people spend their vacations at my house as a place to get away!

Eventually, I got tired of "stuff." I downsized from a three bedroom home to a one bedroom apartment. Now I'm in a studio apartment and I only own what I use often. If I see something in my apartment that I haven't used in six months, I give it away. (Not sell.) I don't own a TV, radio, stereo, CDs, DVDs, or a microwave. I've cooked from scratch my entire life and if there's anything I want to watch or listen to, I can do that on my computer for free. I have a 10 year old flip phone because it still works perfectly. No smart phone for me. The only reason I even have a cell phone is because they're (still) cheaper than a land line. I treat it like a land line though. I don't need to be reached every minute of the day. I don't need apps and widgets and social media. I've lived without them longer than they've been around.

Think of the money I've saved. I also have a LOT more time than most people, too. Stuff eats your money AND your time and just adds stress. I prefer living simply. Part of that is owning only what I use.

Forbidden Snowflake
06-12-2014, 10:11 AM
As someone who's trained animals, don't overdo the time on the safety blanket with them. I know that's hard but they can come to rely on you being on it with them and it will take much longer for them to adjust. Go about cleaning and talk to them while you're doing it.

Try going outside yourself, without them, for a few minutes and then come back inside. They need to know that you'll always return. Make each trip outside a little longer. Maybe take a walk around the block. If you can, get them a big rawhide bone to chew on while you're gone. Most dogs like them. Just make sure it's not something they can chew up in a few minutes. Give them the rawhide only when you leave and put it away when you come back. It will be something they can expect when you leave. It also serves as a sign of what's coming (you're leaving the house). It serves as a symbol of your absence. They may still cry and whine a bit but, especially if they're bigger dogs, they'll comfort themselves with the big rawhide bone.

I've done this with people who have bigger dogs who cried when the owners left. It wasn't long before the dogs saw the rawhide as a fun treat. It made the owner leaving bearable. Then, if you want to get them off the rawhide habit, just give them smaller and smaller pieces gradually.

Unfortunately my dog doesn't find rawhide interesting. He licks and then leaves it be. Any other thing (pig ears etc.) he wolves down in matter of minutes. I try and freeze a kong for him but even that he usually manages to finish within the first half hour.

I've gotten off the blanket a few days ago and now do my regular house stuff, cleaning etc. while they're walking around and watch me do it. They're slowly starting to settle in. I've been leaving them alone for 5-10 minutes every few hours and walked around the block. It's gradually getting better.

Thanks for your advice :)



My situation is different, but similar. I inherited a house, six hour drive away. I need to remove 40+ years of clutter. We were just there for four days and made progress. At least there is furniture etc. Our plan is to take one small task at a time, one dresser drawer, or one closet. Breaking it down into small pieces makes it easier.

Best of luck.

MM

We are trying to break it down. Tonight we'll try and go look at the furniture we picked. Hopefully we like it so we can order it.




Think of the money I've saved. I also have a LOT more time than most people, too. Stuff eats your money AND your time and just adds stress. I prefer living simply. Part of that is owning only what I use.

I admire this. I couldn't live without stuff on the internet.

However I got rid of my whole household and moved with 3 boxes of books and DVDs and 5 boardgames and a suitcase of my clothes. Everything else got thrown.

It felt good.

mirandashell
06-12-2014, 12:00 PM
Think of the money I've saved. I also have a LOT more time than most people, too. Stuff eats your money AND your time and just adds stress. I prefer living simply. Part of that is owning only what I use

I think you've made a bit of an unwarranted assumption here. I don't buy the latest TVs and smartphones. I'm not a conspicuous consumer.

The 'stuff' I have is things like bills and bank statements that I keep for future reference. Letters and cards from people to remind me of them. Manuscripts from old WIPs. Books that stretch back into my childhood. Paintings that make me feel good when I look at them. A sewing machine that I use to make clothes. My computer. (I'm assuming you have one of those?)

Some of us don't actually see the benefit of pretending to live in the 19th Century.

Helix
06-12-2014, 12:16 PM
I hate moving. It always amazes me how much stuff I've acccumulated and it's always really difficult to decide what to take and what to dump.

Oh, goodness, yes! Every time I swear I am going to throw out all the stuff I don't need, but invariably end up shifting some of it.

I've been in this place for a smidge over a year and the owner has now decided she's going to sell it. I'd only just unpacked the final box from the last move.

(Sorry, Forbidden Snowflake! I didn't mean to hijack your thread. It struck a chord.)

I fond that making lists is the absolutely best way to deal with things, as (almost?) everyone's said. Prioritising the tasks and then carrying them out -- that's not always so easy!

Forbidden Snowflake
06-12-2014, 02:53 PM
Oh, goodness, yes! Every time I swear I am going to throw out all the stuff I don't need, but invariably end up shifting some of it.


Highjacking is good :)

I always ended up shifting some of it. But now that I moved in a car a 1'000 miles with the dog I actually HAD to limit myself to 4 boxes and that's all I've brought.

Kylabelle
06-12-2014, 03:54 PM
Wow! Four boxes! That's amazing.

I agree that much is simplified by simplifying and reducing one's possessions. I've moved much more often than I had any desire to in the last decade, and each time I have pared down more.

I also agree that most people (those who don't move often for sure! as I did earlier on) tend to accumulate and feel attached to more stuff than I have ended up with. I see this in the homes of others who've been there for years and years, and when *they* have to move it can be quite the upset.

:)

One good thing about having to go through the process of paring down, I found, is I don't have the same level of resistance now to discarding or refusing to acquire things I really don't need or take pleasure from. I give away stuff easily because I know how much hassle it is to keep it with me if I have to up and move! Lightening the load has lightened my spirit, too, somehow, or so it seems.

ETA: Mirandashell, the kinds of things you list are the kinds of things I still hang onto also, especially the books and the paintings. Although I have pared down into all those categories too, in the last two moves, including the mementos.

Forbidden Snowflake
06-12-2014, 07:36 PM
https://www.flickr.com/photos/8014074@N08/sets/72157644711654429/

Pictures if anyone is interested. Sorry for the mess. And the mostly emptiness.

Also if anyone sees more than 4 boxes. My partner didn't downsize quite as much.

mirandashell
06-12-2014, 07:37 PM
That seems to be a link to a Yahoo account sign-in......

Forbidden Snowflake
06-12-2014, 07:45 PM
That seems to be a link to a Yahoo account sign-in......

Uh-hoh... whoops. Fixed it hopefully?

Snowstorm
06-12-2014, 07:47 PM
Made the list. It's huge.


This reminds me when, many years ago, I was overwhelmed and physically and emotionally exhausted in a job that was over-the-top tough. When I moved into the cutest house, I made a list of everything that had to be done at home, regardless if it was one minute or hours to finish that task. (I'm a firm believer that when I write things down it's out of my head and I don't have to track them in my overworked mind) I separated out the list to two: one was for easy one-hour or less tasks and the other was for bigger tasks for the weekend.

No matter how fried I was at the end of the day, I took one task of the easy list. Then I was done for the day and could relax without any guilt. On the weekends, I did at least one task off the harder list. Within a couple months, both lists were gone and I felt great.

mirandashell
06-12-2014, 07:53 PM
Uh-hoh... whoops. Fixed it hopefully?

Yep, got it!

I agree with Snowstorm. Better to pat yourself on the back for how much you have done rather than beat yourself up for what you haven't done.

The place doesn't look too bad. Although I'm guessing the photos of the kitchen are dark for a reason? :D

I reckon it will look really good when it is done.

Forbidden Snowflake
06-12-2014, 07:55 PM
Yep, got it!

I agree with Snowstorm. Better to pat yourself on the back for how much you have done rather than beat yourself up for what you haven't done.

The place doesn't look too bad. Although I'm guessing the photos of the kitchen are dark for a reason? :D

I reckon it will look really good when it is done.

We've been in for 2 weeks today and mostly it's clean. I don't know yet how to get between the oven and the kitchen cupboards the gap is small and it looks horrendous. We're leaving the dogs alone tonight and will go look at furniture. So hopefully this weekend we can build and clean the remaining bits.

I've made the list. And I divided it into rooms. So I can see which room needs the least doing and start there. I have the impression once I have a few rooms that are 'done' I feel less stressed.

MaryMumsy
06-12-2014, 08:03 PM
We moved often when I was a child. The military tends to do that. I've been in this house 39 years last week, and clearing it out would be a nightmare. After what we are doing at the house I inherited, we are going to do the same thing here. One week there, three weeks here. This is a much bigger house.

MM

mirandashell
06-12-2014, 08:20 PM
I've made the list. And I divided it into rooms. So I can see which room needs the least doing and start there. I have the impression once I have a few rooms that are 'done' I feel less stressed.


I agree that's a wise way of doing it. You can see your progress much more easily that way.

mirandashell
06-12-2014, 08:21 PM
We moved often when I was a child. The military tends to do that. I've been in this house 39 years last week, and clearing it out would be a nightmare. After what we are doing at the house I inherited, we are going to do the same thing here. One week there, three weeks here. This is a much bigger house.

MM

My Mom was an expert packer and mover when I was little for exactly the same reason.

Fictional Cowboy
06-13-2014, 12:41 AM
I think you've made a bit of an unwarranted assumption here. I don't buy the latest TVs and smartphones. I'm not a conspicuous consumer.

The 'stuff' I have is things like bills and bank statements that I keep for future reference. Letters and cards from people to remind me of them. Manuscripts from old WIPs. Books that stretch back into my childhood. Paintings that make me feel good when I look at them. A sewing machine that I use to make clothes. My computer. (I'm assuming you have one of those?)

Some of us don't actually see the benefit of pretending to live in the 19th Century.

I wouldn't call my assumption "unwarranted." When people talk about accumulating stuff over the years and hate dragging it from place to place with them, they're rarely talking about years worth of paperwork, but physical items. That's what I was referring to, evidence by my comment about how stuff can eat people's time and money. Paperwork doesn't do that. If you've not accumulated those things, that's great.

What is unwarranted, however, is your rudeness in replying. I didn't put anyone down. We were all commenting from our own experiences. Mine are equally as valid as yours. I'm not "pretending to live in the 19th Century" and I didn't say you or anyone else should live like I do. Also, the assumption that you made is where I'm saving money. Buying a TV isn't overly expensive. The real money I saved came from years of monthly bills for service. When you're going to accuse someone of something "unwarranted" and then proceed with rude comments, it's best to make sure you're not committing the same "offense." Especially since I wasn't being rude or condescending in any way. I told my experience and didn't say anyone else should do it. I'm all for differing opinions. Condescension, I can do without.

mirandashell
06-13-2014, 02:14 AM
Well, I apologise if you found me rude, but I found you patronising.

So what goes around comes around, I guess.

Helix
06-13-2014, 04:37 AM
I've made the list. And I divided it into rooms. So I can see which room needs the least doing and start there. I have the impression once I have a few rooms that are 'done' I feel less stressed.

Sounds like the best way to do it. I hope you've got plenty of treats to keep you going through the point where you're thinking that it wouldn't be that bad to live with all these half-empty boxes and drifts of scrunched up paper. You know, it's not so much a mess as an art installation.

mirandashell
06-13-2014, 04:10 PM
You know, it's not so much a mess as an art installation.


:D I've been there a few times!