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mrabsolutefan
06-06-2014, 02:48 AM
Are tests and exams conducted solely in written format or are verbal tests also conducted? A little information on this would be appreciated.

I am talking about both admission tests and the general grade-level tests, if any (not the standardized tests).

School is set in contemporary, NY NY.

Another question:

Hypothetically speaking, if someone other than the legal guardian of the student asks for information pertaining to the student's grading and performance, say, 12 years after the student has passed the school, will it be made available to him and if so what's the process?

Thanks. :)

wendymarlowe
06-06-2014, 04:07 AM
Most of my daughter's tests are done on computer nowadays - the teacher may ask some things orally and ask the kids to mark the answer in the program, or the kids may need to read for themselves.

Williebee
06-06-2014, 04:10 AM
It depends on the child. If the child has an IEP (http://www.ncld.org/students-disabilities/iep-504-plan/what-is-iep) that specifies oral testing, the child would/should be given oral testing. This would apply in both public or private schools. It would also apply to the schools test as well as the state standardized testing. (Making that happen has been one of the interesting challenges for PARCC and SmarterBalance testing, btw.)

Not sure what you mean by "admissions test."

cornflake
06-06-2014, 04:23 AM
Are tests and exams conducted solely in written format or are verbal tests also conducted? A little information on this would be appreciated.

I am talking about both admission tests and the general grade-level tests, if any (not the standardized tests).

School is set in contemporary, NY NY.

Another question:

Hypothetically speaking, if someone other than the legal guardian of the student asks for information pertaining to the student's grading and performance, say, 12 years after the student has passed the school, will it be made available to him and if so what's the process?

Thanks. :)

Generally not oral, except in some cases. There's part of the NYS test that's a passage read to students, followed by comprehension questions that are printed and responded to on paper. I don't know of any entry tests that have any oral components, except (private, obvs.) schools that require testing beyond like, ISEE or the like - like if they require IQ testing, some of the subtests are oral-based, but that's not really a school test.

In general, there might be some school or class doing something but the only thing I can think of is spelling tests - the teacher says the word and you have to write it. Some do those differently too, but that's a classic.

As to the second question, I assume you mean not the student, who would, I believe, be the only person with access at that age, hell to the no.


It depends on the child. If the child has an IEP (http://www.ncld.org/students-disabilities/iep-504-plan/what-is-iep) that specifies oral testing, the child would/should be given oral testing. This would apply in both public or private schools. It would also apply to the schools test as well as the state standardized testing. (Making that happen has been one of the interesting challenges for PARCC and SmarterBalance testing, btw.)

Not sure what you mean by "admissions test."

In general, IEPs only are offered by and apply to public schools. Private schools aren't required to provide jack. In the specific, rare cases like when the public schools in the district cannot offer required accommodations and thus pay the private school or there's a planned transfer the IEP requirements may carry, though the private school can decide to not accept the student(s) regardless.

Williebee
06-06-2014, 04:29 AM
In general, IEPs only are offered by and apply to public schools. Private schools aren't required to provide jack. In the specific, rare cases like when the public schools in the district cannot offer required accommodations and thus pay the private school or there's a planned transfer the IEP requirements may carry, though the private school can decide to not accept the student(s) regardless.

Not quite accurate. (http://www.ncld.org/parents-child-disabilities/idea-guide/chapter-9-students-private-school-understanding-your-childs-special-education-options)
I should have said, "may" apply for private schools, or "will apply dependent upon certain conditions."

In short, "it depends."

There's factors like how the student arrived in private school, where they live (what state, what demographics, what the school systems and state can afford, etc.)

jaksen
06-06-2014, 05:28 AM
Teacher-made tests and tests which 'come from the book' are still generally printed on paper, and the students take the test on paper.

State-mandated tests are sometimes taken on computer, or on forms that will be corrected by a machine. How the student takes the test will depend on the resources available to the school.

I retired as a teacher in 2009 and the school was moving toward all standardized, or state testing done on computer. Problem is, with over 1,000 students in the school...

Well, there were nowhere near that many computers, even including laptops and tablets, in the school.

As for IEPs, in the state of MA, if a private school requested the assistance of the local public school in testing a student, or writing an IEP, and even providing some resources to assist that student, the public school had to comply.

C.bronco
06-06-2014, 06:09 AM
Not quite accurate. (http://www.ncld.org/parents-child-disabilities/idea-guide/chapter-9-students-private-school-understanding-your-childs-special-education-options)
I should have said, "may" apply for private schools, or "will apply dependent upon certain conditions."

In short, "it depends."

There's factors like how the student arrived in private school, where they live (what state, what demographics, what the school systems and state can afford, etc.)

Private schools follow the recommendations provided by the school district and apply to College Board And Act For corresponding accommodations. IF the family shares the iep, that is. We have district professionals evaluate children every year,and work with them through the process.