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View Full Version : Can person with Albinism get tattooed?



Blinkk
06-01-2014, 09:43 PM
I'm pretty sure they can (technically, wouldn't the tat come out awesome on a person with Albinism? There's no pigment to fight). I wanted to drop this question anyway, just to check and make sure it's all good.

Any risks/things to know before tattooing in such a situation?

amergina
06-01-2014, 10:17 PM
Well, Johnney Winter has a number of tattoos....

Maryn
06-01-2014, 10:31 PM
Amergina beat me to it. Those Winter boys are inked. I'm having trouble finding decent views of Edgar's tats, but Johnny's all over the internet.

Johnny (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_jJAG_tiB6jQ/TKUnr4cd5_I/AAAAAAAAE5c/quWiTg-gDFQ/s1600/Johnny+Winters+DVD+cover.jpg). More Johnny (http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-JXyEIDpK6uQ/Ti6ljNiGUUI/AAAAAAAAJ7Y/tX7NkStHSgE/s1600/johnny-winter-tattoos-2.jpg).

ULTRAGOTHA
06-01-2014, 10:32 PM
I see no reason why they can't. Ink ought to go under their skin just as well as under ours. They're only missing melatonin.

I can ask my albino friend with two albino sisters if you want.

TellMeAStory
06-01-2014, 10:46 PM
Melanin. Ultragotha meant Melanin, not melatonin.

jeseymour
06-01-2014, 10:59 PM
Please use the term "person with Albinism" instead of albino. And please make sure you don't have them be a sharpshooter. People with Albinism have extremely poor vision. I have a daughter with Albinism. She actually has a rare form where she is developing pigment as she gets older, and she actually got her drivers license, with a note from her eye doctor. When she was a toddler, she was getting therapy through Perkins School for the Blind. If you have any questions, feel free.

ULTRAGOTHA
06-01-2014, 11:00 PM
Yes. Yes I did.













I'll be over here--> :chair

ULTRAGOTHA
06-01-2014, 11:19 PM
Jeseymour, is that a generational preference? Because my friend and her sisters all use albino to describe themselves.

Sharpshooting albino. Hmm. Er.

My friend, when she moved to the state she lives in now, called me to proudly announce she'd now failed the DMV eye test in three states. She rides her bicycle just fine, though.

Her elder sister, the first one with albinism in that family of six kids, learned to walk along the sidewalk by frequently feeling the ground. She couldn't tell a crack from a step (no depth perception) and her mother figured it was better she work out some way to tell the difference as a toddler. Seems to have worked for them.

Despite their vision problems, all three of them are very artistic--the whole family is. My friend does cartoons and illustrations and master-level costuming. Her younger sister weaves.

jeseymour
06-02-2014, 12:30 AM
Jeseymour, is that a generational preference? Because my friend and her sisters all use albino to describe themselves.

Sharpshooting albino. Hmm. Er.



I think it goes along with a softer approach to everything, what is it, a person who uses a wheelchair, rather than a person in a wheelchair? It just seems kinder, and it's what we were encouraged to use by all the people with Albinism and all the people who worked with them.

Was it Foul Play that had the Albino assassin? Plus Dan Brown, of course.

Maryn
06-02-2014, 12:54 AM
And The Matrix, although I forget which iteration.

Maryn, who didn't get into the franchise

A.P.M.
06-04-2014, 03:49 PM
I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I actually have a character with albinism in one of my fantasy YA series in progress. He's a major character so I don't want to get obvious details wrong.

Can people in the know talk a bit more about visual acuity in people with albinism? Is not having depth perception a fairly standard issue? Does every person with albinism have the same basic level of visual impairment, so to speak, or does it depend on the individual?

The character is a fairy, so if he would naturally have poor depth perception from albinism, I can't make him a precision flyer. I also have to decide if glasses should be invented in the fairy realm...

jeseymour
06-04-2014, 04:41 PM
Hi A.P.M.

Glasses don't help much. My daughter did wear glasses for a while, but the acuity was never 20/20, and she no longer needs them. Her acuity is 20/60ish now, and glasses will not help. She is unusual though, most people with Albinism do not have vision as good as hers. When a baby is in utero, the rods and cones in the eyes are forming, and they need pigment to do that. So a person without pigment has fewer or no rods and cones. I think. You could do a google search for the particulars. Glasses help with the shape of your eyeballs, I think? It has something to do with the way light is transferred from the front of the eye to the back. My daughter wore what were basically magnifying glasses to enlarge everything. She also used large print books for a while. She was very resistant to all of this once she hit middle school. You should also know that people with Albinism are very sensitive to sunlight in general, but are especially photophobic and should wear sunglasses. (And of course sunscreen!) My daughter had a large collection of hats as a youngster, and sunglasses of all sorts, and there is a company that sells UV block clothing. Maybe your fairy could wear cool Ray Bans. :D

As a cool side note, people with Albinism have eyes that transilluminate, so they are prone to red eye in photos. But if you carry the gene for Albinism, you will also tend to have eyes that transilluminate, even if you don't have any other symptoms.

People with Albinism do not have pink eyes. My daughter's eyes are blue. When she was born, her eyes were blue, and her hair, eyelashes and eyebrows were all pure white.

ULTRAGOTHA
06-04-2014, 04:52 PM
It varies widely from person to person. My friend has been involved in studies and reads up on things and has talked to me about that over the years. Jeseymour's daughter is the second person with albinism I've heard of who developed enough pigment in her retinas to see well enough to be able to drive.

My friend has tried to explain to me how she sees. She said it's like having a heavily scratched piece of glass she's seeing through. It obscures things far away. They aren't blurred just ... obscured. Close up or magnified she can see well enough to illustrate, make cartoons and reproduce wonderfully accurate costumes off of second generation camera copies of TV shows (back in the day when the only way we could affordably convert British PAL Tom Baker Doctor Who to US NTSC-playable video tape was to have someone in Britain aim a camera at the TV screen).

She sets her computer screen to large type and reads with a magnifying glass. She can see well enough to ride her bike to work and around town. She has more pigment than her two sisters but her hair is still barely off-white. Extremely platinum blonde.

We went on vacation in Scotland together several years ago and the sheep on the hillsides were white blobs on green to her. That said, she noticed them more often than I, the other passenger, did. She climbed ALL the steps to the top of the Scott Monument in Edinburgh and knew which of the specks on the ground were us and took a picture. I think that was by position of where she'd left us and color of what we were wearing.

WeaselFire
06-05-2014, 01:29 AM
Tattoo artists have trouble with people who have pigmentation issues (albinism or otherwise) and a good tattoo artist will need to adapt their palette, and often their style, to work well. But you can tattoo an orange peel if you want. The presence, or absence, of skin pigmentation makes no difference.

Jeff

ULTRAGOTHA
06-05-2014, 01:43 AM
For A.P.M.—

Glasses help with the shape of your eyeballs, I think?

Yes, optics distort light reaching the eyeball so when the eyeball distorts the light back the other way it is clear when being interpreted by the brain. The eyes of people with albinism don’t distort the light in a way optics can correct. Or at least not because of the lack of melanin. A person with albinism could also be near- or farsighted and wouldn’t that be fun! Not.


You should also know that people with Albinism are very sensitive to sunlight in general, but are especially photophobic and should wear sunglasses. (And of course sunscreen!) My daughter had a large collection of hats as a youngster, and sunglasses of all sorts, and there is a company that sells UV block clothing. Maybe your fairy could wear cool Ray Bans.

Ah, yes. My friend wears long sleeves and long pants in all weathers (and she lives in a hot and humid clime!) with large brimmed hats and sunglasses.

She can’t tan, she sunburns, hence all the long sleeves and sunblocking clothes. When they were young, their mother tried to guide them through all this; but if they were going to be stubborn the best way to learn was natural consequences. My friend decided she was, by golly, going to tan like all her friends and spent 20 minutes sunbathing in the back yard. BIG mistake. She said she was sore for weeks. Never did it again.

In a fantasy setting this may not matter; but one thing I learned early on is the difference in getting directions to places from someone who A) can’t drive and B) can’t see very far. Her sister was giving me directions on how to get to their house and instead of “after half a mile, turn right on Smith street at the gas station” it was “in five blocks turn right--there’s a purple poster on the telephone pole”. Try spotting the purple poster at sidewalk level from a moving car.

Something that is useful in a fantasy setting--if we agree to meet somewhere, I need to look for her, not both of us looking for each other. She could find me eventually based on my body shape and hair color but if she has no idea what I’m wearing, she’s got to get close up to anyone with my hair color that has a shape like mine. I can look across the crowd and spot the hat. Which reminds me we’re going to have to find each other next month when we go on vacation together again and I should remember to tell her what we’ll be wearing.

A.P.M.
06-05-2014, 05:24 AM
Awesome, thanks guys. This information is really helpful!

One thing I was considering was that fairies in my universe have better vision than humans--but compared to other fairies, the character would have some degree of visual impairment. The sensitivity to light will also play a role.