PDA

View Full Version : Market Research



RoccoMom
03-15-2006, 06:22 PM
Do agents do any type of market research before taking on a book? If a manuscript comes across their desk that they feel has potential, would they query some editors to see if there is interest prior to signing the author? Or do they go by gut instinct?

triceretops
03-17-2006, 08:53 AM
Toni, they usually have a pretty good idea of what editors currently want. And this comes with practice and networking with them. If they want to add a genre to their list, I'm certain that they do a lot of research beforehand so they know what they're getting into. When an agent has exhausted all of the choice, large houses, then I suppose they would do some book cracking to find the mid and smaller publishing houses. But alas, many agencies who've been in business for years, have tons of notes and tips on the smaller guys too. But they must forever be on the lookout for brand new houses that open up, so they can be properly investigated too. They work incredibly hard to stay on top of the market place. They know that one slip, can lead to another sale by another competitor.

Tri

Branwyn
03-17-2006, 07:30 PM
So then if an agent asks to read the full ms, he/she has a pretty good idea whether it'll sell?

I hope.

RoccoMom
03-17-2006, 08:33 PM
Sounds that way. and if they feel it's saleable but still needs some refining, they may say to the author, "We'll represent you if you clean up yada yada"


At least that's the way I interpret it.

Branwyn
03-17-2006, 10:11 PM
Thanks Toni...still have fingers and toes crossed;)

Jamesaritchie
03-19-2006, 06:41 AM
So then if an agent asks to read the full ms, he/she has a pretty good idea whether it'll sell?

I hope.

Not until after they read it. At best, they think it has a plot that will sell, but they won't have a clue whether or not the writting, and the way you've written the plot, will sell.

RoccoMom
03-19-2006, 06:31 PM
Not until after they read it. At best, they think it has a plot that will sell, but they won't have a clue whether or not the writting, and the way you've written the plot, will sell.


That sounds in keeping with the request I received for my full. He said the sample chapters got his interest, but he wouldn't know for sure unless he read the whole thing.

sportscribe
03-19-2006, 10:54 PM
I've confronted a smiliar situation. I landed a legit agent a few months ago, and he sent me a list of six major publishers that he submitted my non-fiction proposal.

It has been over a month and a half and he sent me two rejection letters from publishers. One editor said the market is too crowded with smiliar books. And the other, loved the writing and found it fascinating, but cited the same thing.

I must say it was incredible to read a letter from a prestigious editor who read my material. That's the advnatage of having an agent; they can present your material on the desk of the publishing elite.

I still have four more houses to go, and hopfully one editor will think there's still a market for my book.

Not sure if my agent researched the market before offering me representation; the subject and writing might have seduced him. Hopefully it will do the same to an editor.

This whole process is gut-grenching.

I thought finding an agent was the hard part. But it doesn't get any easier when you're forced to wait for an editor to respond.

Branwyn
03-22-2006, 11:19 PM
I've confronted a smiliar situation. I landed a legit agent a few months ago, and he sent me a list of six major publishers that he submitted my non-fiction proposal.

It has been over a month and a half and he sent me two rejection letters from publishers. One editor said the market is too crowded with smiliar books. And the other, loved the writing and found it fascinating, but cited the same thing.

I must say it was incredible to read a letter from a prestigious editor who read my material. That's the advnatage of having an agent; they can present your material on the desk of the publishing elite.

I still have four more houses to go, and hopfully one editor will think there's still a market for my book.

Not sure if my agent researched the market before offering me representation; the subject and writing might have seduced him. Hopefully it will do the same to an editor.

This whole process is gut-grenching.

I thought finding an agent was the hard part. But it doesn't get any easier when you're forced to wait for an editor to respond.

Oh boy!!

Good Luck!!!!!!