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mrabsolutefan
05-16-2014, 11:06 PM
Okay I am stuck again. :cry:

I want to know if, in elementary schools in the United States, grading is done by subject or is based on overall performance? I come from a country where we used to get graded by subjects so just want to be doubly sure. :)

Google searches don't seem to help me much with this one. :(

ap123
05-16-2014, 11:14 PM
It may vary by region, I know there's a difference btw public and private schools, but in NY most of the elementary schools give grades that are in line with the grading on state tests. 1-far from proficient, 2-nearing proficient, 3-proficient, 4-above proficiency.

Each subject is given a grade, further broken down by participation, different units, etc. Then the teachers usually write a personalized sentence or two.

mrabsolutefan
05-16-2014, 11:24 PM
It may vary by region, I know there's a difference btw public and private schools, but in NY most of the elementary schools give grades that are in line with the grading on state tests. 1-far from proficient, 2-nearing proficient, 3-proficient, 4-above proficiency.

Each subject is given a grade, further broken down by participation, different units, etc. Then the teachers usually write a personalized sentence or two.

Ah, a screenshot would have been more helpful but hey, thanks for your help. Guess my writer's block is over, for now. :)

ULTRAGOTHA
05-16-2014, 11:35 PM
When it comes to anything that starts “how do schools in the USA do X” the answer is *always* “it varies by school district”. Sometimes it even varies between schools in the same district.

So there’s just no way to answer a question unless we know what town and state and date the story is set in. Or what town and state and date the imaginary town in the story is based on.

mrabsolutefan
05-16-2014, 11:41 PM
When it comes to anything that starts “how do schools in the USA do X” the answer is *always* “it varies by school district”. Sometimes it even varies between schools in the same district.

So there’s just no way to answer a question unless we know what town and state and date the story is set in. Or what town and state and date the imaginary town in the story is based on.

Say, contemporary, NY NY?

ap123
05-16-2014, 11:57 PM
What I said upthread applies to contemporary NY, NY public elementary schools.

wendymarlowe
05-17-2014, 12:00 AM
Not exactly a screenshot, but here:

http://s6.photobucket.com/user/wendymarlowe/media/5a402a18-71ac-420e-ae74-43d7d6894fba_zps48ff3388.jpg.html

(This is for kindergarten, and not in New York, but the format is pretty similar to what you'd find elsewhere and this usually persists through 5th or 6th grade.)

StuckInMyHead
05-17-2014, 12:19 AM
Okay I am stuck again. :cry:

I want to know if, in elementary schools in the United States, grading is done by subject or is based on overall performance? I come from a country where we used to get graded by subjects (like, English -A; Social Studies: B; etc.) so just want to be doubly sure. :)

Google searches don't seem to help me much with this one. :(

As far as I know, it is and has always been by subject... ie. you get a grade for math, another for social studies, another for reading... I've never heard of a single grade for everything taught in the class.
But that said, when I grew up, the grading system was A, B, C, D, and F. A few things like citizenship (behaviour) were Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory)...
Now with my kids in elementary school the grading is 1, 2, 3, or 4, with 3 being average or meeting expectations.
I like the old letter grade system better.
And if you want to talk about the new "Common Core" system...

cornflake
05-17-2014, 06:53 AM
If it's not public school though, ones I'm familiar with grade on a 100-pt scale, per subject.

atthebeach
05-17-2014, 07:48 PM
Our kids are graded by subject, but numerical grades (eg. 85, 93). But since I am not in NY (or East coast), sounds like you want the info. from there. Just letting you know I agree with the others that is varies. Not only that, but for us 70 is the lowest passing grade (whereas where I grew up, 60 was the lowest passing grade).

Larry M
05-17-2014, 08:01 PM
I teach elementary school in Texas. Our grades are numeric by subject, with 70 minimum passing.

Grades within subject areas are usually divided into two components: formative (quizzes, in-class assignments, etc.) and summative (chapter tests, projects, etc.)

Summative grades are more heavily weighted - often 55-70% of the final grade.

Formative grades are usually 30-45% of the final grade.

Orianna2000
05-17-2014, 10:43 PM
When I was in elementary school, oh, about 25 years ago, in California, we were given a report card a few times a year, with a separate grade for each subject (math, science, literature, history, social studies, etc.) It was a letter grade, with A being the highest, C being average, and F being failure. There were also a couple of subjects in which we were given "satisfactory" or "unsatisfactory" grades, like mentioned above, for citizenship, and for something else, I don't recall what.

Tests were graded differently, with a percentile grade. I guess they added up the results of your various tests and that determined your overall grade.

Note that if you miss too many classes, you can be given an I, for incomplete. In Junior High, I was transferred from my original classes to a different set of classes, so I could be home by noon (trying to accommodate what we thought was a sun allergy). Only someone forgot to notify one of my previous teachers and at the end of the semester, I received a report card from her saying my grade was "I" and I needed to make up the work or risk failing. We cleared it up, eventually, but it was a frustration.

WriterTrek
05-18-2014, 12:19 AM
When I was in school in the USA we one grade per subject at this age range. Subjects included things such as English, History, Math, etc. I went to a small private school.

A: 93-100
B: 85-92
C: 77-84
D: 70-76
F: <70

Debbie V
05-20-2014, 02:59 AM
This should help explain the new system of numbers 1-4. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/25/education/25cards.html?pagewanted=all

kuwisdelu
05-20-2014, 03:37 AM
I went to a private school and we used the E (exemplary) / G (good) / S (satisfactory) / P (poor) / U (unsatisfactory) scale.

J.Emerson
05-20-2014, 03:53 AM
When I was in school in the USA we one grade per subject at this age range. Subjects included things such as English, History, Math, etc. I went to a small private school.

A: 93-100
B: 85-92
C: 77-84
D: 70-76
F: <70

My 11 y/o is in the 5th grade. She is graded on a subject by subject basis (for instance her classes now are math, English language arts, social studies, and science), on this scale mentioned above. There is also an annual standardized state exam (LEAP here, STAR in Cali) that you have to pass the major content areas on in order to move on to the next year. You can get straight a's, but if you fail LEAP you repeat the grade. My daughter has had the same format both in New Mexico and Louisiana, and I had the same grading scale where I grew up in SoCal (though we didn't do annual testing twenty years ago like they do now). These are all public schools.

mrabsolutefan
06-06-2014, 02:29 AM
Thank you all for your input. :D

jaksen
06-06-2014, 04:15 PM
When I was in school in the USA we one grade per subject at this age range. Subjects included things such as English, History, Math, etc. I went to a small private school.

A: 93-100
B: 85-92
C: 77-84
D: 70-76
F: <70

Wow, you had that system in the US? I went to school in MA and taught in the public schools for 35 years. Here is how ours went:

A: 90-100
B: 80-89
C: 70-79
D: 60-69 (D was considered unsatisfactory but passing.)
F: Under 60

But having spoken to some Canadian friends, they said they were happy when they 'passed' a class with a 50. I said, a 50! They said, yes, if you got half of anything right, you passed.

So once again, when in the US, or North America, there are going to be a lot of diff. standards.

And as for our elementary grades, we received E, S and N up to Grade 2. We were graded in subjects and things like Conduct and Attitude. From Grade 3 on, we received A, B, C, D and U. At 7th grade the U became an F. This is pretty much how the schools in my part of the state did things as I had friends who taught in nearby towns and in cities, like Worcester and Boston. Private schools graded the same way.

Funny how people get together and decide these things. I would imagine many of these standards date back a 100 years or more.

LJD
06-06-2014, 05:21 PM
But having spoken to some Canadian friends, they said they were happy when they 'passed' a class with a 50. I said, a 50! They said, yes, if you got half of anything right, you passed.

Haha, yeah. Not sure if this is true everywhere in Canada, but certainly where I grew up:

A+: 90-100
A: 80-89
B: 70-79
C: 60-69
D: 50-59
F: <50

Though there's now this weird Level 1-4 grading system, too.

Russian
06-07-2014, 05:34 AM
Beyond grading systems, it's worth knowing that state standardized testing has changed the nature of teaching. Teachers are often judged and compensated based on overall student performance on standardized tests. Consequently, curriculum has shifted towards what's known as "teach to test" where the goal is to ensure high grades on standardized tests.

This can result in a less comprehensive education. In addition, most educators are expected to create their own lesson plans. For inexperienced teachers, it's tempting to use standardized tests as a blueprint for their lesson plans.

mrabsolutefan
06-07-2014, 06:20 AM
Thank you for your input. Can you please elaborate this part?


This can result in a less comprehensive education.

How?

Thanks. :D

Russian
06-07-2014, 06:33 AM
Think of it this way. You're teaching English. You have to cover grammar, vocabulary, reading comprehension and writing. You know the following about the standardized test:
1. Types of grammatical examples tested.
2. The words and corresponding synonyms used.
3. Basic format of reading comprehension examples.
4. The type of writing sample required.

Grammar and reading comprehension will be fairly broad, so teachers won't sacrifice much here. Vocabulary will be substantially affected. I distinctly remember being drilled week-after-week on a specific set of words/synonyms which would appear on the standardized test. Writing will be extremely skewed towards the type tested: creative, persuasive or compare/contrast. Once again, I remember being tested on compare/contrast far more than creative or persuasive writing because that's what would appear on the standardized test.

One of my good friends teaches high school in a major US city. Teach-to-test is a hotly debated topic among educators. In recent years, educators at several lower performing school districts have been exposed for filling in correct answers on the unfilled out portions of student's Scantron forms. They were motivated by performance ratings and bonuses. They were exposed because of the disparity between correct answer percentages for earlier vs later test questions as well as the uniformity of answers for all students on later questions.