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Orianna2000
05-07-2014, 05:46 PM
How well-known is Tylenol in the UK? If an American patient asks for some Tylenol in a London hospital, will the doctor know what she's talking about immediately? Or might there be a moment of confusion before she figures out the patient means paracetamol?

Mr Flibble
05-07-2014, 05:52 PM
I would vaguely know it's some sort of painkiller (and only because I read Stephen King a lot when I was younger!) that's about it. I suspect a doctor might have an idea though. Although why you'd ask for paracetamol in a hospital? Anyway, they'd probably have a clue, but would almost certainly clarify, just to be sure.

Orianna2000
05-07-2014, 06:02 PM
Clarifying works. It's pretty much how I wrote it.

As for why she would ask for Tylenol, the MC has just had stitches, so she's in some pain. She's not the sort of person who would ask for any sort of narcotic, so she just asks for Tylenol.

Thank you!

Telergic
05-07-2014, 06:05 PM
Is paracetamol even offered as a choice in hospitals anymore? From what I read it's more dangerous than other common pain relievers, and no more effective. Aren't aspirin and ibuprofen much more popular choices? I suppose there may be conditions which rule out those last two but not paracetamol.

Wilde_at_heart
05-07-2014, 06:06 PM
Codeine is the narcotic, not paracetamol. Tylenol can be both, or just the latter. ETA: However it's a brand name, so in the UK it's probably called something else.

Mr Flibble
05-07-2014, 06:06 PM
Oh right!

They'd offer her painkillers as a matter of course anyway, or ask if she needs any if its likely she will (depends on what's stitched and why I suspect. If it's minor they'll just suggest she takes some when she gets home). Of course, then she could say "Tylenol" :D

ETA:
Aren't aspirin and ibuprofen much more popular choices? Not sure, but my doctor always reccs paracetamol, interspersed with ibuprofen if necessary.

waylander
05-07-2014, 06:10 PM
Is paracetamol even offered as a choice in hospitals anymore? From what I read it's more dangerous than other common pain relievers, and no more effective. Aren't aspirin and ibuprofen much more popular choices? I suppose there may be conditions which rule out those last two but not paracetamol.

Yes it is. I was prescribed it recently

Depends on where the prescribing doctor is from. A significant proportion of our hospitals doctors, particularly in A&E, did not train in the UK. A request for Tylenol may well be met with a blank look.

Mr Flibble
05-07-2014, 06:15 PM
Here (http://www.patient.co.uk/health/painkillers) we are.


Aspirin is also an NSAID but nowadays it is mainly used (in low doses) to help to keep the blood from clotting.

and

Paracetamol is normally prescribed if your pain is not too serious and you do not have inflammation.
And from the NHS (http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Pain/Pages/Whichpainkiller.aspx):


Aspirin produces the same type of side effects as other NSAIDs, but is not as effective as a painkiller, which means it's not usually prescribed for pain. It is dangerous for children under 12.

Orianna2000
05-07-2014, 06:32 PM
I'm usually told to take Tylenol or ibuprofen when I have dental work done, but I'm allergic to Tylenol and my stomach won't tolerate aspirin or ibuprofen.

I will probably have the doctor offer something stronger when she asks for Tylenol, just because she was cut up pretty bad. Thirty stitches total, on the upper arm and neck.

mirandashell
05-07-2014, 06:38 PM
You can get paracetamol and codiene here, called Co-codamol. If she is ok to take codeine. You only get enough for 3 days though as you shouldn't take codeine for any longer. You will risk addiction if you do.

Christabelle
05-07-2014, 07:15 PM
You can get paracetamol and codiene here, called Co-codamol. If she is ok to take codeine. You only get enough for 3 days though as you shouldn't take codeine for any longer. You will risk addiction if you do.
That is usually called "Tylenol 3" here in the States.

When I was pregnant, I was advised to take Tylenol for pain rather than NSAIDs or aspirin. My 2 month old received Tylenol in the hospital after an outpatient procedure yesterday. AFAIK, it's also the go-to OTC pain reliever for people with most bleeding disorders.

Albedo
05-07-2014, 07:24 PM
Paracetamol (UK/Commonwealth), or acetaminophen (US),* is the most common analgesic in the world. It's also the safest, if you don't have a pre-existing liver condition, and you take it at a safe dose (for an adult, generally <4 g/day). In overdose, it becomes markedly hepatotoxic. It would be widely available at any hospital.

I know what Tylenol is from exposure to American media. Most doctors would be aware that acetaminophen and paracetamol are the same drug, but might not be familiar with Tylenol. The most common brand in the UK and Australia is Panadol.



*Both are short for para-acetylaminophenol.

skylark
05-07-2014, 08:02 PM
I don't think the doctor will have a clue what she's talking about unless she's encountered it in fiction or maybe on a trip to the States. It's a brand name and not one we have in the UK.

She might know what it is - I do solely because I encountered it reading fanfic.

The equivalent term in the UK is paracetamol - it's relatively unusual as an OTC medication in that there isn't really a brand name which people ask for.

Laina1312
05-08-2014, 03:41 AM
Wikipedia says they're the same thing, which I did not know. I buy acetiminiphen that's just store-brand and call it Tylenol for simplicity. Your character could just clafify with "acetaminiphin" if there's confusion? I'm sure doctors would know the drug name itself.

Or you could give her a narcotic allergy/sensitivity and just have her ask for something mild. My mom can't take codeine (she got it for a bad tooth once) because it makes her puke really badly. And my father apparently was allergic I'd be leary of taking of it (never needed a painkiller, although the doctor asked me if I did for my last ear infection LOL). And the hospital once overdosed my aunt on morphine when she had a migraine so she can't take that. Lots of reasons not to take the big stuff.

There's another... Vicodon, I think it is, comes with Tylenol in it, I've heard? Which is actually part of why it's hard on the liver. Like the tylenol long-term is harder on your liver and stomach and stuff than the Vicodon. Isn't that weird?

...I got rambly, sorry XD

Orianna2000
05-08-2014, 03:54 AM
Yes, Vicodin has Tylenol in it. It can be hard on your liver if you're taking it long-term, like some with chronic pain do.

So, I had the doctor clarify, "Paracetamol?" And then she offers her something a little stronger instead. Of course, they get interrupted, so my poor MC has to wait to get her pain meds.

skylark
05-08-2014, 11:28 AM
Yes, Vicodin has Tylenol in it. It can be hard on your liver if you're taking it long-term, like some with chronic pain do.

So, I had the doctor clarify, "Paracetamol?" And then she offers her something a little stronger instead. Of course, they get interrupted, so my poor MC has to wait to get her pain meds.

My experience in UK hospitals is that they talk about "pain relief". Saves confusion when a patient says they don't want paracetamol and it turns out that they're in a lot of pain but paracetamol makes them throw up.

So I think the doctor would establish "patient needs pain relief" before discussing specific drugs.

waylander
05-08-2014, 12:59 PM
Doctor should (and usually do) ask if you are allergic to any drugs before they start prescribing.

Orianna2000
05-08-2014, 06:46 PM
Ooh, good point about drug allergies! I have a list in my wallet of all the medications I'm allergic to. When I pull it out, the doctors are always impressed that I'm so organized, but dismayed at how long the list of allergies is.

WeaselFire
05-08-2014, 09:22 PM
How well-known is Tylenol in the UK?
Tylenol is a brand name and primarily US/North American. But any hospital doctor/nurse/attendant should know or be able to quickly figure it out.

On the flip side, Tylenol is over the counter and would rarely be an issue. Asking for aspirin might get you Tylenol or any other mild pain reliever that's available.

Jeff

melindamusil
05-08-2014, 09:31 PM
Doctor should (and usually do) ask if you are allergic to any drugs before they start prescribing.

Way back when I was in junior high, I volunteered at a hospital and "worked" in the ER. This was nearly 20 years ago, but if you came into the hospital with a non-critical injury, you would first see a triage nurse who would assess your injury and take your medical history, including drug allergies. That was then put into your chart.

Stitches would probably fall under this umbrella of non-critical injuries.

Having said that, it would not surprise me if the doctor checked her chart and then asked her again if she had any drug allergies before he pulls out his prescription pad. Better safe than sorry.

Orianna2000
05-08-2014, 10:15 PM
Well, it's a bit more complicated than a woman walking into an ER for stitches. For one thing, it's not a hospital, it's an infirmary in a secret base. And when the MC is found, she's unconscious from blood loss, so she can't give a medical history. (I simplified the original question, so I wouldn't confuse anyone with the details of the situation. When you're dealing with aliens and secret organizations, it gets complicated real fast. . . .) :)

girlyswot
05-12-2014, 04:52 PM
I lived in the US for 2 years and I still can never remember whether tylenol is ibuprofen or paracetamol. It's ALWAYS called paracetamol here. And although, as someone mentioned, there are branded versions here such as Panadol, you'd be unlikely to ask for it by brand.