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dante-x
03-13-2006, 10:53 PM
Alright, here's another noob question. Is "After all" a prepositional phrase? (not sure on the terminology). I am trying to figure out if it is in an of itself a dependant clause.

That is, can I say:

"She realized that she didn't know him, after all."

or is it correct to say...

"She realized that she didn't know him, after all was said and done."

reph
03-13-2006, 11:37 PM
"After all" is correct by itself. You don't have to expand it. You don't need a comma in front of it.

dante-x
03-13-2006, 11:46 PM
Thanks Reph :)

Jamesaritchie
03-14-2006, 03:27 AM
Alright, here's another noob question. Is "After all" a prepositional phrase? (not sure on the terminology). I am trying to figure out if it is in an of itself a dependant clause.

That is, can I say:

"She realized that she didn't know him, after all."

or is it correct to say...

"She realized that she didn't know him, after all was said and done."

The way you use "after all" does not take a comma, but "after all" can also be used as an introductory phrase that does require a comma.

reph
03-14-2006, 04:01 AM
You don't need a comma in front of it.


The way you use "after all" does not take a comma, but "after all" can also be used as an introductory phrase that does require a comma.
In that case, the comma goes after the phrase.

If you plop "after all" into the middle of a sentence, it may need a comma on each end: "Carla decided to take a break no matter what the foreman said. She'd come in at six a.m. and worked until noon, after all, despite her headache." Whether you need commas depends on how you use "after all" what it modifies.

Sage
03-14-2006, 07:08 AM
Is "afterall" a real word, or have I just seen it wrong before, & somehow integrated it into the way I want to write it (but don't 'cuz Word says it's wrong).

Maryn
03-14-2006, 07:37 AM
Lots of words that frequently appear together eventually become joined, first with a hyphen, then without it in unknowing error, taken up in the closed form by edgy publications, finally accepted by the mainstream. (Examples include notebook, motorcycle, tomorrow, dustmop, with coffeemaker and countertop moving from hyphenated to closed more recently.)

So far, "after all" is still two words--to me. But I'm majorly un-edgy.

Maryn, an open book

reph
03-14-2006, 09:16 AM
"After all" is still two words, like please indulge me while I exercise the ax-sharpening equipment "a lot" and "more so."

Tish Davidson
03-14-2006, 11:40 AM
"After all" is still two words, like please indulge me while I exercise the ax-sharpening equipment "a lot" and "more so."

And for those of us who are traditionalists, "all right."

Phouka
03-15-2006, 08:05 AM
And for those of us who are traditionalists, "all right."

Am I really a traditionalist for still writing 'all right'? I was sticking to the idea that it was the only correct version and that 'alright' was an abomination.

reph
03-15-2006, 09:16 AM
"Alright" is an abomination.

jst5150
03-15-2006, 07:24 PM
"After all" is the Americanized and shortened version of the phrase "After all has been said and done ..." (Reference unavailable because I'm at work and have it at home. Regrets). So, if you use it, stick it on the front of whatever construct you build.

rekirts
03-15-2006, 10:02 PM
"Alright" is an abomination.Is not. :tongue

reph
03-15-2006, 10:32 PM
"After all" is the Americanized and shortened version of the phrase "After all has been said and done ..."... So, if you use it, stick it on the front of whatever construct you build.
Why does being an Americanized and shortened version mean it should go on the front?

jst5150
03-15-2006, 10:44 PM
Because ... it ... felt ... real good -- at the time -- to say that.

Yeah. I must have been finishing the last sips of coffee when I put that last part in there. Whoopsie daisy.