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Christine N.
03-13-2006, 05:59 PM
Or else it wouldn't be on the instructions...

On a bar of Dial soap: "Directions: Use like regular soap."
(and that would be how??...)

On some Swanson frozen dinners: "Serving suggestion: Defrost."
(but, it's "just" a suggestion.) . LOL

On Tesco's Tiramisu dessert (printed on bottom): "Do not turn upside down."
(well...duh, a bit late, huh!) ... LOL

On Marks & Spencer Bread Pudding: "Product will be hot after
heating."
(...and you thought????...) .. LOL

On packaging for a Rowenta iron: "Do not iron clothes on
body."
(but wouldn't this save me more time?) .lmfao

On Boot's Children Cough Medicine:"Do not drive a car or
operate machinery after taking this medication."
(We could do a lot to reduce the rate of construction accidents if we could just get those 5-year-olds with head-colds off those forklifts.)

On Nytol Sleep Aid: "Warning: May cause drowsiness."
(and... I'm taking this because???....)

On most brands of Christmas lights: "For indoor or outdoor use
only."
(as opposed to...what?)

On Sunsbury's peanuts: "Warning: contains nuts."
(talk about a news flash) lol

On an American Airlines packet of nuts: "Instructions: Open packet, eat nuts."
(Step 3: maybe, uh...fly Delta?) LOL

On a Swedish chainsaw:"Do not attempt to stop chain with your
hands or genitals."
(..was there a lot of this happening somewhere?)

JoeEkaitis
03-13-2006, 06:05 PM
And on every Preparation H product:

FOR EXTERNAL USE ONLY

"I ate a whole tube of this stuff and it didn't stop the burning and itching at all, Doc!"

Pennywise
03-13-2006, 06:08 PM
Ha Ha very funny.

I think most of these warnings are to protect the company from lawsuits though. I mean, in todays society, people will sue anyone for anything and usually get away with it to!! :rant:

I remember a woman in America successfully sueing McDonalds because her coffee was hot!!

Christine N.
03-13-2006, 06:40 PM
Yes, and now all the coffee cups say "Caution: Contents are HOT!"

I work for a marketing company, and this is what they say - if it sounds stupid, but is listed on the directions, someone somewhere tried it.

stormie
03-13-2006, 06:48 PM
Fools are born every minute. Thanks for the laugh, Christine! That--and coffee--just made my morning.

dahmnait
03-13-2006, 07:04 PM
On Sunsbury's peanuts: "Warning: contains nuts."
(talk about a news flash) lolOk, this is from memory, but I got such a kick reading it the other day.

On a can of mixed nuts: "may be processed on equipment that also processes nuts" (ya think?)

Maryn
03-13-2006, 07:12 PM
Ha Ha very funny.

I think most of these warnings are to protect the company from lawsuits though. I mean, in todays society, people will sue anyone for anything and usually get away with it to!! :rant:

I remember a woman in America successfully sueing McDonalds because her coffee was hot!!The McDonald's case comes up so often, usually as an example of a silly, frivolous lawsuit, that I saved an article about it. It's not my work, so I won't post it here, but I'll summarize.

The woman who was burned when she spilled her coffee on her lap spent a week in the hospital with second- and third-degree (the most serious) burns to her genitalia and buttocks. After three weeks recuperation at home, she returned to the hospital for extensive skin grafts. Her weight had dropped to 83 pounds. Her clitoris was burned off. Her vaginal opening and anus were badly burned, and her anus healed with strictures which made defecation painful.

The woman wrote to ask McDonaldís to do two things: keep their coffee cooler and pay her medical expenses. McDonald's offered her less than half her expenses, no apology, and no reduction in temperature on their coffee.

Most people don't realize ithe serious injury this woman received--and that McDonald's had over 700 burn complaints over a ten-year period and had decided not to reduce the heat settings on all its coffee equipment because paying off each burn victim was cheaper. That's where punitive damages come in.

Maryn, who would miss her genitalia if Mickey D's burned them off :cry:

Christine N.
03-13-2006, 07:18 PM
Yes, I would be mad about that too... Then again, I probably wouldn't travel with HOT coffee in my lap either. I think (though I may be wrong) that she had it in her lap? Or was it that she was just holding it and the lid wasn't on tight? Hey, if you're driving you shouldn't be drinking - not even coffee. Stop first.

AdamH
03-13-2006, 07:54 PM
At first, I thought that the Macdonald's suit was frivolous until I found out all the details like Maryn did. But how's this as a frivolous lawsuit:

Kelloggs, the friendly makers of Frosted Flakes, are suing Exxon (http://www.uslaw.com/library/article/carel2EmpContracts.html?area_id=43)over the use of a tiger mascot saying that both companies having a tiger as a mascot causes confusion to consumers.

It's a crazy crazy world out there....the only people that get hurt in a case like this is poor poor Tony the Tiger and Exxon's Tiger...and the children...it hurts the children too. *sniff*

ChaosTitan
03-13-2006, 08:10 PM
Christine is right, she had the coffee cup in her lap, between her legs. Let's all say it together: cupholders are our friends. :Headbang:

To add to the list of stupid labels, I once bought a curling iron (I forget the brand). It came with a little slip of paper that said "Do Not Use on Eyes." :Wha:

rtilryarms
03-13-2006, 09:42 PM
//On a bar of Dial soap: "Directions: Use like regular soap."
(and that would be how??...)//

Easy, wash your face first and your bottom last- just like the person before you.


//On some Swanson frozen dinners: "Serving suggestion: Defrost."//

The same instructions are on my Wife!


//On Tesco's Tiramisu dessert (printed on bottom): "Do not turn upside down."//

The ultimate warning. They cover their butt while they cover your lap.

//On Marks & Spencer Bread Pudding: "Product will be hot after
heating."//

Darned honeymoons! Donít worry, it cools off (see defrost instructions above)

//On packaging for a Rowenta iron: "Do not iron clothes on
body."//

Except above the shins. Thatís the iron knee of the whole thing.


//On Nytol Sleep Aid: "Warning: May cause drowsiness."//

Why donít they call it drowsy aid?

//On most brands of Christmas lights: "For indoor or outdoor use
only."//

LOL!

//On a Swedish chainsaw:"Do not attempt to stop chain with your
hands or genitals."//

Those crazy Swedes think that they can do anything better than the rest of the world. It took me 2 times to stop my Chinese-made chainsaw.

Christine N.
03-13-2006, 09:43 PM
That's what I thought, which is why I think everyone thought the lawsuit was frivolous. If you're gonna travel with coffee in your lap, expect to get burned. Come on, not that hard to understand. It was an avoidable incident.

Christine N.
03-13-2006, 09:44 PM
To add to the list of stupid labels, I once bought a curling iron (I forget the brand). It came with a little slip of paper that said "Do Not Use on Eyes." :Wha:


I've seen hairdryers that say "Do not use in tub." And vaccuum cleaners that say "Do not use to vaccuum hanging drapes."


Silly Rabbits.

Chacounne
03-13-2006, 09:56 PM
About the coffee lawsuit,

I believe her son or grandson was driving and had pulled over and parked when they got their order, and she had the cup between her legs to steady it while she was eating or adjusting her food. If that is so, and please correct me if I am misremembering, why was what she did wrong? Burns are one thing, in my opinion, third degree burns that require skin grafting is another.

Just my two cents,
Chac

Celia Cyanide
03-13-2006, 09:57 PM
Christine is right, she had the coffee cup in her lap, between her legs. Let's all say it together: cupholders are our friends. :Headbang:


Actually, another little known fact about the lawsuit was that she was sitting in a parked car at the time the coffee spilled, and she was in the passenger seat.

If you drive with a cup between your legs, it's obviously going to spill. But even if someone should expect this to happen, they should NOT expect to be in the hospital for 3 weeks with 3rd degree burns. If the coffee gave her 3rd degree burns, it was too hot to drink. If it was too hot to drink, it should not be handed to a customer. It's unsafe.

I don't know the exact temperature, but McDonald's keeps their coffee heated at temperatures much higher than is the norm for restaurants. They do not want their coffee to cool off, and then have to make more, so they serve it at temperatures high enough to give people 3rd degree burns.

Lastly, if you receive 3rd degree burns because of the actions of a major corporation, you have every right to expect them to pay your hospital bill. McDonald's makes enough money to do that for a little old lady, and they didn't.

Maryn
03-13-2006, 10:20 PM
Christine is right, she had the coffee cup in her lap, between her legs. Let's all say it together: cupholders are our friends. The car was parked. It was a Ford Probe with a slanted dashboard and no cup holders. The injured woman had asked that the driver pull into a parking space so she could add cream and sugar without spilling.

Maryn, big facts fan

Prosthetic Foreheads
03-13-2006, 10:20 PM
If it was too hot to drink, it should not be handed to a customer. It's unsafe.




In my experience, all coffee is WAY too hot to drink immediately after brewing. I don't know, maybe McDonald's heats their coffee even more after brewing and if that's the case, that's different. But you can't say, "If it's too hot to drink it shouldn't be handed to a customer."

All coffee drinkers I know want their coffee as fresh as possible. They would love to watch the last drip of hot water (and water used for brewing is SCALDING) right as their coffee is prepared. Like i said, it's different if they heat it more after brewing, but in every restaurant I have worked, the fresh brewed coffee is going to cause serious burns if enough of it is spilled on you, and that's how the customers want it. They want to have blow on it before they drink it. If they can drink it immediately when you serve it, they'll complain that it's not fresh enough.

Anya Smith
03-13-2006, 10:38 PM
Somebody did it somewhere

Christine, thanks for the laugh. It's hard to believe there are so many stupid people in the world to do those things.

Christine N.
03-13-2006, 10:40 PM
Oh, ok, I thought she was driving. Yes, coffee shouldn't be that hot, I agree, but I would never stick a cup of hot coffee between my legs in a moving vehicle. I'd put it between by feet first. Hey, at least if the coffee spilled there I could move my feet pretty quick.

That's just asking for trouble. If everything else was in a bag, food on the floor, coffee in hands or on the floor. I'm not saying McD's shouldn't have paid her bills, I'm saying that people should use their heads too.

Prosthetic Foreheads
03-13-2006, 11:16 PM
And coffee should be served too hot to drink.

trumancoyote
03-13-2006, 11:47 PM
Her clitoris was burned off.

Honey bunches of Christ, that's awful >.<

But like, didn't that weird skin-flappy Star Trek door-like hood thing protect it?

... I know very little about female genitalia, if it's not obvious.

Stew21
03-13-2006, 11:52 PM
Honey bunches of Christ, that's awful >.<

But like, didn't that weird skin-flappy Star Trek door-like hood thing protect it?

... I know very little about female genitalia, if it's not obvious.

Oh my Lord! I can't stop laughing at this Tru....
(no the burn isnt funny, his question wording is)

No that "skin flappy Hood" is not enough to protect her clit from anything but overstimulation...

Trish - who can't believe she just said that!

Carole
03-13-2006, 11:56 PM
That's what I thought, which is why I think everyone thought the lawsuit was frivolous. If you're gonna travel with coffee in your lap, expect to get burned. Come on, not that hard to understand. It was an avoidable incident.When this case came up in one of my paralegal classes, the book described that the cup was styrofoam and that the coffee melted through the cup. Not unavoidable.

Celia Cyanide
03-14-2006, 12:08 AM
In my experience, all coffee is WAY too hot to drink immediately after brewing. I don't know, maybe McDonald's heats their coffee even more after brewing and if that's the case, that's different. But you can't say, "If it's too hot to drink it shouldn't be handed to a customer."

All coffee drinkers I know want their coffee as fresh as possible. They would love to watch the last drip of hot water (and water used for brewing is SCALDING) right as their coffee is prepared. Like i said, it's different if they heat it more after brewing, but in every restaurant I have worked, the fresh brewed coffee is going to cause serious burns if enough of it is spilled on you, and that's how the customers want it. They want to have blow on it before they drink it. If they can drink it immediately when you serve it, they'll complain that it's not fresh enough.

Why should coffee be served hot enough to cause 3rd degree burns? Do most restaurants have over 700 burn victims from their coffee? The temperature of McDonald's coffee is much higher than that of other restaurants.

And the point is, McDonald's coffee is NOT fresh. They keep it that hot so that it can sit there all day, and they don't have to toss it out and make more.

Maybe this incident could have been avoided if she had not spilled it, but she was a little old lady with a hospital bill. Would it have killed McDonald's to pay it? No. She wasn't try to cash in, just get her billed paid.

Truman, PM me and I'll explain everything! :)

kikazaru
03-14-2006, 12:10 AM
I doubt that anyone's personal coffee makers makes coffee hot enough to cause 3rd degree burns. Perking it on the stove would do so because it is heated to boiling and sustained for several minutes, but when it runs thru an electric drip coffee maker it doesn't reach boiling temperature, and these are what restaurant makers usually do. Combine the fact that the coffee was hot enough to severely burn someone to that extent, and then placed in a flimsy paper cup really should make them liable for damages.

That poor woman.

Carole
03-14-2006, 12:19 AM
and then placed in a flimsy paper cup really should make them liable for damages.

That poor woman.
Scroll up - my teacher said that it was a styrofoam cup and the coffee melted through it.

kikazaru
03-14-2006, 12:41 AM
Egads! That's even worse!

I remember once getting some coffee at a self pour station and the entire paper cup crumpled when I attempted to put the lid on. I'd been working out, but not to that extent. I was just happy that the coffee was your average restaurant temp so I didn't sustain any lasting injuries to my hand - but it sure hurt anyway.

rtilryarms
03-14-2006, 12:44 AM
McFact #1: For years McDonald's knew that their 1850 coffee was served at least 200 hotter than at other restaurants. They insisted on it, and even though more than 700 other people had made claims for scalding coffee burns in the previous ten years, McDonald's never consulted a burn expert and didn't lower the temperature.

McFact #2: 79-year old Stella Liebeck was not driving in a car when she was injured. In fact, she was not driving at all. She had gone with her grandson, Chris, to take her son, Jim, to the airport. On the way home, Chris pulled into a McDonald's drive-thru for breakfast. He parked the car so she could add cream and sugar to her coffee. Here's what happened next: Because the car had no cup holders and a slanted dash, Stella testified that she put the cup between her knees and removed the lid. As she did so, the slick styrofoam cup flipped backwards, dumping the scalding liquid into her lap and saturated the cotton sweatsuit which she was wearing. Her grandson, Chris, jumped out to help but the near boiling coffee was already searing her skin. By the time Chris was able to bring his grandmother to the emergency room, she had third degree burns across her groin, thighs, genitalia and buttocks. Stella Liebeck was badly wounded. She says all she remembers is the pain.

McFact #3: Stella spent 7 days in the hospital. She then spent another 3 weeks confined to her home where her daughter travelled to take care of her. After that, she required another hospital stay for skin grafts. She went from 113 to 83 pounds and for a time her family doubted if she would survive.

McFact #4: Initially, Stella's family only asked McDonald's for her out-of-pocket expenses, about $2,000 plus her daughter's lost wages. McDonald's offered only $800.

McFact #5: A McDonald's Quality Control manager testified that McDonald's knew of the risk of dangerously hot coffee and had no plans to either turn down the heat or warn their customers, even though most customers wouldn't be aware of the scalding danger.

McFact #6: Another McDonald's corporate witness testified that they had received 700 complaints prior to this accident.

McFact #7: Only after McDonald's refused to raise its offer above $800, Stella's lawyer filed suit. He asked for $100,000 in compensatory damages including her pain and suffering and triple punitive damages to send a message to McDonald's that their coffee was dangerously hot.

McFact #8: A month later, the judge reduced the jury's punitive award of $2.7 million to only $640,000 reasoning that this amount was approximately 3 times the compensatory damages. He said the case "was not a runaway, I was there," and that it was "appropriate to punish and deter" McDonald's corporate coffee policy.

McFact #9: McDonald's still has not gotten the lesson and lowered the temperature of its coffee. A report in Liability Week, September 29, 1997, states that after Stella Liebeck burned herself in this case a 73-year old woman suffered first and second degree burns when a cup of McDonald's coffee spilled on her lap. This report indicated that McDonald's still keeps its coffee at 1800, still 200 hotter than other restaurants.

What does this mean for you the consumer? Third degree burns occur at 1850 in just 2 - 5 seconds. They can require skin grafting and other expensive medical treatments that can exceed tens of thousands of dollars and inflict severe prolonged pain and permanent disability.
Be aware of the potential danger when at home or elsewhere. Make sure that children don't have access to scalding liquids. Make sure that you know all the facts before buying into the sensational stories permeating our culture. Don't let fantasy based t.v. shows and insurance company propaganda rob you of your rights to use our civil justice system to ensure your family's safety

By O'Brien, Shafner, Stuart, Kelly & Morris, P.C.

rtilryarms
03-14-2006, 12:46 AM
i think that 1850 is 185 degrees and it is 20 degrees hotter. I know that max temp at my restaurant inside American Express was 165 deg.

The font probably got messed up.

Cheryll
03-14-2006, 12:48 AM
On a Swedish chainsaw:"Do not attempt to stop chain with your hands or genitals." (..was there a lot of this happening somewhere?)


Now THAT made my day! :) You gotta watch those Swedes and their chain saws! Thanks for the laugh.

Cheryll

Cheryll
03-14-2006, 12:51 AM
To add to the list of stupid labels, I once bought a curling iron (I forget the brand). It came with a little slip of paper that said "Do Not Use on Eyes." :Wha:


But... but... they make my eyelashes look so long and lush!!!

Cheryll

Christine N.
03-14-2006, 01:10 AM
When this case came up in one of my paralegal classes, the book described that the cup was styrofoam and that the coffee melted through the cup. Not unavoidable.


Wow, that's hot. I thought the lid had come off, and that was the problem - the worker hadn't put the lid on correctly. Which is their fault of course.

Celia Cyanide
03-14-2006, 01:49 AM
Wow, that's hot. I thought the lid had come off, and that was the problem - the worker hadn't put the lid on correctly. Which is their fault of course.

Regardless of how it happened, even if the woman was being truly careless, she did not deserve to be served coffee hot enough to give her third degree burns, without being warned.

trumancoyote
03-14-2006, 01:54 AM
Back on the subject of her clitoris... luckily she was 73 and was pretty much out-of-service in terms of boot-knockery.

Running!

Maryn
03-14-2006, 02:21 AM
You better run, boy, before I smack you with my cane!

I'm not 73 yet, but I fully anticipate occasional to frequent use of that portion of my anatomy, same as always. All present indicators suggest some truth to that snow-on-the-roof-fire-in-the-furnace saying!

Maryn, old-timer (speak directly into the ear trumpet, boy!)

trumancoyote
03-14-2006, 02:28 AM
I'd prefer to raspberry into your furnace trumpet, granny :)

Christine N.
03-14-2006, 04:41 AM
Regardless of how it happened, even if the woman was being truly careless, she did not deserve to be served coffee hot enough to give her third degree burns, without being warned.

This is true, I think I agreed with you.

rtilryarms
03-14-2006, 05:20 AM
There is confusion between fault and negligence. In negligence it doesn't matter whose fault it is. It is who is negligent. The firm had 700 complaints. It is a scientific fact that severe scalding occurs at 185 deg F. Check your water heater and it will be 145 or less. Plumbers install it and set it at 125, 10 degrees below factory setting. (might have changed in the 20 years since i plumbered.)
The restaurant is in the business of serving coffe, for one. It is their business to understand safety and industrial standards.

So it is easy to see that the lady is at fault for spilling the coffee on herself. But the resaurant was negligent in allowing a product to be dangerous.
It is fortunate that she was NOT driving. Can you imagine the same scenario if she was?

This was a good verdict. I think the judge was wrong to reduce the payout. McDonalds responded by not changing the temperature below scalding. The judge should have reinstated the punitives immediately. 180 still scalds.

Jcomp
03-14-2006, 05:37 AM
There is confusion between fault and negligence. In negligence it doesn't matter whose fault it is. It is who is negligent. The firm had 700 complaints. It is a scientific fact that severe scalding occurs at 185 deg F. Check your water heater and it will be 145 or less. Plumbers install it and set it at 125, 10 degrees below factory setting. (might have changed in the 20 years since i plumbered.)
The restaurant is in the business of serving coffe, for one. It is their business to understand safety and industrial standards.

So it is easy to see that the lady is at fault for spilling the coffee on herself. But the resaurant was negligent in allowing a product to be dangerous.
It is fortunate that she was NOT driving. Can you imagine the same scenario if she was?

This was a good verdict. I think the judge was wrong to reduce the payout. McDonalds responded by not changing the temperature below scalding. The judge should have reinstated the punitives immediately. 180 still scalds.

Agreed. I think now McDonald's has a "caution, coffee is very hot" label on their coffe cups. Although that doesn't exactly say "Caution, our coffee can give you third degree burns and generally f*** you up even if you start drinking it too soon, so good luck with that."

poetinahat
03-14-2006, 05:41 AM
I'd prefer to raspberry into your furnace trumpet, granny :)
Where have you gone, Niq-que Zoolio?
A forum turns its lonely eyes to you
Woo, woo, woo

poetinahat
03-14-2006, 05:42 AM
On boxes of Sun-Maid raisins:

"Why not try tossing over your favorite breakfast cereal?"

dahmnait
03-14-2006, 05:44 AM
On boxes of Sun-Maid raisins:

"Why not try tossing over your favorite breakfast cereal?"Where exactly should I toss the cereal?

poetinahat
03-14-2006, 05:48 AM
Um, how shall I put this:

Let's just say that, over here, "tossing" is a euphemism you might not have heard.

dahmnait
03-14-2006, 05:54 AM
<quickly looking it up online>


Oh my...:o I guess "where" to toss is not really the question.

Christine N.
03-14-2006, 06:33 AM
On boxes of Sun-Maid raisins:

"Why not try tossing over your favorite breakfast cereal?"

Because that's just gross.

(took me a second, but I got it - that's hysterical!)

Kevin Yarbrough
03-14-2006, 08:38 AM
but I would never stick a cup of hot coffee between my legs in a moving vehicle.

The only thing that hot I put between my legs is a woman and if that causes burns then they will be worth it. Plus any burn'ing I get can be cured with a shot of penicillin. Ahhh, memories of rug burns come flashing to my mind. Good times, good times.

What is the morale of this Mickey D's story? Don't drink coffee. If she would have had a nice cold coke between her legs she might have just ended up with frost bite on her clit. Did I say that?:Shrug:

Plus, I always found it funny that condoms have expiration dates on them. I can see this on the flavored kind but on regular ones? It's mot like we eat them or anything...I have had a few go MIA during sex though. Hmmm, makes you wonder where it went? I see them putting best if use by dates on them in the future. If condom not used by four weeks after purchase you're a dork. By a hooker and use them up so you can spend more money on condoms.

Maryn
03-14-2006, 05:42 PM
Latex degrades with time, my friend. Welcome to the Information Superhighway.

Maryn, who found a latex pacifier when the baby was 14 (it was all weird and gummy)

rtilryarms
03-14-2006, 05:51 PM
Oh.

I thought you could just keep using them until the expiration date. My bad.

Kevin Yarbrough
03-15-2006, 08:30 AM
I know that, Maryn, it's just weird to see expiration dates on something that is not perishable that's all. It should be best if used by dates or if you use this after the date on the bottom of the package then we are not responsible for the kids you might get.

Maryn
03-15-2006, 06:13 PM
Kevin, that would be simple and sensible--that's no way for package warnings to be!

Maryn, whose blister package of push pins tells her not to give them to children under 3, as in, Duh!