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ResearchGuy
03-11-2006, 12:46 AM
After a recent revelation that poetry need not have meter or rhyme, I have turned some extracts from policy reports into poetic form (meaning that the lines do not go all the way to the end). Read in the proper tone of voice, with nuanced intonations, this works. I can understand why some folks disdain all the old conventions of poetry. (Heh.)

The Poetry of Policy

“Mold”

During the 1990s, a series of
Widely publicized incidents and
Growing awareness of water-damaged
Indoor environments
Brought attention to the hazards of
Indoor mold growth.

“In Florida in the early 1990s,”
One expert has pointed out,
“Several new courthouses with moisture and mold
Growth problems were vacated and
Rebuilt with the repair costs
Exceeding the initial capital costs of the buildings.”


“San Joaquin Valley”

The eight counties of the San Joaquin Valley
Vary widely in population, area, population density, and topography.
Fresno, Tulare, and Madera extend well into the foothills and mountains to the east,
While San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, and Kings are more clearly
Confined to the valley.
Kern County extends well into the Mojave Desert on the east.

Countywide statistics,
Not to mention eight-county averages,
Encompass densely packed urban areas
As well as large, sparsely populated rural stretches.

“Employment”

Employment in the counties of the San Joaquin Valley
Has not stagnated over the last decade and a half.
There have been ups and downs over those years.
Some employment categories have declined
While others have risen, with each county
Having its own pattern.

But many jobs have been added
And some growth has been large.
This might be taken as a hopeful sign,
Not an indication of a fundamentally flawed economy,
Despite unemployment rates that stubbornly
Remain significantly higher than those of the state and the nation.

--Ken

P.S. Think the International Library of Poetry would give me a prize?

Albedo of Zero
03-11-2006, 05:24 AM
P.S. Think the International Library of Poetry would give me a prize?



Silly man, they only give pretend prizes. Don't they? Well at least you have a great chance at placing your poetry in one of its anthologies...if you buy the book.

Albedo of Zero
03-11-2006, 05:28 AM
Here's mine:


Horse Sense

With this colorful collection
of braided parachute cord
you
can mix
and match colors
or
have a complete set
at an affordable price.

Great for the beginning rider
or just
for everyday work.

ResearchGuy
03-11-2006, 07:11 AM
Here's mine:


Horse Sense

....
Moving, yet somehow hysterically funny. Well done!

--Ken

Yeshanu
03-12-2006, 06:50 AM
This one wasn't hard at all. They were already halfway there:


Around in Circles

It's a supply chain.
It's linear.
It's circular.
It never stops.
It's a process.
It's ongoing.
It's ever evolving.
It's your business.

In today's competitive market,
you
you need
a global solutions provider
who
is as determined as you are.

We're with you —
every step of the way.

(Company name omitted, but I'll admit they (or at least their ad people) write good poetry.)

ResearchGuy
03-12-2006, 08:36 AM
Scavenging among my old pieces on educational technology, I find this poetic gem (with the lines made short so it is 'poetry,' and some capitals added and punctuation adjusted):

"Constructivism"

Constructivism maintains that
Knowledge is actively "constructed"
In the mind of the learner,
Not passively received.

For that reason, it is vital
That the learner be engaged
In a hands-on fashion
In the learning of any subject.

A contrasting view of education
Emphasizes the learner as
Receiving knowledge imparted
By a teacher and by books,
As a vessel to be filled with learning.

The constructivist view sees the learner as
Actively engaging with tasks,
From which knowledge
May be built.

It is not clear that in practice
The dichotomy has been so stark,
And both sides may have engaged
In misrepresentation and name-calling.

But that is a discussion
For another time.

Yeshanu
03-12-2006, 11:47 PM
I think this thread might get more takers in poetry, so with Mr. Haskins' permission, I'm going to send a copy of it to the poetry forum.

kdnxdr
03-13-2006, 05:11 AM
Thank you so much for posting this wonderful thread!! The whole world is a poem and now, it's the business of the poets of the world to catch and release for the enjoyment of all poetry affectionadoes!

Birol
03-13-2006, 05:29 AM
For me, this thread does raise an interesting question. What does distinguish free verse poetry from prosity or prose with broken lines? What makes good free verse poetry?

To start the discussion, in my experience, free verse is not without structure or theme and much of it does have meter, if not rhyme.

What are everyone else's thoughts and/or experiences?

William Haskins
03-13-2006, 06:04 AM
what distinguishes the above from poetry, free verse or otherwise, is not the lack of more recognizable poetic conventions of meter and rhyme, but rather the lack of the more subtle techniques that elevate language.

rhyme and meter are pretty packaging, but even with them, a lack of metaphor or symbolism or assonance or alliteration or syncopation will make it feel empty and superficial.

i agree that "poetry need not have meter or rhyme"; however, i vehemently disagree that this means that any prose with clipped lines is poetry.

ETA: i guess i should also say (though it should be obvious to anyone who writes poetry) that a poem should also have a central image, idea or narrative (better yet, all of them), that is tied together with the language.

kdnxdr
03-13-2006, 08:41 AM
" a poem should also have a central image, idea or narrative (better yet, all of them), that is tied together with the language." W.H.

My question is this: doesn't all communication, by nature of being some sort of communication, have: 1) a central image 2) idea 3) or narrative and 4) is tied together with the language ?


example:

tick tick tick tick tick
beep beep beep beep beep beep beep
z z z z z


a poetic form, central image/idea/narrative, tied together with the language

good poem? Depends on the beauty/eye/beholder

William Haskins
03-13-2006, 08:47 AM
we'll just have to disagree. i'll err on the side of my own narrow view.

kdnxdr
03-13-2006, 09:14 AM
ying/yang thing to do
we agree to disagree
poet's politics

poetinahat
03-13-2006, 11:38 AM
I saw this thread not an assertion that every scrap of words, chopped up a bit, is poetry. To the contrary, it reads to me like a send-up of free verse that doesn't make the poetical grade. Sure, any text can be clipped and intoned to *read* like a poem, but that doesn't make it a poem.

Here's the money line:


I can understand why some folks disdain all the old conventions of poetry. (Heh.)

I'm reminded of a line from Bloom County, when the young Binkley is looking for reverse-masked "satanic messages" in heavy metal records. The lyric that recurs?

No matter how you slice it, it's still baloney.

Fun game, though.

kdnxdr
03-13-2006, 06:32 PM
narrow view conventions
the spine that holds us straight
otherwise
poet's would be neaderthals
the future not our fate

kdnxdr
03-13-2006, 06:44 PM
sorry, I'm not trying to be contentious............I've seen this argument for form/convention come up in several different threads. And, it's a question that I think haunts any artist who is trying to express; it is a dynamic of any communication. What wants to be communicated cannot be communicated unless it is received. It can be expressed but not communicated. My point being, expression and communication are in the same activity but with different goals.

I think there are two camps of artist, those that practice convention and those that go out of their way to break convention. That's why people divide over art so strongly, part of the populace clings to convention/tradition and part are always trying to do away with convention/tradition.

Each must find their camp and enjoy where they are. We find a stasis of coexistence, otherwise, humanity would already be wiped out.


The two camps help to clarify what the other is not. How would we know light without dark, tall without short, fat without thin, the truth without the lie, sin without law?

William Haskins
03-13-2006, 06:49 PM
well, i can assure you that i'm neither a purist nor a traditionalist when it comes to poetry; however, i felt it important to state my case on the underlying premise of this thread (tongue-in-cheek though it may be). i have no problem with folks having fun with it but, at the same time, i would hate for a novice to come away thinking that they're moving closer to poetry by simply clipping lines.

please, by all means, go forth and have fun.

kdnxdr
03-13-2006, 07:12 PM
AW is so incredible. It's because there are people in AW that are educated, experienced and published. And, those people are so kind to give their critiques that address the very things that you are discussing. And, as the good and bad come together on a level field, embracing each other just for being in the world of poetry, they influence us to stretch, try new things and learn to appreciate the forms that have made poetry the wonderful art that it is.

Birol
03-13-2006, 10:23 PM
I agree with William. Poetry is far more than the arrangement of lines to create a visual image. Regardless of the form -- haiku, sonnet, free verse -- the words themselves conjure up images and emotions that are not necessarily spelled out. At its truest level, poetry is stories that speak to the soul as well as to the mind.

MacAllister
03-13-2006, 10:28 PM
I think mostly, for me, poetry must be the most efficient writing form, in terms of squeezing not just the single, perfect meaning from each word--even the articles--but as many meanings and layers as the poet can possibly orchestrate and then control.

Yeshanu
03-14-2006, 12:16 AM
I agree with William, too, in that free verse is more than just clipping lines. But what I saw from some of these poems is that some well-written prose comes very close to poetry.

While I was reading through a magazine, trying to find something to cut into short lines for this thread, I found that most of it didn't work at all. But some of it does end up working...

Don't know where I'm going with this, but it helps me look at some prose in a different light.

I also found that the "poetic" rewrites of the first examples by Research Guy were easier to read than the prose would have been. Perhaps we should pass a law that all scientific and government reports should be written as poetry? :tongue

poetinahat
03-14-2006, 01:51 AM
I also found that the "poetic" rewrites of the first examples by Research Guy were easier to read than the prose would have been. Perhaps we should pass a law that all scientific and government reports should be written as poetry? :tongue
O Queen, come back and reclaim your throne!

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 07:05 AM
It's like boiling something to it's essence. In cooking, it's referred to as reduction.

William Haskins
03-14-2006, 07:18 AM
there is an inherent beauty in language that can be brought out by distillation from a larger text. but, at best, meaning must be imposed on it.

Cassie88
03-14-2006, 07:28 AM
Whether we call them poems or not, they're boring. I had to force myself to read the first ones all the way through.

William Haskins
03-14-2006, 07:30 AM
the problem i have with it (not in practice here for sh1ts and giggles, which is fine, but philosophically) is that, to me, what ends up on the page is not the poem.

it's rather the closest that language can come to describing the idea, the story, the image in the mind of the poet.

therefore, to me, a poem must start as a poem. it can't be reduced to one.

ResearchGuy
03-14-2006, 07:32 AM
Whether we call them poems or not, they're boring. I had to force myself to read the first ones all the way through.
Flattery will get you nowhere. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/icons/icon12.gif

--Ken

MacAllister
03-14-2006, 07:39 AM
This, then, William, would be your criticism of the poetry generator programs, too?

That the poet's intent and deliberation in constructing the work trumps the reader's imposition of external meaning?

William Haskins
03-14-2006, 07:57 AM
absolutely. and i've touched on this before in another thread. i find language insufficient. less so than thousands of years ago, of course, but surely all can agree that language has evolved from a smaller set of words to a much larger one. and if one concedes that, one must also concede that there is no "complete" language, that it must still be growing.

and it's also easy to wrap your head around the fact that language follows thought and not creates it.

therefore, to assume that anything can be perfectly captured in words, one would have to believe that language is complete and that the human mind is nothing more than what can be explained by stringing together seemingly random vocalized grunts.

so, to me, a poem is the thing in your mind. language is a vehicle for it, and the goal is to use what language you have at your disposal to get the tower as close as possible to heaven.

a poem is a deliberate act, not a manipulation of some text generated in another form, for another purpose.

sorry, i'm rambling...

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 07:57 AM
What's a poetry generator program?

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 08:04 AM
What if you are trying to use language to do something that language can't honestly do, William? What if the poem can never reach heaven? Is capturing inspiration the goal of poetry?

What if poetry is just a "cry out", the angst of knowing you can never reach heaven and the realization you are cut off from whense you came?

William Haskins
03-14-2006, 08:06 AM
"the unexamined life is not worth living." - socrates

poetinahat
03-14-2006, 08:17 AM
What if poetry is just a "cry out", the angst of knowing you can never reach heaven and the realization you are cut off from whense you came?
A Howl (http://www.poetryconnection.net/poets/Allen_Ginsberg/3688), so to speak?

"Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, or what's a heaven for?"
-- Robert Browning

Stew21
03-14-2006, 08:32 AM
absolutely. and i've touched on this before in another thread. i find language insufficient. less so than thousands of years ago, of course, but surely all can agree that language has evolved from a smaller set of words to a much larger one. and if one concedes that, one must also concede that there is no "complete" language, that it must still be growing.

and it's also easy to wrap your head around the fact that language follows thought and not creates it.

therefore, to assume that anything can be perfectly captured in words, one would have to believe that language is complete and that the human mind is nothing more than what can be explained by stringing together seemingly random vocalized grunts.

so, to me, a poem is the thing in your mind. language is a vehicle for it, and the goal is to use what language you have at your disposal to get the tower as close as possible to heaven.

a poem is a deliberate act, not a manipulation of some text generated in another form, for another purpose.

sorry, i'm rambling...

I had a prof. of linguistics in college that would completely agree with you regarding language continually growing and changing. The thoughts ARE bigger than the words, therefore we create more words. I entirely agreed with him. We had several weeks' worth of classes on the development of language and creation of new words (or even old words with new meanings - development of slang) So I just wanted to tell you...Well put. I completely agree, so would Dr. Caso, my old prof.
I am also reminded of Henry Rollins as he talks about uses of language, and that so many people fail to push the limits of their language, in poetry, music, and even in regular everyday comm.
He would derive slang meaning out of misused phrases; Such as when a German waiter told him, "your choice is fish." The lack of an option being present with the word choice in the sentence made them laugh, and he gave that a new meaning: you have no options. When someone complains about having to do something, they would now say, "your choice is fish man" - you don't have an option. And another example, a sign on a bathroom faucet in Japan, "Be Drinkable" - poor use of English stating that the water was ok to drink- turned exquisite when he and his band decided it was slang for "relax, take it easy, go with the flow". "yo man, don't be so uptight, be drinkable." He imparted new meaning to simple words because of how they were put together...the beauty isn't in the words as they were intended originally, (by the waiter or the japanese hotel bathroom sign) it is in the creator's interpretation and manipulation of them - assigning them meaning. in essence, creating more language This would mean that it wasn't poetic when they said it or put it on a sign, but it was when Rollins made that "deliberate act" of turning it into something.
now I'm rambling...sorry....
You just managed to strike a couple of points with me.

Trish

MacAllister
03-14-2006, 08:44 AM
it's also easy to wrap your head around the fact that language follows thought and not creates it.

I want to go back and examine this--it's a very modern vs. postmodern approach to theory, and I'm intrigued.

To a certain degree, yes, of course that statement is true--however, as the language evolves, there is--I think--a case to be made for the more perfect articulation of concepts providing a gestalt within which the ideas themselves can evolve in terms of complexity.

Poetry generators (http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient-ff&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGGL,GGGL:2005-09,GGGL:en&q=random+poetry+generator), of course, being the logical result of post modernism run amok--I'm inclined to agree with you, and think post-modernism is something of a dead-end for art.

Unique
03-14-2006, 02:54 PM
"

My question is this: doesn't all communication, by nature of being some sort of communication, have: 1) a central image 2) idea 3) or narrative and 4) is tied together with the language ?




In short, no.

I truly envy you that you've never been bored stupid by someone who talked, and talked, and talked, and talked...and yet said nothing. You are truly blessed.

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 06:16 PM
I have had the opportunity, and I'm sure, I have even been that person. Working with people, I took the position that every person, regardless of how I experienced them, had worth and something to say. The culling process comes after listening to them.

If the experince of listening to them became too much, it became an experience I didn't want to repeat.

I say all that to say that in our society of "bytes", it seems that unless a certain criteria is met, our culture tends to "bite ones head off" so that one no longer has a voice.

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 06:28 PM
McAllister, thank you for definition of 'poet generator'. Maybe all brains are poet generators of sorts, some just better than others.

Poetinahat, thank you for Howl. Precisely.

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 06:41 PM
on the concept of language following thought: I agree, how could you speak if there was nothing 'on the board' to say? However, when sound and even body language cease to be integral to communication there is documented atrophy, especially with young childrens' development and the ageing. Given this, I like to think that thought/sound/body movement is, in fact, all parts of one thing. It seems in mechanization, communication becomes more specific to programming (vs. thought) and machine function (vs. significant/intentful sound and expressive moment). And, I do believe the machine world will not listen to anything that does not fit into it's perameters and will cull what does not function accordingly.

William Haskins
03-14-2006, 07:07 PM
To a certain degree, yes, of course that statement is true--however, as the language evolves, there is--I think--a case to be made for the more perfect articulation of concepts providing a gestalt within which the ideas themselves can evolve in terms of complexity.

i agree with this, and don't see the two views as mutually exclusive. in fact, ideas can be transformed, enhanced and made stronger by the language chosen to convey them.

i guess, at the end of the day, for me it comes back to the deliberate act of creating a thing called a poem.

Stew21
03-14-2006, 07:25 PM
on the concept of language following thought: I agree, how could you speak if there was nothing 'on the board' to say? However, when sound and even body language cease to be integral to communication there is documented atrophy, especially with young childrens' development and the ageing. Given this, I like to think that thought/sound/body movement is, in fact, all parts of one thing. It seems in mechanization, communication becomes more specific to programming (vs. thought) and machine function (vs. significant/intentful sound and expressive moment). And, I do believe the machine world will not listen to anything that does not fit into it's perameters and will cull what does not function accordingly.

I think more than just following thought, that what I was leaning towards is that thought is greater than its expression of it in word; therefore we try to create more, or different, ways of expression ourselves - expanding those words, so we can touch that thought in a different way - striving to communicate more to the point, or with more meaning than sometimes simple words convey. sound and body language are a big part of communication, sometimes its all we have when our language fails us, and sometimes sound and movement fail us and our language is all we have. Sound thought and body movement are definitely all part of the same thing; interpersonal communication. In poetry or any creative writing form (with exceptions of theater, lyrics and screenplays), we don't have the vehicles of sound and body to express - the words have to suffice - therein lies a challenge. In relation to language and poetry, it is, to me, deliberate communication of creation. I reference Rollins again, the waiter said, "your choice is fish" - meaning that's all we have in the kitchen. Rollins says it and it means you have no options. Same words, new meaning. It expresses a thought in a new way and finds meaning. That is creation of language. You can plug every word of our language with as many definitions as you would like, including slang, into a machine, and quite certainly in a matter of a minute there would be a meaning lost, or a new one that wasn't included. It is constantly changing. something machines can't do that we can. Poetry is same words, new way of using them.
One last thought, If I splatter paint on a drop cloth while I paint my living room it isn't art. If an artist like Jackson Pollack has a canvas with colors,swirls and dribbles it is art, because there is intention to convey emotion and thought, with a central purpose or idea.

wow - I do like this topic, but it makes me ramble!

Trish

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 08:54 PM
"In poetry or any creative writing form (with exceptions of theater, lyrics and screenplays), we don't have the vehicles of sound and body to express - the words have to suffice - therein lies a challenge. "


What has become so interesting within poetry is the advent of the slam/jam and all it's various forms of expression, including various elements of sound/movement.

Even with art, per se, layering dimentions of experience are finding more and more venues.


"One last thought, If I splatter paint on a drop cloth while I paint my living room it isn't art. If an artist like Jackson Pollack has a canvas with colors,swirls and dribbles it is art, because there is intention to convey emotion and thought, with a central purpose or idea."


I have admired many a paint spattered floor. I know a woman who so admired her unintentionally paint spattered floor, she left it they way as part of her decor. Through looking at the spattered paint she could feel the experience that it came from which involved all the elements of communication. The floor captured the experience of her house getting painted and conveyed that total experience to her.

It seems that art is always measured by the beauty/eye/beholder formula.

I scanned an article in a scientific journal a few years back that talked about chaos experiments and that through those experiments they were discovering that chaos itself has order. Bizarro! but cool. Randomness has perameters, gave me something to think about.

Stew21
03-14-2006, 09:00 PM
[QUOTE=kdnxdr


I have admired many a paint spattered floor. I know a woman who so admired her unintentionally spaint spattered floor, she left it they way as part of her decor. Through looking at the spattered paint she could feel the experience that it came from which involved all the elements of communication. The floor captured the experience of her house getting painted and conveyed that total experience to her.


[/QUOTE]

She looked at the randomness and found something. It turned into a deliberate statement - art. In itself, that is creation - she assigned meaning to it.
Excellent example!

kdnxdr
03-14-2006, 09:00 PM
It's funny when I think of looking at something that captures my attention. I first see the picture of it, I, in turn, attempt to capture that picture in words with the intent of conveying that picture+my experience of it to a third party( which can exist or not exist). It's the conveying of something that becomes the work of my poetry splattered on the wall.

William Haskins
03-14-2006, 09:05 PM
She looked at the randomness and found something. It turned into a deliberate statement - art. In itself, that is creation - she assigned meaning to it.
Excellent example!

art, by definition, is made by humans. i can see the face of god in a cloud formation, but that doesn't make it art.

Stew21
03-14-2006, 09:45 PM
art, by definition, is made by humans. i can see the face of god in a cloud formation, but that doesn't make it art.

agreed. and I will be the first to admit I don't know anything about art, I was a communications major, that's what I know. So my example may have "painted" me into a corner. I guess I was just saying that to her it became a form of expression - or probably more accurately, she became sentimental about what it represented to her. (I'd just assume she had a mess to clean up and didn't.)

ddgryphon
03-14-2006, 11:24 PM
I basically agree with William on this. Intention is part and parcel to the act. Poetry, and art in general, doesn't just happen, it is made. I think most of the experiments to create art out of randomness have been terrible failures (ee cummings ra34nasd-[g 28* 0( b037y experiments, Random music, and I think slam poetry that isn't written prior to the event, but made up on the spot is poor. Politics using art as a vehicle though also usually fails, and art trying to be political doesn't much live beyond its time more than a campaign song.

Literature tries to reach out and find a common universiality in something personal or, sometimes, something societal. The best of it shouldn't take sides or moralize, but observe, while expressing feeling.

Well, now I'm rambling. Opening a book and copying lines in a poetic form doesn't make it art or poetry.

The Let Command
----------------------------
The let command
can be used for all of the
basic arithmetic operations,
Including
addition,
subtraction,
multiplication,
integer division,
calculating a
remainder, and
inequalities.

It also provides
more specialized
expressions
inside double
parentheses as
arithmetic operations.

This form is especially
useful in loops and
conditional tests.
The following
Example uses this
construct to print
the first ten integers:

i=1
while ((i<=10))
do
echo $i
(( i=i+1))
done



will never be poetry, but the inspiration for a poem can be found there:

The Command Let
---------------------------------
I operate under the
Command LET
I equal one
and while I
less than two
do echo
I plus one
until
I equal two

Stew21
03-14-2006, 11:34 PM
Opening a book and copying lines in a poetic form doesn't make it art or poetry.


DDG - I absolutely agree. Intention in creation.

kdnxdr
03-15-2006, 04:54 AM
nice poem

Albedo of Zero
03-15-2006, 05:12 AM
You guys ruined all the fun...or not.


Hot Stuff (worcestrshire shaken, not stirred)

distilled
vinegar and molasses
corn
syrup salt with water

marinate steak
chicken or chops
for zestier flavor

spices caramel color
anchovy
puree tamarind extract

splash
ground meat for hearty
burgers
and meatloaf

natural flavor
add to beef
stir-fry s
soy lecithin and stews, chili and soups.

kdnxdr
03-15-2006, 05:18 AM
lol..............it just popped out.............sorry

KellyAssauer
03-15-2006, 06:28 AM
I too will agree that taking the first sentence your index finger finds in the random open page of any book and rewriting it into a poem form, is not truly poetry. I have, however, found two really useful things to do with that sentence.

The first thing you can do is use the sentence as the motivation subject to start writing, especially if you realize that the sentence came from a whole book, a book started and finished and published! It might not be the the most quotable, clever, or wise sentence, but when’s the last time you read a book that was utterly one clever line after another? (excluding of course books of Richard Braugtigan Poetry) Chances are, your sentence is one of those uncelebrated ones that holds the everything together!

kdnxdr
08-12-2006, 11:51 PM
the mean of meaning
means something
if anything is meant
by what this means
meaning that
mean meanings
may mean
that I am writing
something
very mean

wordsheff
08-15-2006, 12:37 PM
Those first few posts were kind of scary...only because I'm a beginning writer and I didn't honestly see a HUGE, discernible difference between what was posted and what gets posted in forums all over the net day to day.
First of all, the idea of a central image, etc...isn't that what advertisements, slogans, jingles, are written to do? So maybe in a way (sorry, this hurts to say) some advertising is almost a form of poetry, just aimed in a different direction, to sell product, etc.
I think it made me a little sad too, to see how little people understand free verse. I don't claim to understand all its powers in any sense, and yes, I do read W.C. Williams and ask, "Why is this a poem?" (at times). I guess, this is just something we as people who want to write important poetry have to deal with: the fact that this is what the mainstream reader thinks free verse is.
I think that can be changed.
-WS