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View Full Version : Trivia questions - the Dummies thread



aruna
03-12-2006, 10:56 AM
This thread is for those of us who have just one trivia question, but vital for our Masterpiece, for which it's not worth starting a whole new thread.

So here's the first question. First person to answer gets a rep point!

I've got a flatbed truck in my WIP, and it gets a puncture. Where would the spare tyre and the jack etc be kept?

Celia Cyanide
03-12-2006, 11:01 AM
Dammit! I'm the first one to view it, and it has to be a car question! I can't even drive! ;)

Fern
03-12-2006, 05:54 PM
Jack, under the hood.
Tire on the flat bed.

Maryn
03-14-2006, 07:22 PM
I need a descriptive term and/or name for an antique desk which would cost at least $10,000 (US). I'll plug it into sentences like His best client’s worst boots litter his _______ ______ desk with pellets of dried mud.

Any information on whether the desk would have one or more locking drawers would be a bonus.

Maryn, once again disappointed in Google's inability to weed out superfluous hits

alleycat
03-14-2006, 08:43 PM
The jack in the narrow space behind the front seat, tire underneath the bed of the truck in the rear; although both of these things vary. For example, some trucks have a little storage box mounted to the side where a jack could be kept.

ac

aruna
03-14-2006, 08:48 PM
I need a descriptive term and/or name for an antique desk which would cost at least $10,000 (US). I'll plug it into sentences like His best client’s worst boots litter his _______ ______ desk with pellets of dried mud.

Any information on whether the desk would have one or more locking drawers would be a bonus.

Maryn, once again disappointed in Google's inability to weed out superfluous hits

What about a Victorian desk? Here's a photo:
http://www.custommade.com/gallery/PA-woodworker/Victorian-desk.html

alleycat
03-14-2006, 08:49 PM
I need a descriptive term and/or name for an antique desk which would cost at least $10,000 (US). I'll plug it into sentences like His best client’s worst boots litter his _______ ______ desk with pellets of dried mud.

Any information on whether the desk would have one or more locking drawers would be a bonus.

Maryn, once again disappointed in Google's inability to weed out superfluous hits

His best client’s worst boots litter his antique Boston desk with pellets of dried mud.

His best client’s worst boots litter the desk once belonging to Ethan Allen with pellets of dried mud.

His best client’s worst boots litter his early American walnut desk with pellets of dried mud.

Tish Davidson
03-14-2006, 10:50 PM
Antique roll top desk.

Her is a link to a dozen photos of these desks

http://images.google.com/images?q=roll+top+desk&hl=en&btnG=Search+Images

My parents have an old one made of curley maple, so you could also mention the wood (oak roll top desk, curley maple roll top desk)

Maryn
03-15-2006, 12:12 AM
Are these desks expensive enough? Ten thousand dollars? I need something that only a person of wealth would have in his office.

arrowqueen
03-15-2006, 12:45 AM
Louis XIV escritoire?

alleycat
03-15-2006, 01:20 AM
Are these desks expensive enough? Ten thousand dollars? I need something that only a person of wealth would have in his office.
Any well-made American furniture from earlier than the early 1800s by any one of the famous makers is worth a small fortune (you couldn't touch a desk for $10,000). If the piece was once owned by someone of historical important, the price goes up from there.

If you don't like that idea, you could use a custom made desk; the price is anywhere from $2,000 to $50,000+, according to how fancy the thing is, and what kind of wood, etc.

You can go into any high-end furniture store today and easily pay $10,000 for a solid wood desk.

ac

Maryn
03-15-2006, 01:55 AM
Uh-oh, my formica-over-particleboard budget shows, doesn't it? Thanks!

aruna
03-21-2006, 12:22 PM
I have a Dummy question:

Did California ever have the Death Penalty? What about in 1978?

alleycat
03-21-2006, 04:09 PM
They did, they do.

I'm not sure about 1978. I would guess that was during the time that most death sentences were on hold in all states due to a Supreme Court ruling.

Maybe a Californian will come along who knows for sure.

Maryn
03-21-2006, 06:28 PM
Yes, California had the death penalty.

In 1972 and again in 1976 the California courts declared the death penalty "cruel and unusual punishment" and 175 death-row prisoners were re-sentenced.

In August of 1977, California reinstated the death penalty for first-degree murder with specific factors which included murder
for financial gain
by someone with a previous murder conviction
of multiple people in a single incident
involving torture
of a law enforcement officer
In 1978, California voters approved an even broader death penalty law.

Executions in California resumed in 1992. As far as I can tell, they last executed someone in January 2005.

Maryn, hoping this helped

aruna
03-21-2006, 06:49 PM
Maryn, hoping this helped

Yes, and thanks to both of you!

PastMidnight
04-18-2006, 02:42 PM
Ok, I have a quick question:

If I were to go north on the Mississippi River, would I be going upriver or downriver? What about the Missouri River (northeast on the Missouri)?

triceretops
04-18-2006, 02:48 PM
You'd be going up-river in both instances, I believe. Old man river dumps in the Gulf.

Tri

alleycat
04-18-2006, 03:34 PM
You'd be going upriver on both, but I assume you actually meant going northwest on the Missouri. The Missouri generally flows eastward, or southeastward until it converges into the Mississippi near St. Louis.

ac

Maryn
04-18-2006, 04:59 PM
There are only a handful of rivers which flow north. I live near one (the Genesee). You can see at list of them here (http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/infopage/riversno.htm).

Maryn, font of useless information

ideagirl
04-19-2006, 03:55 AM
Has anyone here ever visited, worked in, or been a patient in a British hospital? A character in my book is severely injured and taken to the trauma unit... I need to know what it's like (does he get assigned his own nurse or is he served by whoever happens to be there, does he see a doctor often or not, what are visiting hours like...). Any experience with British hospitals is welcome, whether or not it was on the trauma unit--any little tidbit of info could come in handy for enhancing the realism of these scenes.

Medievalist
04-19-2006, 04:52 AM
Has anyone here ever visited, worked in, or been a patient in a British hospital? A character in my book is severely injured and taken to the trauma unit... I need to know what it's like (does he get assigned his own nurse or is he served by whoever happens to be there, does he see a doctor often or not, what are visiting hours like...). Any experience with British hospitals is welcome, whether or not it was on the trauma unit--any little tidbit of info could come in handy for enhancing the realism of these scenes.


You could do this via Google; hospitals have pages of this kind of data for patients and their families.

johnnysannie
04-19-2006, 05:05 AM
Ok, I have a quick question:

If I were to go north on the Mississippi River, would I be going upriver or downriver? What about the Missouri River (northeast on the Missouri)?

Upriver on both counts.

As for the Missouri River, it depends on what portion of the river you mean. Near my hometown of St. Joseph, Missouri, the Missouri River runs north/south. It doesn't turn eastward until Kansas City where it does take an rather easterly trek toward St. Louis where the confluence with the mighty Mississippi occurs upstream of downtown St. Louis.

In parts of Montana, it would be possible to travel northeast on the Missouri River but that's getting close to the river's source and it's not as big there as later in its' route.

waylander
04-19-2006, 01:17 PM
Has anyone here ever visited, worked in, or been a patient in a British hospital? A character in my book is severely injured and taken to the trauma unit... I need to know what it's like (does he get assigned his own nurse or is he served by whoever happens to be there, does he see a doctor often or not, what are visiting hours like...). Any experience with British hospitals is welcome, whether or not it was on the trauma unit--any little tidbit of info could come in handy for enhancing the realism of these scenes.

A severely injured patient would most likely arrive by ambulance (summoned by dialing 999). The paramedic crew in the ambulance would call ahead with details of the injuries so that the patient could be met by a team in the A+E dept and, if necessary, go straight into theatre. Anyone accompanying them gets to do a lot of waiting around and drinking of vending machine coffee/tea (there are visitors cafes in many of the larger hospitals). Anyone who followed the ambulance in their own car might very well find they spend a lot of money in car-parking charges in the hospital car park.

My wife is a nurse in a NHS hospital. PM me if you need more detail

PastMidnight
04-20-2006, 03:03 AM
You'd be going upriver on both, but I assume you actually meant going northwest on the Missouri. The Missouri generally flows eastward, or southeastward until it converges into the Mississippi near St. Louis.


You're right, I did mean to type northwest. http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/e2hammer.gif

Thanks to everyone who responded! I thought that both flowed southerly (the Missouri into the Mississippi, the Mississippi into the Gulf of Mexico), but wasn't positive and wasn't sure how to find the answer to this.

Melisande
04-20-2006, 10:41 PM
Going with a river's flow, is always to go down river, going against it, is to go up river. Doesn't matter what river, or which geographical direction. Compare upstream/downstream.