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LOTLOF
02-24-2014, 02:13 PM
I was just curious. What was the best compliment you ever received on anything you had written? For me it's when I'm told something I wrote made someone cry, get angry, or laugh out loud. I love knowing that my words were able to get an emotional response from someone.

WriterBN
02-24-2014, 07:13 PM
I always appreciate reviews of my work when they mention specific aspects of my writing. Like yours, my favorite compliment was a an e-mail from a reader who said one of my stories moved her to tears.

lauralam
02-24-2014, 07:28 PM
The last sentence of this fan mail I got from a 15-year-old stranger:

"Your stories never get old and I would just like to tell you that you are my favorite author of all time and your books are also my favorite books on earth, and I in my 15 years of living have read many books but nothing as amazing and wonderful as Pantomime and Shadowplay. Thank you."

*sobs forever*

Brutal Mustang
02-24-2014, 07:35 PM
The last sentence of this fan mail I got from a 15-year-old stranger:

"Your stories never get old and I would just like to tell you that you are my favorite author of all time and your books are also my favorite books on earth, and I in my 15 years of living have read many books but nothing as amazing and wonderful as Pantomime and Shadowplay. Thank you."

*sobs forever*

That's awesome! For me, it's when someone says they teared up, or laughed.

KateSmash
02-24-2014, 08:30 PM
Honestly? Last week I let sir Smash read draft 1.5 of my WIP. At one point (where the stuff really hits the fan) he set it down, glared at me, and hissed "I hate you so much right now" then went right back to reading.

If I can get that response out of everyone, I'll die happy.

Calla Lily
02-24-2014, 08:49 PM
An angry fan mail that began:

I want you to know that I do not like to read and I read all three of your books in 48 hours. Where is the next one?

I :roll:ed at the accusation that I had forced someone to both read and like my books. We've exchanged a few emails since.

thedark
02-24-2014, 08:52 PM
Last week, I'd gone to a local writing group where we read small excerpts aloud then participate in live critiquing. I'd meant to ask questions about the tension and pacing of a particular scene from my Psychological Thriller, so as I read aloud, I paid attention to the reactions of the other folks in the room.

A few were were physically clutching the edge of the table, and others had tensed shoulders and clenched hands. As that scene ended, folks leaned back in their chairs, and visibly exhaled in release.

I didn't have to ask - they told me with both their actions and later, with their words, that the tension was strong. My favorite comment was a simple one word response to that section.

Intense.

MookyMcD
02-24-2014, 08:53 PM
"You bastard! This book was not supposed to make me cry."

One of the benefits of writing real-world humor. When the real world stops being funny, it's a pretty big emotional swing (although it's a lot of work to ease the tone back to light).

Perks
02-24-2014, 09:31 PM
The best compliment I ever got was from a woman at a conference last year. She said that when she saw that I was going to be there, she switched around her packing so that she could bring her copy of TGF for me to sign.

But the best part was that she told me that she had been frustrated with my book at first, because she was trying to read at her usual speed (the one that let her read three to four books a week) and that she kept tripping up. She said she sighed and said to herself, "Read it the way the author wrote it."

She said the book ended up reminding her how much she loved language and that it has caused her to stop skim-reading to devour a book just for the story.

Obviously, I'm still not over that conversation. i don't think I ever will be.

Maggie Maxwell
02-24-2014, 09:42 PM
Honestly? Last week I let sir Smash read draft 1.5 of my WIP. At one point (where the stuff really hits the fan) he set it down, glared at me, and hissed "I hate you so much right now" then went right back to reading.

If I can get that response out of everyone, I'll die happy.

I haven't got anything out for anyone to read yet, but I've never had the nerve to let Mr. Maxwell read anything of mine. I finally handed him a short story, and seeing him laugh at all the right parts gave me all the confidence in the world.

Liosse de Velishaf
02-24-2014, 09:56 PM
Honestly? Last week I let sir Smash read draft 1.5 of my WIP. At one point (where the stuff really hits the fan) he set it down, glared at me, and hissed "I hate you so much right now" then went right back to reading.

If I can get that response out of everyone, I'll die happy.


If I had a best compliment given to me, I imagine it would be along these lines; that's certainly the type of thing I am likely to say to the author of a book I really love, too.

Little Anonymous Me
02-24-2014, 10:02 PM
When my beta looked up and said 'If you kill that character, I won't read the rest.'

KateSmash
02-24-2014, 10:12 PM
I haven't got anything out for anyone to read yet, but I've never had the nerve to let Mr. Maxwell read anything of mine. I finally handed him a short story, and seeing him laugh at all the right parts gave me all the confidence in the world.

Mine would sneak into my computer and read my stuff anyway if I didn't let him. It was annoying until I released there's something really motivating about his fan-boyishness. Especially as he's a pretty detached and reserved person 90% of the time.

Yay live-in cheerleaders!

Putputt
02-24-2014, 10:14 PM
When one of my betas sent me this critique:

"Let me just start off by saying OH MY FUCKING GOD I CAN'T BELIEVE YOU KILLED [bleep]

FUCK. HOLY FUCK. I DID NOT SEE ANY OF THAT STUFF COMING.

SHIT.

...I thought that would get it out of my system, but nope, it's still there...

Anyway. I should move on. I guess. *FUCK*"

Celeste Carrara
02-24-2014, 10:26 PM
Well, mine is a bit different from the compliments you all have shared.

My best compliment was from a reader who told me she had to go change her panites after reading one of my books!

As an erotic writer you can see why such a compliment would make my day :roll:

Phaeal
02-24-2014, 10:28 PM
A Very Big Editor said my pet short story was "so beautifully written." Didn't buy it -- in fact, I have to send pet out again today -- but YES! It is, it is, it's beautifully written, I'm a beautiful writer, I writes beautiful, hahahahahahahaha....

thedark
02-24-2014, 10:31 PM
Well, mine is a bit different from the compliments you all have shared.

My best compliment was from a reader who told me she had to go change her panites after reading one of my books!

As an erotic writer you can see why such a compliment would make my day :roll:

Teehee! I love that.

And your post reminded me of the first time I asked a male friend to review my first-ever sex scene. He did, and gave me some great feedback on male viewpoints.. then a few days later I overheard him discussing the scene with another group of writers. Let's just say he related how titillating he found it, and how he had to go find some alone time afterwards... chortle. He never told me that--but it was delightful to overhear.

LJD
02-24-2014, 10:41 PM
Being told my book was funny.

SunshineonMe
02-24-2014, 10:45 PM
I have two, sorry-

The first- a review that said they loved my book so much they read it on a cell phone because they couldn't put it down. I mean seriously??? (If you do this, my hats off to you, the screen size drives me nuts)

My other said she stayed up until 4:30 am because she couldn't put it down.

Jamesaritchie
02-24-2014, 11:49 PM
Two stand out. The first came from a fan who said he loved the book so much he had someone sculpt a statue of the protagonist. He also had one made and sent to me. It's about a foot tall, and beautiful. It looks exactly like I had the character pictured.

The second came from an editor. During the editing process, she wrote a note in the margin of the manuscript, and underlined a sentence. I read it, expecting it to ask a question, or point out an error. Instead, the margin note read, "This is why I became an editor."

Well, I liked the sentence, too, but coming from a professional editor, it meant something special, and I've never forgotten it.

Jamesaritchie
02-24-2014, 11:50 PM
Teehee! I love that.

And your post reminded me of the first time I asked a male friend to review my first-ever sex scene. He did, and gave me some great feedback on male viewpoints.. then a few days later I overheard him discussing the scene with another group of writers. Let's just say he related how titillating he found it, and how he had to go find some alone time afterwards... chortle. He never told me that--but it was delightful to overhear.

Now that must have been a great scene. In the future, you might not want to show such a scene to anyone who doesn't have a partner at the moment.

thedark
02-24-2014, 11:58 PM
Now that must have been a great scene. In the future, you might not want to show such a scene to anyone who doesn't have a partner at the moment.

Oh James, you made me smile.

lbender
02-24-2014, 11:59 PM
Two, actually, from the same person, on two different novels.

In the first, she interrupted her reading to yell at me that she couldn't believe I'd had my character do something. She was very upset. I had her finish the section and she calmed down and forgave me.

During the second novel, she was reading a tense portion and I found her massaging her eyes as though they hurt. I questioned her and she told me she 'forgot to blink' during the reading.

Tepelus
02-25-2014, 05:38 AM
My beta told me that my impaling scene was brilliant.

jaksen
02-25-2014, 06:02 AM
I was voted most quiet in my high school class. (160 students). My 12th grade teacher read a story I wrote aloud to my class.

When he was done, the girl voted most popular, most likely to succeed and be most famous, etc., etc., cried out, "Oh my God, I can't stop crying." And she couldn't. Later she stopped me in the corridor to tell me how much she loved the story.

I was only sixteen and it was one of the first compliments I'd ever got about anything I wrote. I have never forgotten it and some day I need to track that girl down and tell her.

it-girl
02-25-2014, 08:04 AM
An avid reader who will read books into the early hours of the morning if it's good did the same with mine and wanted to know if I was going to do a sequel.

Another avid reader who read my book said she could not put it down. She was supposed to go somewhere with her family and did not go because she wanted to finish my book. I got a good laugh out of that.

blacbird
02-25-2014, 09:39 AM
"Not for us." Have received that numerous times.

caw

SunshineonMe
02-25-2014, 09:46 AM
"Not for us." Have received that numerous times.

caw

I read your work in SYW- you are an awesome writer. I felt like I was there. I love marking up papers with red when I beta read, and I didn't leave any marks.
You did a great job.

/caw caou cough cough

blacbird
02-25-2014, 09:52 AM
I read your work in SYW- you are an awesome writer. I felt like I was there. I love marking up papers with red when I beta read, and I didn't leave any marks.
You did a great job.

I do appreciate this comment, didn't want anybody to think I don't. I was being facetious. Is better than the "not for us" crowd, and, truthfully, I've had other nice comments, too. Just none from any place I've submitted to.

caw

SunshineonMe
02-25-2014, 10:12 AM
I do appreciate this comment, didn't want anybody to think I don't. I was being facetious. Is better than the "not for us" crowd, and, truthfully, I've had other nice comments, too. Just none from any place I've submitted to.

caw

You worked me :rant:
just kidding lol

jeffo20
02-25-2014, 03:33 PM
Speaking as someone who still has only beta readers...

I love it, of course, when I get a manuscript back and the cover note goes along the lines of "This was fantastic!/I loved it/etc." But I think my favorite thing is when I find a little comment bubble attached to a sentence or paragraph that says something like, "OMG, this is so true!"

Lineykins
02-25-2014, 05:09 PM
A little girl from another country sent me a letter as her "favourite author". ♥

Siri Kirpal
02-25-2014, 11:03 PM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

My youngest niece said her favorite writing were Laura Engels, JK Rowling and her aunt. (for yoga book)

Someone told me (after I introduced myself) that he had always loved my book and had hoped to meet me someday. (also yoga book)

Someone told me he was taking Amrit (formal Sikh initiation or baptism) because of my Sikhism book. (I wrote the book to explain Sikhism to non-Sikhs.)

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Gravity
02-25-2014, 11:26 PM
Instead, the margin note read, "This is why I became an editor."

Damn, James, that gave ME chills.

Animad345
02-25-2014, 11:51 PM
I was chatting with a friend at school. She's the first person I sent half my manuscript to, sans my sister. As we talked, she said things such as "Oh, I loved that moment" and "I like the protagonist" and "I didn't like that character"; she spoke about it as though it was an actual, published novel and then told me I had to send her the rest when I was finished with it.

Left me with a glow for the rest of the day.

ishtar'sgate
02-25-2014, 11:55 PM
I was just curious. What was the best compliment you ever received on anything you had written?

The best compliment I received was from a mother who said her son had lost interest in reading and actually hated it but after reading my novel in school he wanted to read again.

RedWombat
02-26-2014, 01:41 AM
Being a children's book author, I get some great ones from parents--"My daughter's not a reader, and I never thought she would read for fun, and then I caught her with a flashlight under the sheets with your book."

I had a very touching one from a carer who worked with an autistic young man, and she said that he loved my books and they were able to use reading them as a reward and it had made a huge difference in his care that year. That one I sent to my editor and my agent, and they sent him an advance reading copy of the next book.

...I also had one from a father of an extremely ill child who said that they'd been a great distraction during treatment, and jesus, I still get choked up even thinking about that one. (The implication was that things, err, weren't gonna work out okay.) I responded to the e-mail but I had to go cry for a few minutes beforehand.

I am in the habit of thinking of my work as fun, fluffy reading, and I forget sometimes that fun and fluffy is sometimes very important when somebody needs it.

Siri Kirpal
02-26-2014, 03:27 AM
Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

Oh, wow, Red Wombat! Some things go beyond compliments. Very moving!

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal

Giant Baby
02-26-2014, 04:50 AM
What was the best compliment you ever received on anything you had written?

"We'd like to publish your books" was up there. :e2headban

(Okay, technically, the agent got the fun end of that one, but it sounded pretty good second-hand.)

Giant Baby
02-26-2014, 05:08 AM
Oh, and I once overheard my aunt asking my mother if she knew anything about my then-WIP. She'd apparently peeked over my shoulder and seen me type, "Shut the fuck up!"

"Well!" exclaimed Mum. "She'll never get THAT into the school libraries."

Most touching thing my conservative (and generally dubious) mother ever said about my writing. She skipped right past the hot floods of agent and editor rejections still to come before any school librarian could ever disapprove of my books. :tongue

Susie
02-26-2014, 06:30 AM
When someone wrote that what I had written made a big difference in their life in a good way.

LeslieB
02-26-2014, 12:40 PM
For me, it's a three way tie.

1 - A very good friend told me my writing reminded her of her favorite author. Who turned out to be Lois Bujold.

2 - My fanfic 'novel' is the first one listed on the TV Tropes page for my fandom.

3 - I have received a number of emails from people who read my fanfic asking if I was actually a pro hiding behind a pseudonym.

Jamesaritchie
02-26-2014, 06:44 PM
An avid reader who will read books into the early hours of the morning if it's good did the same with mine and wanted to know if I was going to do a sequel.


.

A reviewer at some site, I can't remember if it was The New York Review of Books, or Publishers Weekly, or where, said that one of my books was "worthy of a sequel."

Nice compliment, but my editor called when this review appeared, and pretty much demanded a sequel, all because of that review. I didn't want to write a sequel, but I let the flattery, and the advance, go to my head, and wrote it anyway.

I still wish the reviewer hadn't said that.

Maggie Maxwell
02-26-2014, 06:49 PM
For me, it's a three way tie.

1 - A very good friend told me my writing reminded her of her favorite author. Who turned out to be Lois Bujold.

2 - My fanfic 'novel' is the first one listed on the TV Tropes page for my fandom.

3 - I have received a number of emails from people who read my fanfic asking if I was actually a pro hiding behind a pseudonym.

...Yeah, okay, I love my husband and undoubtly got confidence from his enjoyment, but this post reminded me. The actual best compliment I've gotten: "With your permission, I'd like to do a panel at [her state's largest anime convention] on your Mary Sues and character creation manual." She did it. I have no idea how well it went down, but...there was a panel. At a convention. About my work. :e2thud:

Toothpaste
02-26-2014, 06:55 PM
A parent came up to me and told me that my first book (ALEX) was the only book to have ever gotten her son to put down the video games and read on his own. Probably the best compliment I've ever gotten.

Second best, an email from a reader (re: OUTCAST):

"i was very angry, mostly because i was heart broken, it felt you had ripped my heart out from within my chest using your bare hands and then proceeded to stomp on it multiple times so that it was nothing more than mush.
Now i'm not saying this is a bad thing, it's entirely opposite as in my opinion a book isn't a good book unless it leaves you wanting to burn it."

:)

KMTolan
02-26-2014, 11:53 PM
Best compliment was from a young lady concerning my Dancer series. The protagonist is female. I'm not. The comment made by the reader was that I was "invisible" as a male author. Nailed it.

Kerry

LOTLOF
02-27-2014, 01:18 AM
Best compliment was from a young lady concerning my Dancer series. The protagonist is female. I'm not. The comment made by the reader was that I was "invisible" as a male author. Nailed it.

Kerry

I once got a review for one of my fanfiction stories. It was about a chapter with a romance scene told from a female character's POV.

The review: 'How the hell was this written by man?'

To this day I am not sure it was a compliment or not.

Renee J
02-27-2014, 01:51 AM
When I wrote fanfic about ten years ago, I got a review that started with, "Wow. This is actually good." It became my favorite review.

KMTolan
02-27-2014, 02:41 AM
I once got a review for one of my fanfiction stories. It was about a chapter with a romance scene told from a female character's POV.

The review: 'How the hell was this written by man?'

To this day I am not sure it was a compliment or not.

A huge compliment. You only have to see the bad examples by our male peers in this POV to realize the difference. Well done!

Kerry

layzerphish
02-27-2014, 12:11 PM
"You should be a writer"

Blissfully ignorant, but still flattering

cmi0616
02-27-2014, 10:58 PM
A professor of mine said she was moved to tears by something I wrote once. Especially because I had an enormous amount of respect for said professor, I've always been proud of that compliment.

UndergoingMitosis
02-28-2014, 12:13 AM
Freshman year of college, I had to take freshman writing seminar with everybody else. I was a science major who had never really thought of herself as a good writer--and honestly, I complained about having to take the class at all.

Well, we had to write a paper on identity, very standard freshman seminar things. I wrote about not knowing who I was or what I wanted to do because I was 18 and that's pretty much what I did.

At the end of the essay, just in really big letters with underlinings and all that jazz, my professor wrote "You are a writer."

I pull it out every once in a while when I need a reminder.

AndreaGS
03-01-2014, 04:30 AM
When one of my beta readers tried to ship a couple of my characters (it's the first of a planned trilogy). It was flattering that they felt real enough that she thought these two would be JUST RIGHT for each other.

Sadly one of those characters dies in book 2. I didn't tell her. ;)

blacbird
03-01-2014, 08:11 AM
When one of my beta readers tried to ship a couple of my characters

"To ship"? My ignorant understanding of this verb is that it means to send something somewhere. In the context of your comment, what does it mean?

caw

AndreaGS
03-01-2014, 09:07 AM
"To ship"? My ignorant understanding of this verb is that it means to send something somewhere. In the context of your comment, what does it mean?

caw


Wanting to see two characters in a romantic relationship and feeling emotionally invested in that outcome:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipping_(fandom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipping_(fandom))

:)

thedark
03-01-2014, 09:17 AM
Wanting to see two characters in a romantic relationship and feeling emotionally invested in that outcome:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipping_(fandom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipping_(fandom))

:)

Just fixing your link. :) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipping_(fandom)

blacbird
03-01-2014, 09:25 AM
Wanting to see two characters in a romantic relationship and feeling emotionally invested in that outcome:


Thanks for the explanation. But there is a tiny lesson here: Be ye wary of trendy jargon. Don't blithely assume that everybody knows a thing like this. I've already received one PM thanking me for asking the question, from somebody else who didn't know this, either.

caw

thedark
03-01-2014, 09:39 AM
Thanks for the explanation. But there is a tiny lesson here: Be ye wary of trendy jargon. Don't blithely assume that everybody knows a thing like this. I've already received one PM thanking me for asking the question, from somebody else who didn't know this, either.

caw

I just cheerfully assumed Andrea had made a serious typo. :)

AndreaGS
03-01-2014, 10:55 AM
I just cheerfully assumed Andrea had made a serious typo. :)

Ha! Yeah, didn't even think about it--it does look very odd without awareness of the term.

LeslieB
03-01-2014, 08:37 PM
Thanks for the explanation. But there is a tiny lesson here: Be ye wary of trendy jargon. Don't blithely assume that everybody knows a thing like this. I've already received one PM thanking me for asking the question, from somebody else who didn't know this, either.

caw

In Andrea's defense, the terms 'shipping' and 'shippers' (i.e., people who get into the relationships of a show/book/etc.) have been around for a very long time. I've even seen them used on TV shows. And let's face it, 99% of the publishing terms that get used on this board would be considered jargon to anyone new. Isn't learning new things part of writing?

Lady Chipmunk
03-01-2014, 09:47 PM
Is it bad that I now want to write a story about someone trying to ship (as in send away) fictional characters? Maybe on the Good Ship Lollypop.

reiver33
03-02-2014, 03:22 AM
From a review;

"So, yeah, My Gun Sleeps Alone is a cross between 1950s noir and urban fantasy. But much like peanut butter and chocolate, these two elements seem to go well together, at least in the capable hands of Martin Clark."

'Capable hands' - yeah, I'll settle for that...

quicklime
03-04-2014, 07:17 PM
Both my wife and a good friend wanted to know how much man-whoring I did at conferences after a short story I wrote just because of the character's apparent believability....

TellMeAStory
03-04-2014, 07:43 PM
I did a first-person Fatal Attraction-like piece, and my husband said in a very small voice, "That IS fiction, isn't it?"

NateSean
03-04-2014, 07:59 PM
Someone once praised a line in a short story I wrote. They told me how it drew them in and made the world real to them.

In that same vein, someone once told me how the high level of surveillance I depicted in another short story made them want to vomit. It wasn't a malicious comment, just a genuine emotional reaction and I was ecstatic.

guttersquid
03-06-2014, 10:36 PM
If forced to narrow it down, I'd have to say my biggest compliment was that the first story I ever wrote got accepted for publication. The publisher said, "At first I was skeptical. I'd never seen a story written like this. But it was so funny and touching, I couldn't resist. Do you have any others?"

I wrote two more, and all three were published.

Note: The stories are written with nothing but dialogue. No narration. No exposition. Nothing. Not even dialogue tags. Just two people talking. I admit it was an experiment on my part. I just wanted to see if it could be done. I also admit I was shocked to have it accepted.

elinor
03-07-2014, 04:31 AM
For me it was that my UF police procedural reminded him of the Dresden Files and he had to bring it into the bathroom with him because he didn't want to put it down.

Alienmermaid
03-25-2014, 03:55 AM
An editor told me there was a plot twist they didn't see coming: made me feel good. Yeah, and my story made them think of White Rabbit; gotta love Jefferson Airplane, down the rabbit hole is best reaction I've gotten from my science fiction.:)

Filigree
03-25-2014, 07:54 AM
My first favorite comment came attached to my first coherent, completed fantasy story, handed in to my college English prof in a rush just before term ended. I got back an A+, and the note "You might make money at this someday."

My second came from the beta reader who said of my early fan fiction: "You write such sweet, silly fluff. I bet you couldn't write something dark and grim, like a deathstory." When I wrote twelve or thirteen of them in quick succession, she said: "Wow, I sure called that wrong. How the hell can you make me smile through my tears, anyway?"

My third came from the senior editor of a Big Five fantasy imprint, who said a novel I'd submitted for a contest had 'brilliant worldbuilding'. It got third place out of 750+ entries. Four years later, it's trunked and under revision - but still in the game.

My fourth is the acceptance letter for my debut erotic romance space opera, followed closely by its good reviews.

Jamiekswriter
03-25-2014, 08:46 PM
I had a librarian come up to me at a conference to thank me for my book that I donated to her for an auction. She said that the winner of the raffle wasn't a reader. But she read my romantic suspense novel and then every other book in her prize basket, and now she comes into the library all the time because she just can't get enough.

Ellis Clover
03-26-2014, 07:58 AM
This will sound very braggy, especially because I'm a fairly crap writer (much more crap than I used to think I was), but my writing tutor at Uni once said my writing style reminded her of David Malouf. (For non-Aussies, he's one of our most successful novelists who has been shortlisted for the Booker and has won many other international awards.) Sometimes, actually, remembering that compliment is where I find the motivation to keep writing.