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AdamNeymars
01-31-2014, 11:30 AM
Who are these authors? Are they writing in your fiction genre? What can we learn about their genre covers, blurbs, book descriptions and pricing that might help us in our publishing journey?

triceretops
01-31-2014, 11:33 AM
Well, you can find out a lot about them on the Kindle Boards. In particular, inside the thread The Writers Cafe. Just saying. But I do frequent it to pick up on any of their new, innovative promo techniques. I've learned a few things over there.

tri

AdamNeymars
02-04-2014, 11:28 AM
Here are some authors

Georgia Cates (romance)
Bella Forest (paranormal)
H.W. Ward (romance)
J.S. Cooper (romance)
Mariana Zapata (romance)
Mia Sheridan (romance)
R.J. Lewis (romance)
A.G. Riddle (sci fi)
Christopher Nuttall (sci fi)
Hugh Howey (sci fi)
Bella Aurora (Mystery & Suspense)
M. Leighton (romance)
M. Malone (romance)

bearilou
02-04-2014, 03:32 PM
Good questions, Adam. What are your thoughts on the matter?

Also, Blake Russell Russell Blake, Suspense (I think I got his name right this time). Didn't he just score a big thing to write with Cussler?

Parametric
02-04-2014, 03:48 PM
Russell Blake. :)

Old Hack
02-04-2014, 03:51 PM
Who are these authors? Are they writing in your fiction genre? What can we learn about their genre covers, blurbs, book descriptions and pricing that might help us in our publishing journey?

You're asking some really broad questions there, many of which can be answered through common-sense.

For example, it stands to reason that a good, professional-looking, eye-catching cover, and a sharp, well-written blurb is going to help sell more copies than slapdash, amateurish Photoshop attempts and typo-ridden copy would.

You can check this by looking at the best-selling titles on Amazon etc. It's easy.

Pricing is another matter: there has been a lot of research over the years about how best to price things, books included. I was involved with a big research project which looked at pricing in the late 1980s: I bet you could find some appropriate papers through Google Scholar if you looked. And I know there's a lot of helpful information about pricing in our self-publishing diary threads here, too.

bearilou
02-04-2014, 04:33 PM
Russell Blake. :)

:gaah

Thanks. I'll fix that right now.

I was so sure I had it right. *shamefaced*

edit: fixed with apologies to Russell Blake. :/

bearilou
02-05-2014, 05:50 PM
You're asking some really broad questions there, many of which can be answered through common-sense.

Which was why I was kind of hoping for a spirited discussion, lead off by Adam's ideas/opinions as a touchstone. But given his propensity for driveby thread starting and not showing up for days after, and certainly no further discussion except to drop more links/lists on us...meh.

I'll have the conversation with myself, I guess.

:D

jjdebenedictis
02-06-2014, 01:00 AM
I'll have the conversation with myself, I guess.

:DThat would be me, right? Since we share a brain? :D

Heck, let's just shoot the breeze about any ol' random topic, since we're talking to ourselves. So--what d'you think ever happened to KatyPerryfan19?

bearilou
02-06-2014, 04:53 PM
That would be me, right? Since we share a brain? :D

If we pitch our voices differently, we should be able to keep up with who is saying what and actually pull it off!


Heck, let's just shoot the breeze about any ol' random topic, since we're talking to ourselves. So--what d'you think ever happened to KatyPerryfan19?

:ROFL:


What can we learn about their genre covers, blurbs, book descriptions and pricing that might help us in our publishing journey?

To try to keep this relevant (too laaatee!) honestly, the only take always I have when examining the successful author-publishers efforts is that it's imperative that you have a team of people to work with you. If writing blurbs is not your strong suit, get someone who is to help. Research book cover designers and put out quality money for a quality book. As there are different kinds of editors out there, it might actually behoove the author-publisher to invest in at least a couple of them instead of just one (whichever version they use).

Mostly, I think successful author-publishers realize that writing is an art, publishing is a business. When the book is finished and the writer has done all they can to make that sucker the best it is, they need to take off their writer hat, put on their publisher hat and go at it. Edit, polish further, blurbs and descriptions done to a professional level, covers that are genius.

And study study study what the big people are doing and emulate the success you want to see.

Ever since Russell Blake's story came out about co-writing with Clive Cussler (and I botched his name earlier in this thread), I've been reading more about him. He is having the kind of success I'd like one day so it's his business model that I'm going to rip into and see the guts of what he's doing, use what I can, take the principles and apply them to my situation and my plans.

Which I think is key. None of this analyzation really amounts to much until I know exactly what it is that I want to achieve. If I don't have that clear picture first, then what I do won't have the same impact.

Barbara R.
02-06-2014, 05:04 PM
Who are these authors? Are they writing in your fiction genre? What can we learn about their genre covers, blurbs, book descriptions and pricing that might help us in our publishing journey?

According to a very interesting experiment, targeting specific sub-genres has a great deal to do with self-publishing success, along with cover art and savvy use of tag words on Amazon. The writer in question published a "first novel" under a pseudonym and it debuted at the top of that genre's list. You can read about it here (http://barbararogan.com/blog/?p=777).

Old Hack
02-06-2014, 05:24 PM
I think Amazon has disabled its tagging feature now, Barbara: might you be referring to key words, used in the book's description? Just a thought.

Inky
02-06-2014, 06:02 PM
It IS hard work. And, there's always someone patting you on the shoulder with suggestions and encouragement; someone always tearing you down. Somehow, you figure out how to walk right down the middle--tiptoe.

But, when you check your stats, and you're on the same page as big name authors, there's this moment...gawking, tearing up, laughing, fist-pumping--it's overwhelming.

Then to go from top 100, to top 20...

I thank Indie movies. They've been so successful, people are now more accepting of Indie authors, whereas, 'Self Publishing' used to be a dirty word coughed into a fist.
And, always, you're learning, perfecting, learning, studying...

What many forget is that we DON'T have the big name publishers with their handy STAFF. No copy editors, no cover artists. Sure, some covers are cheesy, but it's what's inside that should be considered--difficult, because the cover is what gravitates you to the book in the first place.
Personally, I think, no matter how many times we edit, there's always gonna be that bloody glitch that gets away from us.
My first blunder was Chaper Two.
Yep.
Chaper.
How many programs had my work been put through; how many times read with the naked eye, and CHAPER wasn't discovered???
*facepalm*
Bless the readers who overlooked that and still offered great reviews!! There are truly some wonderful people out there.

Barbara R.
02-06-2014, 08:49 PM
I think Amazon has disabled its tagging feature now, Barbara: might you be referring to key words, used in the book's description? Just a thought.

Yes, thank you! I knew I had it wrong when I posted, but was insufficiently caffeinated to come up with the right word.

Trapjaw
02-08-2014, 02:29 PM
According to a very interesting experiment, targeting specific sub-genres has a great deal to do with self-publishing success, along with cover art and savvy use of tag words on Amazon. The writer in question published a "first novel" under a pseudonym and it debuted at the top of that genre's list. You can read about it here (http://barbararogan.com/blog/?p=777).

That ^ is a fantastic blog entry! I wish it had been posted in my thread, as a lot of the talk about my books was about how they are difficult to fit into any specific genre. When I read this, I felt as if it were me talking.

I now feel quite inspired to pull off my own experiment like this, to write something quick, and VERY geared towards one specific genre.


It IS hard work. And, there's always someone patting you on the shoulder with suggestions and encouragement; someone always tearing you down. Somehow, you figure out how to walk right down the middle--tiptoe.

But, when you check your stats, and you're on the same page as big name authors, there's this moment...gawking, tearing up, laughing, fist-pumping--it's overwhelming.

Then to go from top 100, to top 20...

I thank Indie movies. They've been so successful, people are now more accepting of Indie authors, whereas, 'Self Publishing' used to be a dirty word coughed into a fist.
And, always, you're learning, perfecting, learning, studying...

What many forget is that we DON'T have the big name publishers with their handy STAFF. No copy editors, no cover artists. Sure, some covers are cheesy, but it's what's inside that should be considered--difficult, because the cover is what gravitates you to the book in the first place.
Personally, I think, no matter how many times we edit, there's always gonna be that bloody glitch that gets away from us.
My first blunder was Chaper Two.
Yep.
Chaper.
How many programs had my work been put through; how many times read with the naked eye, and CHAPER wasn't discovered???
*facepalm*
Bless the readers who overlooked that and still offered great reviews!! There are truly some wonderful people out there.

Lord knows it's hard, hard work. And yes, no matter how good you *think* you've got it... Someone is going to come at you with fresh criticisms. Which is a great thing - being kept on our toes keeps us sharp, keeps us striving for improvement.

And yes, there will always be the typo that evades your eyes (and those of others, often enough) even after 20 edits! Don't feel too bad about it - I've found typos in trade published books too (not often, mind you... But it happens from time to time!)

Barbara R.
02-08-2014, 07:55 PM
That ^ is a fantastic blog entry! I wish it had been posted in my thread, as a lot of the talk about my books was about how they are difficult to fit into any specific genre. When I read this, I felt as if it were me talking.

I now feel quite inspired to pull off my own experiment like this, to write something quick, and VERY geared towards one specific genre.

Glad you found it interesting; I did too. Let us know how your experiment pans out.

benluby
02-08-2014, 10:16 PM
Sadly, the cover is the first step, well, after the blurb, so that people will actually SEE the cover when they search for a specific genre. Then of course, you have the chosen...those lucky/popular ones that stand at the top, easily seen and, for the readers seeking nearly instant gratification, they probably won't bother scrolling through several more book covers to find another.
So, lots of factors to consider. Blurb, cover, and a good snapshot. Otherwise, you might have a sale a month, regardless of how well your story is written.