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OldYAGuy
01-15-2014, 06:51 PM
I’m a newbie in a larger agency and have been with them for five months. I handed in my second set of revision suggestions in early December. A few questions:
Should I be concerned if my agent wants a “few more tweaks” before sending it out?
In your experience, do agents ever ask for more revision as a way to forestall telling their client they aren’t having luck with publishers?
I’m a newbie, and, yes, I’m impatient, but realistically, how long should a client wait before considering another agent?

Ferret
01-15-2014, 07:25 PM
It's not uncommon for a manuscript to go through several rounds of revision before being sent out. Some agents do this regularly. I don't think it means the agent has been having trouble with publishers, especially since it doesn't sound like the manuscript has even been pitched to publishers yet. I think considering another agent at this stage would be very premature, not to mention unfair to the agent who has already put in some work on your manuscript.

I understand being anxious, but try to relax. It hasn't been that long, and publishing moves slowly.

Also, don't be afraid to talk to your agent if you have questions about the process and the timeline.

amergina
01-15-2014, 07:30 PM
I’m a newbie in a larger agency and have been with them for five months. I handed in my second set of revision suggestions in early December. A few questions:
Should I be concerned if my agent wants a “few more tweaks” before sending it out?

No...though you *can* also say no, if you feel that a few more tweaks aren't worth it and have a good reason why they aren't. It's a partnership.

It also depends on how editorial your agent is. Mine is fairly editorial and she's often right about the edits.


In your experience, do agents ever ask for more revision as a way to forestall telling their client they aren’t having luck with publishers?

Not that I've heard. Agents want to make money, ultimately. It's a business. They wouldn't waste their time if they didn't see something in your writing that was salable.


I’m a newbie, and, yes, I’m impatient, but realistically, how long should a client wait before considering another agent?

Publishing can be a slow slog. If I were you, I'd at *least* wait until the novel was out on submission and see how that goes.

Also--talk to your agent. Don't stew over this stuff in private. Voice your concerns.

Barbara R.
01-15-2014, 07:31 PM
I’m a newbie in a larger agency and have been with them for five months. I handed in my second set of revision suggestions in early December. A few questions:
Should I be concerned if my agent wants a “few more tweaks” before sending it out?
Agents want to go out with the strongest possible ms. If they ask for additional tweaks and you agree they're needed, that's good-- you're on the same page.

In your experience, do agents ever ask for more revision as a way to forestall telling their client they aren’t having luck with publishers?

If you're still revising the book, they're not yet submitting it; so this question doesn't make sense to me. Generally speaking, the more an agent invests in a project (including time spent editing and communicating with writer) the more invested he/she feels.

I’m a newbie, and, yes, I’m impatient, but realistically, how long should a client wait before considering another agent?

But this agent hasn't even submitted yet, has he? And you're already thinking of a change? Seems to me you need better communication with the agent. Give him/her a month or six weeks to read before asking for feedback on the revisions. Once you've got a ms. the agent feels is salable, the fun begins. Ask the agent who he plans to submit to and ask him to keep you informed of submissions and responses. Expect to wait at least a month, often two or more, to get the publisher's response. Everyone's backed up, and a first novel (if that's what that is) is not their top priority--at least, not till they've read and fallen in love with it. Some agents won't push for an answer until they've had an offer from someone, at which point they contact all publishers still considering the work and ask for a response within days.

And read up on this forum. I think you'll find lots of useful info for newbies. Good luck!

goddessofgliese
01-15-2014, 09:51 PM
In your experience, do agents ever ask for more revision as a way to forestall telling their client they aren’t having luck with publishers?

Why would they do that? If they can't sell it, they will tell you instead of spending more time on your project.

While you wait, just write the next book.

wampuscat
01-15-2014, 10:35 PM
Do you not agree with the recommended tweaks? It sounds like your agent hasn't sent the book to publishers yet because he/she didn't feel it was ready yet. If you disagree, that's an important discussion to have.

I'm also inexperienced, but I don't see any point in having an author continue to tweak a book if the agent didn't think it could be successful. That would be as much of a waste of the agent's time as the writer's, and it would slow the writer from progressing on new work that could be sold.

If I remember correctly, you went from full requests to agented fairly quickly. Not saying it can't happen again when you go on sub, but you might want to be prepared for a longer wait.

Putputt
01-15-2014, 11:20 PM
I’m a newbie in a larger agency and have been with them for five months. I handed in my second set of revision suggestions in early December. A few questions:
Should I be concerned if my agent wants a “few more tweaks” before sending it out?

Do you agree with your agent's edits? I don't think you should be concerned...five months might seem like a long time, but if your agent is coming back with good edits, I think it's worth the wait to get the MS in perfect shape before sending it out.



In your experience, do agents ever ask for more revision as a way to forestall telling their client they aren’t having luck with publishers?

I've never heard of this happening. I'm pretty sure agents would let their clients know before subbing to publishers.



I’m a newbie, and, yes, I’m impatient, but realistically, how long should a client wait before considering another agent?

It sounds like you need to talk to your agent. I'm confused because it seems like you think your agent has submitted to publishers...has the agent subbed to pubs yet?

Quickbread
01-15-2014, 11:33 PM
Patience takes on a whole new meaning in publishing. I'm a newbie at my agency, too, and I'm on round three of an outline for a rewrite. I've been outlining, submitting, and making changes based on agent feedback since mid-November. Based on all the changes I've made to the story, my manuscript probably won't go out until the end of the year. My agent is highly editorial, so it's not uncommon for her to work with a writer for a year or so before pitching. But then again, she works with a lot of debut authors. Any good agent is invested in what will likely be a long process, regardless of how few or many edit rounds are needed.

It sounds like your relationship with the agent is productive in the sense that things are steadily moving forward, even if it feels slow. I'd give it much more time and just expect at least some small tweaks, so you can be surprised if there are none. If you trust the agent and agree with their insights about your manuscript and the market, there's not much more to do but the work that needs to be done.

And starting to think about the next book so you don't go totally crazy in the in-between times.

OldYAGuy
01-16-2014, 06:16 AM
Think I'll change my handle to DumbOldYAGuy. All of you folks are spot-on with the advice, and I thank you for it. Yes, I feel the revisions have made the book better. Yes, I'm getting multiple points of view from readers within the agency. Yes, I'm just being too @%$& impatient. I'll just keep plotting out the next novel while I wait. Thanks again for talking me out of a minor funk. I needed it.

wampuscat
01-16-2014, 07:59 PM
Think I'll change my handle to DumbOldYAGuy. All of you folks are spot-on with the advice, and I thank you for it. Yes, I feel the revisions have made the book better. Yes, I'm getting multiple points of view from readers within the agency. Yes, I'm just being too @%$& impatient. I'll just keep plotting out the next novel while I wait. Thanks again for talking me out of a minor funk. I needed it.

Don't be silly! We all get anxious about stuff. (At least I hope we all do. Maybe it's just me! :))

TerryRodgers
01-16-2014, 11:58 PM
Think I'll change my handle to DumbOldYAGuy. All of you folks are spot-on with the advice, and I thank you for it. Yes, I feel the revisions have made the book better. Yes, I'm getting multiple points of view from readers within the agency. Yes, I'm just being too @%$& impatient. I'll just keep plotting out the next novel while I wait. Thanks again for talking me out of a minor funk. I needed it.

Plot it and start writing it. It could be another 6 months before he/she starts submitting. You could finish the next novel or close to it. And once it's submitted, keep on writing because it's not uncommon for the process to take 6 months or more. You got through the very stressful part, finding an agent. Now, just keep on writing and submitting.

OldYAGuy
01-17-2014, 05:11 AM
Thanks, also, to wampuscat and TerryR. God, I'm a dork. My agent just checked in today to say we're just a few more tweaks away from "going out" with it. Says she's excited, too.
Just needed to get some patience for Christmas, which I didn't.
And, yes, Terry, I'll jump right into the writing after I wrap up my plot line.
Good luck to all of you on your own projects!

Quickbread
01-17-2014, 08:51 PM
You should come on over to The Next Circle of Hell (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93652&page=924). It's a long thread, but so incredibly informative and sanity-making to read through people's first (and subsequent) agent and publishing experiences. It'll help you feel much better. And it's warm there. :D