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GigiF
01-13-2014, 08:37 PM
Apologies if this has been answered a hundred times already - I can't seem to find a straight answer amongst the plethora of resource and information...

Do people attach a digital version of their entire MS with a QL or just offer to send it if asked?

Thanks.

eoficon
01-13-2014, 08:44 PM
The straight answer is.
It depends.
Read the submission guidelines. And do exactly what they say.
I've heard though, if there are no clear guidelines, and there usually always are if you look hard enough, it doesn't hurt to include a few chapter/pages at the bottom.

beckethm
01-13-2014, 08:46 PM
Send whatever the agent asks for. In most cases, this will be your first five or ten pages, pasted into the body of the email.

Most agents will delete emails that contain unsolicited attachments.

Do check the agent's submission guidelines, however, because there are a handful that ask for pages or chapters as an attachment.

Ephiny0
01-13-2014, 10:16 PM
Don't attach anything unless it's specifically asked for. I don't think you need to even offer to send the manuscript - if they want to see it, they'll ask.

ReflectiveAcuity
01-14-2014, 02:09 AM
Do people attach a digital version of their entire MS with a QL or just offer to send it if asked?

I might be repeating what others have written, but from everything I've studied so far the answer is...

Do your homework about the literary agent you plan on sending a query to. They all have a different set of rules. Every agent has guidelines posted on their website. If there are no guidelines (extremely rare), then send ONLY the query.

And don't "offer" to send anything in your query.

"I would be happy to send you a partial or full at your request." No.

If they want something, they will ask for it.

GigiF
01-14-2014, 12:18 PM
Great. Thanks for the answers. I've gone through the guidelines a couple of times and become lost in the sea of information. Sounds like I need to try again and really try and find my way through.

:)

playground
01-15-2014, 05:19 AM
I might be repeating what others have written, but from everything I've studied so far the answer is...

Do your homework about the literary agent you plan on sending a query to. They all have a different set of rules. Every agent has guidelines posted on their website. If there are no guidelines (extremely rare), then send ONLY the query.

And don't "offer" to send anything in your query.

"I would be happy to send you a partial or full at your request." No.

If they want something, they will ask for it.


I never understood the hard set rule of not suggesting to send a full. Like, I don't see the big deal? The agents are people too, they aren't god. I feel there is nothing wrong with saying you'd love to send them your full manuscript. It's harmless. But alas, however the saying goes, everyone has opinions, yada yada yada, butts.

Bron
01-17-2014, 06:03 AM
I never understood the hard set rule of not suggesting to send a full. Like, I don't see the big deal? The agents are people too, they aren't god. I feel there is nothing wrong with saying you'd love to send them your full manuscript. It's harmless. But alas, however the saying goes, everyone has opinions, yada yada yada, butts.

I think the reason behind this rule/advice is because query letters are short and every word needs to pull its weight. You wouldn't be querying if you didn't have material to send the agent so there's no need to state this explicitly. I don't think agents will blacklist anyone who does offer, and any agent that does is probably not someone with whom you want to work, but the words you use offering could be better used to strengthen your query elsewhere.

elinor
01-17-2014, 06:17 AM
If it is not specified whether to send part of your manuscript or not, I would leave it out. Just send the query. Normally I believe Agents are careful about specifying exactly what they want you to send. Most cases I've seen is that if it is asked for, you paste content into the body of the email - attachments just mean they will chuck it and send a form reject. Just takes a little bit of time reading around - but they should always clearly state somewhere exactly what they want you to send.

playground
01-18-2014, 11:54 PM
I think the reason behind this rule/advice is because query letters are short and every word needs to pull its weight. You wouldn't be querying if you didn't have material to send the agent so there's no need to state this explicitly. I don't think agents will blacklist anyone who does offer, and any agent that does is probably not someone with whom you want to work, but the words you use offering could be better used to strengthen your query elsewhere.


Hmm I guess. I mean I am not trying to argue or be a jerk, I just know I put one small sentence at the very end right after my small paragraph about me. I guess I just don't think agents care too much if you are over 250 words by a tad. Now there is an obvious difference between 275 words compared to 800 words.

Drachen Jager
01-19-2014, 12:05 AM
Read the submission guidelines!

Some agents say do not submit manuscript material period. Some request 5 or 10 pages, and some just want the whole thing up front (those are very rare though, I only know of one).

Some want a synopsis with the query, some want a biography with the query.

Read the guidelines and submit what they want to see.

Also, this doesn't belong in QLH.

Calla Lily
01-19-2014, 12:12 AM
Moving to Ask The Agent. Buckle up.


ETA: All set. You may now move about the cabin.

Old Hack
01-19-2014, 12:37 AM
Great. Thanks for the answers. I've gone through the guidelines a couple of times and become lost in the sea of information. Sounds like I need to try again and really try and find my way through.

:)

Just remember that one agent's guidelines won't apply to another agent or agency.

Follow the guidelines for each separate agent or agency you query. Follow them to the letter. If they don't specify whether you can send pages or not, then you could send the first five pages of your ms, posted into your query email. DO NOT send your entire ms, and do not include attachments unless the agent specifically asks for them, as either will probably result in an instant rejection.


I never understood the hard set rule of not suggesting to send a full. Like, I don't see the big deal? The agents are people too, they aren't god. I feel there is nothing wrong with saying you'd love to send them your full manuscript. It's harmless. But alas, however the saying goes, everyone has opinions, yada yada yada, butts.

It's not harmless. It takes the focus away from the meat of your query and it's pointless, too, as if you're querying the agent it's obvious that you'd like them to read your full. Why waste the words when you could put them to more effective use?

playground
01-19-2014, 05:30 AM
Just remember that one agent's guidelines won't apply to another agent or agency.

Follow the guidelines for each separate agent or agency you query. Follow them to the letter. If they don't specify whether you can send pages or not, then you could send the first five pages of your ms, posted into your query email. DO NOT send your entire ms, and do not include attachments unless the agent specifically asks for them, as either will probably result in an instant rejection.



It's not harmless. It takes the focus away from the meat of your query and it's pointless, too, as if you're querying the agent it's obvious that you'd like them to read your full. Why waste the words when you could put them to more effective use?


I just don't see how you are wasting them though. If it is the last line, right after you do your paragraph or so about yourself, and that is literally the last thing, I don't see the problem. If you really felt you could use an extra sentence in your query then use it. Just because you use the sentence to say "I would love to send you my manuscript" or something, shouldn't be the crux of whether or not you need an extra line to strengthen your query. I don't know, it looks like I am the only one that feels this way, so no big deal, I just feel while it is implied you want to send the manuscript I feel there is nothing wrong with it at the same time. I guess I just see it in the same light as when it is said you should tell the agent why you are querying them (i.e. they sell similar books, same market, etc.) To me that is the same logic, as it is implied why you are querying them: you feel they can sell your book.

Ehh I just never saw this "rule" as a good one. But alas, no worries, different opinions.

Jamesaritchie
01-19-2014, 06:24 AM
I never understood the hard set rule of not suggesting to send a full. Like, I don't see the big deal? The agents are people too, they aren't god. I feel there is nothing wrong with saying you'd love to send them your full manuscript. It's harmless. But alas, however the saying goes, everyone has opinions, yada yada yada, butts.

They already know you want to send the full manuscript, or you wouldn't be querying them. It's not that there's anything wrong with suggesting it, but it's completely unnecessary, and will make any agent say, "Well, duh."

Really, why else would you be querying? You feel they can sell your book? This gets another "Duh", and a second why else would you be querying them?

Jamesaritchie
01-19-2014, 06:28 AM
Apologies if this has been answered a hundred times already - I can't seem to find a straight answer amongst the plethora of resource and information...

Do people attach a digital version of their entire MS with a QL or just offer to send it if asked?

Thanks.

A query is what you send when you are not sending a manuscript. A cover letter is what you send with the manuscript. Never send a manuscript until asked.

It almost always fine to send your first three to five pages, but no more than this. Do not send whole chapters unless specifically asked to do so.