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Katana
01-12-2014, 07:20 AM
Greetings!

My English MC encounters a nasty woman, and he calls her a twat under his breath. A google search indicates this is something one would probably use to insult a man. I don't want to use the c*** word, so I'm wondering if twat would work, or if there is a better (mildly offensive) name to call her. Thank you.

Amadan
01-12-2014, 07:24 AM
Bint (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bint)?

KellyAssauer
01-12-2014, 07:31 AM
French

Hanson
01-12-2014, 07:41 AM
'Wife'

ClareGreen
01-12-2014, 07:46 AM
My English MC encounters a nasty woman, and he calls her a twat under his breath. A google search indicates this is something one would probably use to insult a man. I don't want to use the c*** word, so I'm wondering if twat would work, or if there is a better (mildly offensive) name to call her. Thank you.

Two questions:

1) What has she done to offend him?

2) Where in England is he from?

Helix
01-12-2014, 07:55 AM
You'll also need to consider (if you haven't already) how your male MC's choice of words will shape him for the reader.

Katana
01-12-2014, 08:36 AM
You'll also need to consider (if you haven't already) how your male MC's choice of words will shape him for the reader.


Two questions:

1) What has she done to offend him?

2) Where in England is he from?

Hmm, I'll try to give more info, but this will be tough to describe. He's upper class from Southern England, and I'm trying to keep him polite. He's taken aback by a particularly rude, abrupt woman. His saying something a little off-colour takes others by surprise and they burst out laughing because it's so not in keeping with his character.

The woman is rude and dismissive of him, much the way one might be rude and dismissive of a sales clerk.

Katana
01-12-2014, 08:42 AM
French :ROFL:

crunchyblanket
01-12-2014, 01:16 PM
Hmm, I'll try to give more info, but this will be tough to describe. He's upper class from Southern England, and I'm trying to keep him polite. He's taken aback by a particularly rude, abrupt woman. His saying something a little off-colour takes others by surprise and they burst out laughing because it's so not in keeping with his character.

The woman is rude and dismissive of him, much the way one might be rude and dismissive of a sales clerk.

'Twat' would fit the bill here - I was going to suggest 'slag' but that's pretty particular to the working class :D

I'd go with 'stupid tart' myself - 'tart' is sort of a slightly more polite way of saying 'slag', i.e a woman of 'loose morality'.

wilchris
01-12-2014, 02:25 PM
"Bitch" or given that she's dismissive of him and he's upper class, maybe, "arrogant bitch.," or even "jumped up bitch."

AVS
01-12-2014, 02:35 PM
Upper class southern English might use something slightly archaic like harridan, or fishwife. Possibly bitch. I feel they would be unlikely to use twat.

Parametric
01-12-2014, 02:51 PM
Hmm, I'll try to give more info, but this will be tough to describe. He's upper class from Southern England, and I'm trying to keep him polite.

Consider "cow", which is a mild insult for a woman and nowhere near as offensive as "bitch" - to my ear, at least. :)

AVS
01-12-2014, 02:58 PM
Consider "cow", which is a mild insult for a woman and nowhere near as offensive as "bitch" - to my ear, at least. :)

Yep that sounds about right.

Torgo
01-12-2014, 03:03 PM
Consider "cow", which is a mild insult for a woman and nowhere near as offensive as "bitch" - to my ear, at least. :)

Yep. 'Silly cow' or indeed 'moo' or (for an older woman) 'old bag(gage)' gives you rude and insulting without being vulgar or particularly vicious.

'Bitch' has quite a lot more venom behind it. 'Twat' is vulgar/sweary enough that I couldn't use it in a novel for 7 year olds, really, but probably could use it on Doctor Who. (In the UK it's far less anatomical than the US version.)

onesecondglance
01-12-2014, 03:10 PM
I would also have suggested "silly cow", or "silly bint".

Torgo
01-12-2014, 03:14 PM
Upper class southern English might use something slightly archaic like harridan, or fishwife.

Actually, that's funnier (or 'hag', with some kind of adjective.) If we want it to be funny.

crunchyblanket
01-12-2014, 03:26 PM
'Cow' is a good one, actually. If we're going with archaic-ish terms for the funnies, may I suggest 'trollop'?

mirandashell
01-12-2014, 04:01 PM
I would also go with 'cow'. It's mild and could be funny if it's not something your character would use usually.

'Bitch' is a little too strong and 'twat' is more of a lower class thing.

Once!
01-12-2014, 06:32 PM
There's also the question of how he'd want to insult her...

Twat generally means "idiot" - someone who has done something stupid - can be used for either a woman or (more usually) a man. Unusual to use that for a woman.

Slut is usually someone promiscuous. In the same vein you could have tart, slag (particularly in London) or slapper.

Bitch has several meanings: a woman who can't be trusted, a woman who tells stories about someone (ie to bitch about someone), a woman (or sometimes a man) who is owned (ie.. "she/he is my bitch")

Bint (Arabic for "woman") is a particularly northern derogatory term.

Cow ... can mean stupid (silly cow) or bitch-like.

Harridan, fishwife, slattern, trollop if you are writing historical fiction or want to sound as if you are reading from a thesaurus.

ClareGreen
01-12-2014, 07:24 PM
Quick note: 'Bint' usually goes with 'daft' or 'silly'. It's one for stupid, brainless, or otherwise impractical, and implies that the daft bint in question is wasting whatever time you might take to listen to her.

Rufus Coppertop
01-12-2014, 07:55 PM
My three favourite contenders would be strumpet, hussy or pinchbrick.

shaldna
01-12-2014, 10:12 PM
Greetings!

My English MC encounters a nasty woman, and he calls her a twat under his breath. A google search indicates this is something one would probably use to insult a man. I don't want to use the c*** word, so I'm wondering if twat would work, or if there is a better (mildly offensive) name to call her. Thank you.

Twat is slang for female genetalia. Most often used as an insult against men.

I;m Irish, so we'd most likely have just said cunt.



Hmm, I'll try to give more info, but this will be tough to describe. He's upper class from Southern England, and I'm trying to keep him polite. He's taken aback by a particularly rude, abrupt woman. His saying something a little off-colour takes others by surprise and they burst out laughing because it's so not in keeping with his character.

The woman is rude and dismissive of him, much the way one might be rude and dismissive of a sales clerk.


Upper class southern English might use something slightly archaic like harridan, or fishwife. Possibly bitch. I feel they would be unlikely to use twat.

I love the word harridan.

Someone else suggested trollop - this is a term for a sexually promiscuous person, and so might not be appropriate for what you are looking for.

Mr Flibble
01-12-2014, 10:28 PM
Twat generally means "idiot" - someone who has done something stupid - can be used for either a woman or (more usually) a man. Unusual to use that for a woman.

Not sure about that -- it's pretty interchangeable between men and women around here (Sussex). But yes, idiot is what it is used for, though it was originally referring to female genitalia.



Bint (Arabic for "woman") is a particularly northern derogatory term. And always reminds me inescapably of Monty Python (Moistened bint...)


It does depend on how you intend to insult this woman.

Slapper (promiscuous/prostitute) is one I've heard the local posh boys use, as is "chavvy bitch" (low class lady-dog, basically). You could tack on a "stupid" in front easy enough, if you wanted.

mirandashell
01-12-2014, 10:38 PM
You have to be careful with the c-bomb though. Where I live it's deeply offensive. Anyone who says it to me gets a smack in the mouth. And I'm not one for hitting people that often. It really is offensive here. In certain circles it will get you stabbed.

Los Pollos Hermanos
01-12-2014, 10:47 PM
I used to live in Kent (the "foot" which sticks out south of London), about twenty miles from the city centre. Although not posh ;) we were quite fond of:
* Cow (mild).
* Bitch (stronger).
* Tart (not always meaning a lady of loose morals - can be generally derogatory or even, depending on how it's said, affectionate amongst friends).
* Slapper (usually meaning lady of loose morals, but we would often say things like "Oi, slapper" when trying to get a female friend's attention).
* Bint - We used to love that one!
* Scrubber (like slapper, but there would also be the connotation that she's common and has to scrub her own front step clean, rather than have a servant do it).

Based on the character, I'd go for "scrubber" or "tart" - if said with enough venom either can come across as rather unpleasant.
I currently favour "bitch", personally - although that might be Jesse Pinkman's bad influence!

Paramite Pie
01-12-2014, 11:02 PM
I would also have suggested "silly cow", or "silly bint".

'Daft bint' sounds better to my ears. It's very dismissive but not strong enough to sound too harsh/vulgar.

It's enough to make an upper class man sound a bit 'common' or 'out of character' methinks.

Of course I'm from Ireland so not an expert but someone else mentioned 'bint' is used in Kent so at least it is not exclusive to Northern England.


'Cow' is a good one, actually. If we're going with archaic-ish terms for the funnies, may I suggest 'trollop'?

Cow works well, but is 'trollop' really that archaic? If it is then it also works well as a more prudish person may not be up to date with the latest trends in slang. It shows him being out of touch.

waylander
01-12-2014, 11:03 PM
'Supercilious cow/bitch' would seem to fit.

Los Pollos Hermanos
01-13-2014, 12:06 AM
There's always "dozy mare" - but that's probably not insulting enough for this scenario. Maybe one for the future?

One of our school bus favourites was "bushpig" (I think it's originally Australian?) if we wanted to say someone - usually female - was REALLY ugly. If you want him to say she's ugly at any point I can give you more unpleasant terms than you can shake a stick at! :D (moose and minger are my top two, btw).

mirandashell
01-13-2014, 12:09 AM
What a lovely boy you were......

Los Pollos Hermanos
01-13-2014, 01:08 AM
I'm female - haha!

I'd like to point out that the faux unpleasantness occurred during my teenage years - I secured a grammar school place a fifty minute bus ride away and you know what it's like when a load of girls are confined within a small space. :evil However, a lot of the bus-based insults were affectionate. We're all still in contact and have (pub-based) reunions periodically.

Saying that, my best friend regularly addresses me as "slapper", and I'm anything but.

Ephiny0
01-13-2014, 01:35 AM
I think of 'bint' as quite a mild insult compared to most of the others here, can actually be used quite affectionately between friends, so not sure it would work in this context. I wouldn't use either of the 'female genitalia' words, as they'd be more often used towards men, in my experience.

Actually, the other day I accidentally bumped into a man in the street in a posh part of London, and he called me a bitch. Which was, you know, nice of him. But it does get used casually like that.

Los Pollos Hermanos
01-13-2014, 01:51 AM
I don't say twat, and I absolutely abhor c***. There's a couple of gangster-type characters in my book(s) who have potty mouths, and I cannot bring myself to put the latter in their speech. As for that bloke, he'll insult the wrong person one day...

shaldna
01-13-2014, 02:15 AM
You have to be careful with the c-bomb though. Where I live it's deeply offensive. Anyone who says it to me gets a smack in the mouth. And I'm not one for hitting people that often. It really is offensive here. In certain circles it will get you stabbed.

A lot of people keep telling me that. Here in Ireland it's almost a term of endearment. ie. 'silly wee cunt'. It's one of those words though that either mean everything or means nothing, especially when it comes to offence levels. Again, highlights how region can influence what's really offensive and what's not.

wendymarlowe
01-13-2014, 02:53 AM
A lot of people keep telling me that. Here in Ireland it's almost a term of endearment. ie. 'silly wee cunt'. It's one of those words though that either mean everything or means nothing, especially when it comes to offence levels. Again, highlights how region can influence what's really offensive and what's not.

Yes, this - I hardly ever swear in real life, but I do write interesting characters with potty mouths :-P That said, "cunt" is something I just can't tolerate - much worse than anything else someone could say to another person, because of the misogyny in the roots (in a way other misogynistic insults don't bother me quite as much, strangely enough). I would find a character who uses that word to be instantly unlikable, although I'm fine with my hero (and occasionally heroine) saying "fucking" all the live-long day.

mirandashell
01-13-2014, 03:26 AM
For me, it's the sound of it. And I think that's because where I live it's usually said with venom.

Katana
01-13-2014, 09:09 AM
Oooo, lots of interesting info here! :D

I'm waffling between bitch and cow. Both are used here in North America, so either would be widely understood in many countries. Bint might be too regional, and wouldn't have the same impact because of that. I'm disappointed that twat won't work. I'm rather fond of that word. I'll probably end up going with something like 'nasty bitch', as I guess that will have the most dramatic impact.

Thank you to everyone for the suggestions. I'm very grateful, and it's been an entertaining read! :Hug2:

GailD
01-13-2014, 01:55 PM
'Tosser' is not uncommon, but my personal favourite is 'git'.

Definition here (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=git)


'Bloody stupid git!', would have me laughing. :D

shaldna
01-13-2014, 03:40 PM
'Tosser' is not uncommon, but my personal favourite is 'git'.

Definition here (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=git)


'Bloody stupid git!', would have me laughing. :D

A git is a pregnant camel. Just sayin'

mirandashell
01-13-2014, 03:50 PM
Is that what git means? I didn't know that.

Torgo
01-13-2014, 04:34 PM
Is that what git means? I didn't know that.

It's a corruption of 'get' (meaning a bastard), which was standard English for a long time, but not any more.

mirandashell
01-13-2014, 04:36 PM
Ok, which of you two is correct? And which is winding me up?

Wilde_at_heart
01-13-2014, 05:58 PM
Besides coming up with a slur, an upper class person might very well want to put a clerk 'in her place' as it were.
If she had say, a distinctive working class or northern accent he might make some nasty remark about her needing elocution lessons, otherwise he might say something along the lines of how the economy can't be that bad if someone like her still manages to be employed.

Just a thought...


Ok, which of you two is correct? And which is winding me up?

:ROFL:

I've never known what a 'git' actually is beyond that it's an insult.

williemeikle
01-13-2014, 06:14 PM
It's a corruption of 'get' (meaning a bastard), which was standard English for a long time, but not any more.

"Get" is still very much in use in West and Central Scotland where it is much more widespread than "Git"

Los Pollos Hermanos
01-13-2014, 10:45 PM
"Git" and "tosser" tend to be aimed towards the male of the species.

ClareGreen
01-14-2014, 06:07 AM
I'm told that 'twat' is highly offensive in parts of the USA, even more so than 'cunt'.

One thought for someone upper-class might be to have him quote rather than just swear? Shakespeare has some lovely turns of phrase for that sort of thing, for instance, and an upper-class man would be expected to know and potentially make use of them.

williemeikle
01-14-2014, 07:13 AM
Somewhat as an aside... I got a laugh in the AVENGERS movie when Loki called Black Widow a 'mewling quim'

I wonder if anyone in Hollywood knew what that meant, and whether they'd have let it pass if they did?

LA*78
01-14-2014, 07:42 AM
Is moll used in the UK? It's a common one here in Aus.

Snitchcat
01-14-2014, 12:42 PM
An upper class gentleman may quote Shakespeare:


Dissembling harlot, thou art false in all!
They lie deadly that tell you you have good faces.
More of your conversation would infect my brain.
Thou hast the most unsavoury similes
Hag of all despite!

You may also find this site useful:

http://www.pangloss.com/seidel/shake_rule.html


ETA:
Personally, I'd probably go for something like "Brainless harpy". :tongue

mirandashell
01-14-2014, 01:03 PM
Is moll used in the UK? It's a common one here in Aus.

Only when it has 'gangster's' in front of it, usually.

akiwiguy
01-14-2014, 01:38 PM
Off topic really, but...

It's fascinating the different interpretations of words according to culture, especially the c*** word.

Here in NZ, I could say to a friend, about another person, "He's a really good c***" and it would be a compliment.

But if I said, "He's nothing but a c***", I'd be expressing a real loathing for someone, basically a hatred.

Irrespective of how I was using the word, I wouldn't use that in any old company. Only around someone who I knew would not be offended by foul language.

Just a few nights back one of my friend's wife recounted what to me was a rather amusing story. My friend, who swears like crazy, had to make a speech at the wedding of a member of his bike club (social bikers rather than a gang, but nevertheless somewhat rough guys). So the setting was a mixture of the grooms mates, along with the somewhat "straighter" family of the bride.

So my friend, I suspect after quite a few drinks, stood up and said something like, "Now, some of you probably think members of bike clubs are a pack of c***s. But most of us, like the groom here, are actually really good c***s!"

His wife was shrinking, thinking to herself, "Oh my God, don't say anymore...PLEEEAAASE!"

Even when not used in an aggressive way, it's simply not appropriate here amongst certain company.

Mr Flibble
01-14-2014, 04:40 PM
Off topic really, but...

It's fascinating the different interpretations of words according to culture, especially the c*** word.

Here in NZ, I could say to a friend, about another person, "He's a really good c***" and it would be a compliment.

But if I said, "He's nothing but a c***", I'd be expressing a real loathing for someone, basically a hatred.

Reminds me of the scene in 51st State (or Formula 51) where Robert Carlyle gives Samule L Jackson a short lesson in British slang

Felix: Oh, bollocks!
Elmo: Dog's bollocks?
Felix: No, just plain fucking bollocks!
Elmo: No dog involved? So, let me get this straight. "Bollocks" is bad, whereas "the dogs bollocks" is good, huh?

mirandashell
01-14-2014, 04:43 PM
I once had to drag an Irish friend of mine away from a bloke she was about to smack cos he called her the 'dog's bollocks'. Took a while before she calmed down enough to hear me say it was a compliment! LOL!

waylander
01-14-2014, 04:50 PM
Because the dog is inordinately proud of them

shaldna
01-14-2014, 04:57 PM
Most offensive thing you can call someone in Ireland? 'English'

ClareGreen
01-14-2014, 06:55 PM
Most offensive thing you can call someone in Ireland? 'English'

Same in Wales, and parts of Scotland...

ClaraBrooks
01-15-2014, 03:09 PM
My two cents on this issue.

I think that ‘twat’ is a great word and it’s something I tend to use a lot in my circles. There’s no distinction between calling a man or woman a twat anymore than there’s a distinction between calling a man or a woman a cunt. You’d call a man or woman a dickhead, too, to be honest. (You can probably tell I have a bit of cockney blood in me…) Generally you’d say “fucking twat”or “stupid twat” rather than “you twat” though. Not sure why, I guess it’s just a more colourful insult.

As for cunt and it’s varying uses – Any swearword can be used affectionately “you dick, you twat, you knob” etc are all terms of endearment if you say them with the right face in the right situation. Language is about how we use it, afterall. Cunt, however, remains the single most insulting word in the English language, for reasons I can’t really fathom – the vagina must be a terrible, terrible thing – it’s the one word that a large percentage of the population won’t stand to hear… generally citing reasons of “offences to women”. Personally I find that ridiculous and I use the word like there’s no tomorrow, but it’s worth noting if you want a sense of British culture, that, yes, many people will curl up and die if they hear the sounds of a particular combination of four letters.

mirandashell
01-15-2014, 03:16 PM
Yeah..... and let's not worry how much you've just offended other people on this thread, shall we?

Cath
01-15-2014, 04:03 PM
Deep breath all. Language of this nature can be evocative and sensitive. Is you have anything further to contribute to the OP please do, but proceed with caution.

Once!
01-15-2014, 04:20 PM
I don't know if it has changed recently, but for a long time the BBC had only two words which it considered to be unsayable under any circumstances - the c word and the oedipal swear word ("mofo").

Call me old fashioned, but that still seems to be a good rule to me. I'll make an honourable exception for Pulp Fiction.

As to the dog's ... ahem. How can I put this politely? I had always assumed that this was due to the way that that particular part of the canine anatomy was on prominent show in short-haired breeds. The logic seemed to be that he must be proud of them if he is displaying them to the world. If baboons were more common, I suspect we would talk about the "baboons b....." Which would also have the benefit of alliteration.

But (1) if you say that someone is "talking b...", that means that he is talking rubbish.

But (2) if someone has balls or cojones of steel, he is brave.

Doncha just love how contrary the English language can be? I remember that when Michael Jackson's album "Bad" came out someone had to explain to me that it meant "good". Not to mention all the blue collar folks on the discovery channel who keep saying that something is badass, which apparently doesn't mean that is bad or related in any way to their bottoms. Or anyone else's bottoms for that matter.

Sandbar
01-15-2014, 05:03 PM
Offering another vote for "cow". In our house it's usually preceded by "stupid fucking--", but we're mostly expatriate Scots and nowhere near posh.

ClaraBrooks
01-15-2014, 06:50 PM
Yeah..... and let's not worry how much you've just offended other people on this thread, shall we?

Honestly, I think that if you're a writer you have to be prepared to examine language like a doctor has to be prepared to examine bodies. I don't think you'd be a great doctor if you were squeamish about private parts or, blood, or people's innards.

I didn't actually call anyone here a cunt, so I don't think that I was being insulting?

onesecondglance
01-15-2014, 07:51 PM
Yes, but you could be a great ENT specialist and still be a bit squeamish about liquid diarrhoea. :D

There's nothing wrong with refraining from writing the word in full in politeness to those people who have already said that use of said word is bound to get you thumped. I also note that the thread is regarding an insult, not necessarily swearing.

It's about recognising who your audience is and using appropriate language for that audience - core skills for a writer. :)

Buffysquirrel
01-15-2014, 08:16 PM
There was an insult used on Heartbeat today that might be appropriate--'silly mare'.

mirandashell
01-15-2014, 09:11 PM
Yes, but you could be a great ENT specialist and still be a bit squeamish about liquid diarrhoea. :D

There's nothing wrong with refraining from writing the word in full in politeness to those people who have already said that use of said word is bound to get you thumped. I also note that the thread is regarding an insult, not necessarily swearing.

It's about recognising who your audience is and using appropriate language for that audience - core skills for a writer. :)

Thank you. That was much more reasoned than I would have been.

Sketti
01-15-2014, 09:22 PM
I'm loving this thread. See, I am familiar enough with North American culture from having lived years over there and now I'm in England.

I find "twat" too tricky to use in writing because in my part of England, calling someone a "twat" is not calling them a "cunt". "Twat" is only now becoming associated with that part of the female anatomy because of AMERICAN stuff. Basically here twat and twit are interchangeable, that's how innoffensive and insult that it. So if I were reading a Brit char calling an American a twat, I'd be like, well, the American is not gonna take that well even though the poor Brit didn't mean much about it.

Kinda like how a "fag" here is not the same as "gay", it's just a cigarette...

I'd say you could use the words but you need to be aware of who'll be reading it and how the other characters will interpret it. I expect that if he called her a twat in an American setting, he would get into a lot more trouble than he would expect because that is just NOT acceptable in a professional setting. I'd expect that character to get a serious talking to from HR by which I mean a serious review ;)

jaksen
01-15-2014, 09:29 PM
I used to talk to a lot of young men online. (I am late middle-aged and female but I liked the same kind of music they did.) Many of these fellows were from England and if they got upset or angry at a fellow, female chatter, they'd call her a 'twat.' I saw it written a lot. Sometimes in capitals. Sometimes written T. W. A. T.

They never said that about me, though. They treated me like I was their little old granny. :D

ClaraBrooks
01-15-2014, 10:16 PM
It's about recognising who your audience is and using appropriate language for that audience - core skills for a writer. :)

For me, I'd say that writing is about understanding the society and culture that you live in and finding intriguing ways to express your thoughts and observations. I certainly don't write with the expectation that no-one is ever going to disagree or be offended, I don't think I'd be being honest with myself or my potential audience.

Sorry for offending. Don't read my work, I use the word c*** a lot!

mirandashell
01-15-2014, 10:19 PM
Thank you for the apology. And the choice to not read your work.


Which I didn't get here......


:tongue.

Buffysquirrel
01-15-2014, 11:37 PM
I find "twat" too tricky to use in writing because in my part of England, calling someone a "twat" is not calling them a "cunt". "Twat" is only now becoming associated with that part of the female anatomy because of AMERICAN stuff.

I'm not sure that's true. It carried that meaning way back in the 1980s when I warned my husband not to use it oop North.

williemeikle
01-16-2014, 12:34 AM
I'm not sure that's true. It carried that meaning way back in the 1980s when I warned my husband not to use it oop North.

And to add to the female genitalia insults, in Scotland, and Glasgow in particular, 'fanny' is often used instead of twat. Another one that means something different in the US.

ClareGreen
01-16-2014, 02:14 AM
And to add to the female genitalia insults, in Scotland, and Glasgow in particular, 'fanny' is often used instead of twat. Another one that means something different in the US.

Oh yes, that one. An American friend said in casual conversation that he'd patted his young daughter on the fanny and sent her out to play, and my brain crunched its gearbox and refused to restart for a while.

eyeblink
01-16-2014, 03:39 AM
The C-word isn't one I would use in real life, other than quoting someone. But if it's something people would say I have no qualms about using it or any other swear word in a work of fiction. There are two uses of it in Partings and Greetings as it currently stands, and yes I know it's a YA novel.

In a recent short story, it turned up as part of the name of a genuine late-70s/80s Australian punk band. Youtube link which may be NSFW for the band name, though not the song, here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFnj8OvTUmw).

maryland
01-18-2014, 02:32 PM
A middle-of-the road remark would be 'stupid bat' and even better would be 'stupid old bat.' It's polite enough to get away with, but still has a sting to it and is only applied to females.

Buffysquirrel
01-18-2014, 09:28 PM
Oh yes, that one. An American friend said in casual conversation that he'd patted his young daughter on the fanny and sent her out to play, and my brain crunched its gearbox and refused to restart for a while.

Lol! I remember when fanny packs started appearing over here and I'm going...fanny packs? For REALS? Eh.

Los Pollos Hermanos
01-19-2014, 06:57 PM
We used "twot" at school (early 90s, Kent) - not sure what led to that variation, but it was used in the same way as you'd use "twat". Never heard "twot" up north, btw.

However, to give someone a good twatting means they've had a slapping/beating, rather than they've had an enjoyable experience with a... ;)

mirandashell
01-19-2014, 07:19 PM
'Twonk' is another variation but it may be specific to the Midlands. I don't know.

Los Pollos Hermanos
01-19-2014, 08:10 PM
I'm wary of using twonk - I know it means idiot, but people sometimes think you mean twat. Although I'll quite happily say "you berk", and that derives from the ladygarden school of insults!

mirandashell
01-19-2014, 08:12 PM
True! LOL!