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inspiredbymusic
01-06-2014, 10:18 PM
Alright, since my earlier thread went off on a few tangents and seemed to end with the conclusion that the situation I wanted to write wasn’t plausible, I’m trying a new thread looking for input on a slightly different scenario:

. After leaving prom, a teen couple are in a car accident.

. They are rushed to the ER and are being worked on simultaneously in close proximity (as described in this response by iLion in my previous thread):
On the other hand...
you could reasonably have an ER situation where both teens were in the same room being worked on at the same time. I work at a hospital where the ER beds are side-by-side, and separated by only a sliding curtain and just enough space for the many caregivers to manuever.

I can envision a scene where the two are side-by-side in separate beds (of course) and the boy can get glimpses of the girl as the curtain gets bumped and brushed by her ED crew. Of course, he would also hear pieces of the ER conversations and orders from MD etc, and finally maybe even pronouncement of death. It's chaotic to the outsider though, so you might not get a lot of detail that way.

When the two initially are brought into ER, the extent of injury is unknown, so they could easily be worked on side-by-side simultaneously - and with all the profuse blood from the boy's concussion that involved scalp lacerations (they often beed tons), it can look much worse than it really is - therefore being wheeled directly into ER with the girl.

. The boy’s injuries are not serious but ER personnel don’t know that initially since there is a great deal of blood everywhere, both from his head lacerations and from the girl.

. The girl has a severe laceration and dies of blood loss before the injury can be repaired.

Question 1: What type of laceration (preferably in the neck area) could plausibly result in this type of death AND could conceivably be repaired after her death, without too much difficulty by a teen science genius, i.e., something that he could plausibly stitch up with some knowledge and skills, but without (obviously) being a surgeon himself?

. I need to have the girl die quickly in the ER while the boy is still present so that he knows she died and has overheard information about her injury and condition.

. This is a Frankenstein-type story. The boy is going to bring her back to life so obviously this is not reality, but I would like this situation to at least be somewhat plausible.

Question 2: What happens to a body when someone dies in ER, both short-term (immediately) and longer-term? If you can give me an approximate time frame I would greatly appreciate it! When and where is the body moved to? Does it go directly to the morgue? And when and where does the family identify the body?

Question 3: Lastly, when and where are family members informed of a death, assuming that they are at the hospital when the death occurs? Actually if there’s a car accident and the accident victims are rushed to the ER, how quickly would family be contacted normally if the victim is a minor?

Any and all feedback and suggestions appreciated! Thank you.

kaitie
01-06-2014, 11:51 PM
Just for curiosity sake, how are you planning to deal wit the embalming situation? If he's needing to keep her body actually functioning with blood and what not (which you seem to want because of the need to have a functioning body), how does the embalming situation factor into things?

WeaselFire
01-07-2014, 01:00 AM
1) Jugular, Carotid. Bleeds out, any fool can stitch, glue, staple or duct tape it.

2) It sits until an orderly can move it. It will need a time of death and tag before it gets sent, could just be chart notations. 5-10 minutes to 1/2 hour.

3) Officers from the scene will make contact as quickly as possible. Could be a phone call since there are no deaths (yet). Family arrives as fast as family arrives.

4) You didn't ask it: This is a fantasy, write what you need. It doens't need to be spot on, just plausible given your story line.

Jeff

NeuroGlide
01-07-2014, 01:03 AM
Question 1: What type of laceration (preferably in the neck area) could plausibly result in this type of death AND could conceivably be repaired after her death, without too much difficulty by a teen science genius, i.e., something that he could plausibly stitch up with some knowledge and skills, but without (obviously) being a surgeon himself?

. I need to have the girl die quickly in the ER while the boy is still present so that he knows she died and has overheard information about her injury and condition.

. This is a Frankenstein-type story. The boy is going to bring her back to life so obviously this is not reality, but I would like this situation to at least be somewhat plausible.

Severing the carotid (neck) artery is enough to get her to bleed out. Have her arrive with no detectable pulse or blood pressure and her heart in atrial fibrillation (afib). He'll hear several medical instructions he won't (yet) understand, then the solid tone of a flatline, followed by the muted voices of a failed resuscitation. Then he'll hear it turned off.

inspiredbymusic
01-07-2014, 04:22 AM
Perfect!
Thank you all for sharing your knowledge!

Dandroid
01-10-2014, 05:06 AM
Vfib rather than afib...

nikkidj
01-10-2014, 06:49 PM
If the family comes to the hospital and the patient died in the ER trauma room, the ER doctor will most likely notify the family of the patient's death. Every ER I've ever worked in has a special room for this, called a Quiet Room. The room usually has some comfortable chairs and several phones so the family can make phone calls as needed. They usher the family in there, assemble the necessary personnel (doctor, nurse, and often a chaplain or social worker), and then tell the family. Some smaller community hospitals will bring a trolley of coffee, soft drinks, and snacks for the family to eat while they notify family and choose a funeral home (we'd order a "grieving tray" for the family from nutrition services). After death notification, and once the staff have cleared up the trauma room a bit (no bloody towels, etc on the floor), the family will likely be taken into the trauma room to see the patient. If this was a traumatic arrest, the patient will likely be a coroner's case, so endotracheal tube, IVs, and monitor leads will still be in place. Then the family is usually allowed to spend time with the deceased prior to moving the body to the morgue (if a coroner's case) or removal by the funeral home (if not). We try to let the family spend as much time as they need with the body.

HTH.