PDA

View Full Version : Full Scholarship in Senior year of HS, followed by Full Scholarship to College



Putputt
12-27-2013, 11:54 PM
My MC needs to have a full scholarship to a private boarding school in the US, followed by an offer for a full ride to college contingent on her grades. Thing is, I'm not sure what she needs to excel at in order for this to be believable? I'm open to anything (academic/athletic/artistic/whatever else that might get you full rides) as long as it is contingent on her maintaining good grades through HS.

I guess my other question is: Is it realistic for a private HS to offer a scholarship to a student in sophomore/junior year, or are they more likely to offer it at the beginning of HS? Ideally I'd like her to start at the school either as a junior or a senior, but if that's going to trigger the BS button, I'll have to come up with something else...

Thank you!!

ap123
12-28-2013, 12:22 AM
It is extremely competitive to be offered admission and a full ride to the private boarding schools. Each year they have x amount of spots, and then y amount of scholarship funds available. (There are a couple that are needs blind, but most are not)

Every year further along (soph, junior, senior), there are fewer spots for admission, and less funds available for new scholarships, but they do exist, and it wouldn't be unheard of at all. You can definitely make this work.

FYI, there're also a good number of kids who go in as "repeats," sometimes to increase their odds of admission, sometimes to bring them up to speed academically, bc the better private schools tend to be more rigorous than their public counterparts. This is not to say these kids are any less academically inclined, just didn't have as much info available in earlier schools. It does also happen sometimes for athletic purposes, I think the term in college sports "redshirting."

My oldest went to boarding on full scholarship, now on scholarship in college. Middle guy is also on full scholarship in a different boarding school.

I can probably help with any questions you might have, details to make it realistic within the framework of your story.

The competition for these slots is unbelievably fierce, mandatory visits, interviews of both kids and parents, and about 8 gazillion essays. Financials for scholarships is on par with figuring out a &$*@ mortgage. As in, by the time the oldest was applying for college, the process felt like a breeze.

Putputt
12-28-2013, 12:40 AM
It is extremely competitive to be offered admission and a full ride to the private boarding schools. Each year they have x amount of spots, and then y amount of scholarship funds available. (There are a couple that are needs blind, but most are not)

Every year further along (soph, junior, senior), there are fewer spots for admission, and less funds available for new scholarships, but they do exist, and it wouldn't be unheard of at all. You can definitely make this work.

FYI, there're also a good number of kids who go in as "repeats," sometimes to increase their odds of admission, sometimes to bring them up to speed academically, bc the better private schools tend to be more rigorous than their public counterparts. This is not to say these kids are any less academically inclined, just didn't have as much info available in earlier schools. It does also happen sometimes for athletic purposes, I think the term in college sports "redshirting."

My oldest went to boarding on full scholarship, now on scholarship in college. Middle guy is also on full scholarship in a different boarding school.

I can probably help with any questions you might have, details to make it realistic within the framework of your story.

The competition for these slots is unbelievably fierce, mandatory visits, interviews of both kids and parents, and about 8 gazillion essays. Financials for scholarships is on par with figuring out a &$*@ mortgage. As in, by the time the oldest was applying for college, the process felt like a breeze.

Umgz, you are like a walking goldmine. Watch out for incoming PMs with 237846189235821 queshuns... :D

ap123
12-28-2013, 12:44 AM
:thankyou:

I love feeling useful, it's so rare. ;)

quickWit
12-28-2013, 12:46 AM
Conversely Pp, if you ever want to learn all there is to know about the dreadful shortcomings of a limited public school education, look no further.

*smoothes unibrow
*flexes glutes

boom. :)

Putputt
12-28-2013, 12:55 AM
:thankyou:

I love feeling useful, it's so rare. ;)

LIES! It is so far from rare, you crazy thing!


Conversely Pp, if you ever want to learn all there is to know about the dreadful shortcomings of a limited public school education, look no further.

*smoothes unibrow
*flexes glutes

boom. :)

They don't look like shortcomings to me... :e2brows:

quickWit
12-28-2013, 01:02 AM
thanks, I've been working out

ap123
12-28-2013, 01:38 AM
Oh Quick….

:swoons:


I'm a product of limited and overcrowded public school myself. If I'm not mistaken, my hs had the distinction of being the first in the city to get a metal detector. One little explosion, everyone gets all paranoid.

Pushingfordream
12-28-2013, 03:58 AM
I have attended boarding school and I know a good amount of kids who get full ride to both. (Depending on if there good at sports or a genius in there country who is poor)

ULTRAGOTHA
12-28-2013, 04:45 AM
This essay by John Scalzi (http://whatever.scalzi.com/2012/07/23/a-self-made-man-looks-at-how-he-made-it/), describing how he got a scholarship to Webb school and to U of Chicago might be of interest to you.

ElaineA
12-28-2013, 09:29 PM
IF you want to include the sports route, Put, there are good opportunities for college scholarships for women playing soccer, softball and volleyball (although I think the full-ride opportunities there are limited to certain schools, depending on the sport. At many schools they would be partials.) Basketball and, believe it or not, rowing are the best bets. An astonishingly high number of varsity women rowers are on full rides. Two sisters from my kids' HS are on full rides and neither rowed a day in her life before heading to uni. They were recruited for body size once they stepped on campus. But most of the team came from a rowing background and got their offers during senior year.

If it's something you want to explore for your story, you could have a combo of academic/sport/need-based scholarships, as well.

wendymarlowe
12-29-2013, 10:26 PM
Being a National Merit Scholar is good for free rides to college - I got offers from (IIRC) Nebraska A&M, Oklahoma A&M, somewhere in South Carolina, and something with "Texas" in the name, and I think a few more. All of them were for at least free tuition, and at least one or two of them offered to pay for books and living expenses as well. National Merit status is based on the PSAT, which you take your junior year - it's intended as a pre-SAT (college entrance) test, but when you take it you indicate which colleges you're particularly interested in and whether you want to receive brochures from other schools. Colleges then send brochures to everyone who gets at least a certain score on the test - different schools have different thresholds.

(I turned those offers down and ended up going to a school which didn't offer any specific scholarships, but I still got $4000 from the National Merit foundation, which was very nice!)

Beyond that, most schools have at least a few merit-based scholarships out there, plus there are lot of private ones. You have to do a lot of looking, though, and many of them are pretty specific - "women going into engineering at this school" or "Hispanic music majors" or "transgender people of color looking for careers in architecture" or even one for "people named John Finkelstein." (I don't remember the exact name, but as of fifteen years ago, there was indeed a scholarship for students with a particular first + last name combination!)

Putputt
12-30-2013, 01:38 AM
Thank you everyone for the info! Y'all are the helpfulestest!!

*hippohug for everywun!*

nikkidj
12-30-2013, 04:48 AM
Make sure you research your school carefully, if it's a real school. My university didn't offer any merit-based scholarships. Not for grades, not for test scores, not for athletics. Admission was need-blind, and then scholarships were available for those with financial need.