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maggi90w1
12-19-2013, 03:06 PM
My main character was thrown thrown through a window and now he has severe injuries. I was thinking a concussion, deep cuts and a couple of shards still in his body, head and neck area, including one in the eye (he need to loose the eye).
His companions can't get him to a hospital, but one of them is a paramedic.
What would they do?

TIA!

(Genre is science fiction)

WeaselFire
12-19-2013, 05:30 PM
You're describing injuries that need hospital or advanced medical treatment.

Jeff

maggi90w1
12-19-2013, 08:40 PM
You're describing injuries that need hospital or advanced medical treatment
That's not a very helpful comment. How about some details, so I can adjust my scenario accordingly? Hospital is out of the question. Advanced medical treatment is not (It's scifi after all).

jimmymc
12-19-2013, 09:35 PM
Assuming this is a Dystopian scenario. The pieces of glass need to come out... else, damage will continue. Clean wounds with alcohol(should be available. If not, make it so). Bandage with clean cloth and a patch for the eye.

Sulfur powder is a mild antiseptic, applied to wounds. Maggots can clean wounds of dead tissue.

Nivarion
12-19-2013, 10:56 PM
He would eventually need to get to a hospital. I've done a lot of first aid, and I would remove the large visible pieces of glass, pack and bandage the cuts. If any pieces are very deep, or where I know/suspect an artery to be I would leave them in and try to keep him from moving there with a splint of some kind.

The eye you would want to place a cup (foam, preferably but you can use a camp cup) over the eye and bandage it to his head. From there I would try and get him to the hospital ASAHP.

asroc
12-20-2013, 12:04 AM
I can't really help you with scifi medical treatment, but I can tell you what a modern paramedic (US) could do (with standard equipment minus transport to a hospital):

For the concussion, nothing. The best treatment is rest. Give some over-the-counter painkillers for the headaches, if necessary. However, the medic has to make sure it actually is a concussion. So he should do a neurological exam and keep a close eye on the patient.

Cuts: Clean them, control bleeding, apply pressure bandage and dress wound.

Embedded glass: Usually, penetrating objects should be secured in place to be removed by a doctor, but if that's not an option, the medic can carefully remove them himself with tweezers and/or a sterilized needle for anything deep under the skin. Keep it clean, irrigate with saline, disinfect, be ready to control bleeding. It's quite possible that removing the embedded object will cause severe hemorrhage, so the medic should be very reluctant to do this.

The eye is difficult, because if the glass is still in the eye, it really should only be removed at the hospital (see above). But if the medic has to do it, do it under conditions as sterile as possible. There'll be vitreous fluid so once done, cover the eye with a damp sterile dressing so it won't dehydrate. Cover the other one, too, so that the injured one won't move when the other one does. Some ambulance services carry a special ophthalmic anesthetic called tetracaine. The medic can give that for pain control. The patient will most likely lose vision in that eye, but since that's what you need...

General: Start an IV, give oxygen, monitor the patient.

This is, obviously, less than ideal, but under those circumstances that's about it.

CoolBlue
12-20-2013, 06:54 AM
My main character was thrown thrown through a window and now he has severe injuries. I was thinking a concussion, deep cuts and a couple of shards still in his body, head and neck area, including one in the eye (he need to loose the eye).
His companions can't get him to a hospital, but one of them is a paramedic.


Unless the paramedic has other skills, s/he would be significantly out of their depth. Paramedics are trained to diagnose and provide the critical support needed to get to specific, specialized care.

That said, the principles would be:

1. The concussion would not need any specific treatment, just support - brain rest and analgesia.
2. Glass shards in the neck will give trouble, and need to come out. It is very difficult to see glass, even fairly large pieces, in a wound. If there is no imaging available, best is to carefully probe the wound. (The glass clicks when contacted by metal). If there is significant vascular damage, it is unlikely the paramedic will be able to deal with it, even with instruments.
3. This is the biggie. If there is a significant injury that causes ultimate blindness, the eye will have to be removed. The risk is an inflammatory process ETA: in the good eye, that follows a similar process in the injured eye, resulting in complete blindness.

HTH
CB

blacbird
12-20-2013, 09:37 AM
A few years ago we had an incident in my town where some people got into an altercation outside a bar, and one person threw a beer bottle at another. The bottle struck a car next to the guy, shattered, and one piece of glass hit him in the neck and severed his carotid artery. He collapsed immediately and was dead within a couple of minutes, long before any medical help could arrive.

For your story, you need to be both specific and careful about the injuries involved. But it's a story, so you're in control of it. To quote Jean-Luc Picard:

"Make it so."

caw

maggi90w1
12-20-2013, 02:44 PM
Thank you guys, that was super helpful. You're the best.

WeaselFire
12-20-2013, 07:23 PM
Your real problem is the shard in the eye. But it's sci-fi so maybe they have medical robots that can do the surgery. If you just need vision loss or damage, you could work an injury that has no shards impaled in the eye but a slice to the cornea or even nerve damage. Lots easier for a medic to deal with in the field.

Jeff