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mccardey
12-19-2013, 05:04 AM
For current WiP, I'd like to understand about hunting and trapping, especially birds and small animals in a jungle context.

If anyone has any first-hand knowledge of this, or knows any really good resources, do please let me know. (Note: there may be some stupid questions involved. Prolly will be.)

Thank you :)

Wicked
12-19-2013, 06:25 AM
I don't know how relevant they would be to your story, due to them being written around the turn of the twentieth century, but any of the Jim Corbett books would be good. (depending on what exactly you are looking for)

Jungle Lore
The Temple Tiger
Man-Eaters of Kumaon

He spent most of his life in India, and talks a lot about jungle life. Though he was a hunter of man-eaters, he had a great love for the natural world around him, the country, and its people. Went on to be a conservationist, and one of the national parks was named after him.

Helix
12-19-2013, 06:51 AM
What sort of trapping? Would it help to talk to zoologists who use live traps and camera traps in rainforest in Qld and SE Asia? I've got binders full of those.

mccardey
12-19-2013, 07:05 AM
What sort of trapping? Would it help to talk to zoologists who use live traps and camera traps in rainforest in Qld and SE Asia? I've got binders full of those.

Oh, yes! :) SEA is where Book is set - I have a young Euro child who often sees a young orang asli man trapping birds. I went up to Indonesia and talked to a few, and saw how it was done (the gum-on-branch method and some netting - also decoy birds - ugh :( ) - but I'm really lacking the feel of it, and the words for the practices. (I speak some bahasa, but not that fluently, so I couldn't translate the rhythm and nuance of trapping. If you know what I mean. The poetry of it.)

I'm really looking to get inside the feel of it, which was impossible to do in just a few days as an outsider.

Anything that might help? Just titles or researchers names would be a good start - I can go up to the archives and look stuff up and immerse.

PS: Some of the book is set in 1941 which is when my MC's memories are formed. But I'd like her to have retained an interest in trapping and reading about it, so modern methods would also be something useful to know about.

mccardey
12-19-2013, 07:12 AM
I don't know how relevant they would be to your story, due to them being written around the turn of the twentieth century, but any of the Jim Corbett books would be good. (depending on what exactly you are looking for)

Wicked - thank you. This is a great start. Just looked him up, and I'm sure I'll be able to get a sense of things. That's my Christmas reading sorted :)

Helix
12-19-2013, 07:18 AM
Imma send you a couple of names via PM.

I'll have a think about works relevant to your time and list them as (if) they come to me. It might be worth having a peek at Alfred Russel Wallace's The Malay Archipelago, which was written in 1869. Completely out of your time period, of course, but might have some interesting insights. Should be available free online.

mccardey
12-19-2013, 07:30 AM
Imma send you a couple of names via PM.

I'll have a think about works relevant to your time and list them as (if) they come to me. It might be worth having a peek at Alfred Russel Wallace's The Malay Archipelago, which was written in 1869. Completely out of your time period, of course, but might have some interesting insights. Should be available free online.

Oh, that keeps coming up on my watch list on ebay. And yes, I just checked it's available via Gutenberg. Downloading now - you are clever!

This is a problem with me - I love the research and immersion almost more than the writing. But hey - it's Christmas :)

Helix
12-19-2013, 07:40 AM
Might be worth having a look at some ethnographic texts on the area, because they would examine that sort of hunting from a different perspective.

Helix
12-19-2013, 08:05 AM
I've been looking at the web site of my favourite SE Asian publisher and have found another possibility, but am not sure whether it'll be useful. The focus is on Borneo.

Forest Life and Adventures in the Malay Archipelago (http://www.nhpborneo.com/book/f039) by Eric Mjoberg. Mjoberg was a Swedish biologist and anthropologist who travelled extensively in Asia and northern Australia in the early 1900s.

Warning: You might find yourself a) lost and/or b) wanting to spend up big on that site.

mccardey
12-19-2013, 08:21 AM
I've been looking at the web site of my favourite SE Asian publisher and have found another possibility, but am not sure whether it'll be useful. The focus is on Borneo.

Forest Life and Adventures in the Malay Archipelago (http://www.nhpborneo.com/book/f039) by Eric Mjoberg. Mjoberg was a Swedish biologist and anthropologist who travelled extensively in Asia and northern Australia in the early 1900s.

Warning: You might find yourself a) lost and/or b) wanting to spend up big on that site.

Oh that's amazing. I could do damage there. There's a book I want that's a steal at 115 malaysia ringgit...

Helix
12-19-2013, 08:29 AM
I know! And I've just remembered the Indonesian publishing house Periplus, which has an online book store. Here's their catalogue of books about Indonesia (http://www.periplus.com/c/1/books?anl=801).

WeaselFire
12-19-2013, 05:29 PM
There are only a billion sources for this, try Fur Fish and Game magazine or your local library.

Jeff

mccardey
12-20-2013, 12:15 AM
There are only a billion sources for this, try Fur Fish and Game magazine or your local library.

Jeff

Thanks, but I'm looking for something a little more expansive than magazines, and hoping for recommendations from people to save me from disappearing under the weight of the billion offerings available. I want immersive-type reading. What's your best suggestion for that?

ETA: Just if you don't mind ;)

WeaselFire
12-20-2013, 07:02 PM
Try "Catching Wild Beasts Alive" for a good turn of the century perspective:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1930585470/strangeark-20

Jeff

espresso5
12-21-2013, 03:24 AM
If you just want a feel for how it's done and technique, YouTube has tons of videos.

Maryn
12-21-2013, 05:03 AM
The box propped up with a stick on a string, with bait under the box, works surprisingly well. In my childhood, my friends and I caught small mammals and birds with it numerous times, then didn't know what to do with them and always freed them.

Maryn, short of a great hunter, but with practical knowledge

shaldna
12-21-2013, 03:40 PM
For current WiP, I'd like to understand about hunting and trapping, especially birds and small animals in a jungle context.

If anyone has any first-hand knowledge of this, or knows any really good resources, do please let me know. (Note: there may be some stupid questions involved. Prolly will be.)

Thank you :)

A lot of how you hunt depends on whether you want the animal alive at the end or not - trapping / hunting for pets/exhibition is very different to trapping for food/necessity.

With birds and some small animals you are likely to use a wire/string loop system - they are loosely tied loops of wire around/over a food source. the animals puts their head in and when they pull away the loop tightens and if the animal continues to struggle they will suffocate.

Another option is a spring trap - think bear trap but on a tiny scale. Pressure/weight triggered, with birds it's not as successful as a look or cage, and with animals like rabbits it's likely to still result in death through shock.

There are also small entry traps - cages that have a small entrance leading to a large enclosure. Think lobster pot and you have the right idea. Sometimes these traps are self closing when triggered - you'll hear them called humane traps. The idea is that the entrance is so small that when the animal enters it's too difficult to find it's way out again.

When hunting small animals like rabbits etc it's common to use terriers.